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I built a boombox to take to college and other adventures. I read as many instructables and /r/diy posts as possible and used SketchUp to create a design I liked.

Basic power tool and electrical wiring knowledge necessary. Not necessarily before, but definitely after :^)

Full parts list:

  1. Lepai 2020A+ Amplifier
  2. 2x Rockford Fosgate 6.5" 3-way speakers
  3. 2x 2.5" recycled Bose sounddock speakers
  4. UPG 8Ah SLA battery
  5. Battery Tender Junior 12V charger
  6. LCD Voltmeter
  7. Dual row terminal block
  8. 4x Rubber feet
  9. Port tube
  10. LED rocker switch
  11. 3.5mm aux cord
  12. 7" handle
  13. MDF (Medium-density fiberboard)
  14. Jigsaw
  15. Solder or quick connectors with wires
    (I used the wires from an old power supply)

*Link to my website *Link to /r/diy thread

Step 1: Design and Construct

I provided the sketchup file for my design.

A friend and I used a table saw (though could be done with just a jigsaw) to cut up the main panels of MDF. I then used a jigsaw to cut out holes for the speakers, amp, and voltmeter. Add some stain+polyurethane and you're on your way.

Glue the panels together and install the speakers and feet.

Step 2: Wiring

Both sets of speakers were 4ohms so I wired them in series to the Lepai amp since it can handle 2-8ohms.

Cut the power cord from the amp to the adapter and split the inner wires to yellow and black. Black being ground. The paint diagram shows cleanly how the terminal block works. I cut off the yellow and black wires from an old computer psu and crimped quick connectors to the wires for connection.

Test it out!

The battery charges while playing and will float charge once it reaches maximum capacity. The voltmeter can be read to determine the battery's charge. 12.00v ~ 25% This setup easily lasted me 3 days camping with friends. It surprised me how long it lasted, ranging from low to maximum volume. Also it charges quite quickly.

Step 3: Sealing the Box

Add a handle before you seal it if it is a handle that screws from the inside.

Seal up any areas which sound may escape with caulk and add some insulation for a cleaner bass. Glue on the final panel. Add a few screws on top and the sides for additional strength.

Add a grill to protect those speakers and tada you can hear this thing from anywhere in the house, across the lake, across the baseball field.... and anywhere else it will be taken next.

Step 4: Admire your work.

Feel free to ask me any questions!

<p>I like the design, it looks really nice. The only thing I might recommend is integrating some crossover circuits. They're designed to separate the low and high frequencies and send them to the correct speaker. This has the benefit of sounding a lot better and it will greatly increase the life of your speaker. Currently you risk overdriving them which can cause them to burn out prematurely. looks good though! That's a great little amp.</p>
<p>Hi! How would a crossover circuit be implemented here? Is it something simple that can be incorporated? Thanks in advance!</p>
<p>A crossover circuit takes a full-range input and through the use of filters, splits that input into low and high (or even low-mid-high) frequency outputs. Those outputs are then directed to the appropriate drivers. This could be incorporated here by using a simple crossover circuit constructed on perf-board for each channel, then wire the crossover outputs to the appropriate speakers. Simple crossover schematics can be found all over the web.</p>
<p>I know the boo birds are waiting in the wings, but usually when one reads &quot;wireless&quot; one is not thinking of &quot;battery powered.&quot; </p>
<p>I do.</p>
<p>&macr;\_(ツ)_/&macr;</p>
nice ...,
<p>Heey,</p><p>tell me please <a href="https://cdn.instructables.com/FBX/0QZ6/IBC2DLVM/FBX0QZ6IBC2DLVM.LARGE.jpg" rel="nofollow">https://cdn.instructables.com/FBX/0QZ6/IBC2DLVM/FBX...</a> the blue is the + and red is the -? But in the switch voltmeter which is the ground? </p><p>Thanks :)</p>
<p>nicely done, but you should've used filters between the 3-way speakers and the tweeters. Those tweeters can't handle the low frequencies, only those above 2.5Khz</p><p>giving your tweeters freq's below 2.5Khz will damage them, and rather quick.</p><p>but otherwise it's a nice system with the best brand out there! Rockford For The Win!</p>
<p>This is great! I'm totally going to build one. Thanks so much for posting this!</p>
<p>You should make a video to let us know how it sounds.</p>
<p>Very nice looking unit, nice design &amp; color used on the wood. Only one thing I would have done different, and that is not glue on the back panel, I would have gave it a rubber gasket &amp; used screws, just in case it needs service. But once again very professional looking, and I bet it sounds sweet!</p><p>Tp</p>
<p>nice clean design, what about heat dissipation from the Amp and battery? Isn't that a concern since it doesn't have sufficient airflow? And where did you find the speaker grills? </p>
<p>Neither the amp nor the battery get very hot, but it probably is a mild concern. Sorry I don't have much of an answer there. The circular grills came with the speakers, the front grill was cut and painted from the old bose sounddock grill.</p>
Great job!.,an additional Bluetooth capabilities would be nice as an upgrade later.,just my thought.,Thanks for sharing!
Hey man good work! Looks really clean, and I appreciate that in a project. Might consider using a high wattage computer power supply to allow the box to be wall powered. Just a thought - LOOKS GREAT!
<p>I bet you know more than me, but it can be wall powered with the battery tender. It can play while being float charged.</p>
<p>This is great! I've always loved homemade speakers!</p>
<p>I'm now in the same boat!</p>

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Bio: Make stuff. Do things. Make stuff do things.
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