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I made this before there were any tutorials online about wood ocarinas, now there is one by gladiator Bob, you can find it here

I have never played an ocarina before, so I had to do a lot of research to learn how they work.  I found the greenverdugo website to be very helpful in learning how clay ocarinas are made, and I transferred those techniques to woodworking .  Their website can be found here

I am thinking about selling these in the near future, after I improve my technique.  I may also make a full instructable if I choose to make more.

<p>I thought it is made from Deku tree, but it isn't. Great work tough!</p>
<p>Deku wood is getting harder to find these days... I believe Deku tree are now considered endangered in the CITES list of protected wildlife. The only legal way to obtain it now days is to find old items made from it, like shields.</p>
I am working on my second one now, It is being made of African mahogany that I got in a village in West Africa. It is bigger, better shaped, and will have more notes. I also want to inlay a triforce on it, probably with rosewood or mother of pearl. I'm sure inlaying on a curved surface will be a challenge!
How did you cut the channel that runs through the mouthpiece?
<p>If you look at the 5th picture, you can see a seam on the mouthpiece. Here are some pictures from my most recent ocarina. First, I cut down through the mouthpiece and chiseled out the waste. Then I cut off some of the wood on the back of the mouthpiece, After that, I glued a separate piece of wood over the channel to close it off. I hope that makes sense.</p><p> look at the picture with the red lines to see where I cut. Also look at the picture with the blue and green lines. The blue line shows the piece of wood I glued over the channel. The green line shows the end cap that I glued on afterward. </p><p>I simplified this a lot in my second ocarina, which is shown below. I simply glued a strip of wood into the channel. I highly recommend you use the second method.</p>
<p>Just one incredibly stupid question: in the second method, what keeps the channel open? Do you chisel a sort of shelf for the strip of wood to rest on?</p>
<p>The darker strip is glued in. Just make sure you leave a gap when you put it in. Make sure to test it without glue first. It should be tight enough to be playable before gluing it. Once you have it how you want it, remove it, apply the glue, and put it back in. Test it again before the glue dries and adjust as necessary.</p>
Excellent! Thanks for explaining - I get it now! I'm excited - I got a giant chunk of poplar for free to practice on before I start on my gorgeous walnut and cherry boards.
<p>Great! I would love to hear about your progress and see pictures.</p>
As promised, here's the update. I made my first ocarina, with mixed results. It's a 12-hole in the key of G that was supposed to range from E6 to C7, but I made the air hole too big, so the notes are very airy, and it can't play past Bb6. I didn't intend the notes to be so high, but I didn't factor the air hole into the cavity resonance equation. That said, it was my first woodworking project and I learned a lot. Most importantly, your method of making the mouthpiece worked out wonderfully for me! Thanks! Here's a couple pictures of it:<br><a href="http://s1028.photobucket.com/user/deiphobe/media/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpshktmr24t.jpeg.html" rel="nofollow"></a><br><a href="http://s1028.photobucket.com/user/deiphobe/media/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsquy5a9iu.jpeg.html" rel="nofollow"></a><br>It's made from tulip poplar. I cut the board from the log and surfaced it by hand, which was a good experience. The color difference is due to mineral staining in part of the heartwood. <br>I started an alto c ocarina in cherry over the weekend.
<p>Did you forget to add the pictures?</p>
Weird! They were initially visible, then they disappeared. Here, this time I'll just send links:<br>http://i1028.photobucket.com/albums/y342/deiphobe/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpshktmr24t.jpeg<br><br>http://i1028.photobucket.com/albums/y342/deiphobe/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsquy5a9iu.jpeg<br>
<p>That looks pretty good! Great job! Have you thought about a finish? If you want to make it look like ebony, you could ebonize it with vinegar and steel wool (there are many instructibles about that) or you could try a stain. Or you could leave it natural. Whatever you decide to do, you definitely want to finish it with some oil. I use walnut oil or sweet (not bitter) almond oil. Don't use vegetable oil because it will rot, or so I have heard. I actually soaked mine in oil for several days. It will darken the wood and protect it from moisture. </p>
I left it natural and began finishing it with mineral oil (after the pictures I sent). Following your advice, I ordered some walnut oil to use once I produce a fully functional ocarina. I have a good feeling about the cherry one I am working on now! <br>So, did you continue making ocarinas after making this guide? You mentioned wanting to experiment with inlay. If you did, how did it turn out? <br>Thanks again for all of the advice!
<p>Life happened. I started making one from ebony, but it has been a nightmare. Ebony is so hard it made big gouges in my gouges. I am in college right now so it is hard to do woodworking, but I am seriously considering starting one anyway with some of the mango wood in my car. Giving you advice has rekindled my interest.</p>
Yeah, I feel like you'd need diamond-tipped tools to carve ebony! It would be cool if you started woodwork again, but I completely understand how college takes away hobby time - I finished the major for my doctorate two years ago, and have picked up a few new hobbies since then to help me avoid writing my dissertation. :) Before that, though, I had pretty much abandoned most of my favorite pastimes.
<p>That looks pretty good! Great job! Have you thought about a finish? If you want to make it look like ebony, you could ebonize it with vinegar and steel wool (there are many instructibles about that) or you could try a stain. Or you could leave it natural. Whatever you decide to do, you definitely want to finish it with some oil. I use walnut oil or sweet (not bitter) almond oil. Don't use vegetable oil because it will rot, or so I have heard. I actually soaked mine in oil for several days. It will darken the wood and protect it from moisture. </p>
Will do! :)
This is incredibly helpful! Thank you so much!
amazing (;
do you have video of how it sounds?
I'm sorry, I don't. I don't actually know how to play it yet. :D It only has 9 notes (8 holes), and the highest two are really airy. Next time I will make it bigger, (to get lower notes) and give it a proper 10 or 12 holes.
Yes, very nice.
Beautiful.

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Bio: I am a TCK, which means I spent a lot of my childhood in a foreign country. Africa to be exact. I am currently making ... More »
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