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My wife has been asking me to put together a shoe rack for her for a while now so when I finally got fed up with the mountain of shoes in the closet... I came up with this. Inspired by a number of shoe racks she found on various photo blog sites, this is what I came up with. For us, I think its just about right. Now she wants a few more for the bedrooms.

Step 1: Plans

I always like to create a set of plans for any project I am doing. It helps to determine the amount of materials which will be needed. There are often slight deviations from the plans as determined appropriate throughout the project. I figured I would post this as the general dimensions remained consistent.

Step 2: Materials

The finished shoe rack required the following materials:

2 - 1x4x8 (Legs)
6 - 1x3x8 (Shelves)
1 - 2x2x8 (Shelf supports)
*Box of screws - 1-5/8"

Notes:

- I used general purpose pine lumber. Cost about $30 total for all materials.

- I intentionally stuck with material sizes which are commonly available at most lumber yards. I recommend doing this as often as possible.

* I used the screws in the picture. They are available at Lowe's for $10 a box. These are really great as the head doesn't strip and they are designed to reduce splitting of the wood.

Step 3: Prep Work

I find the fastest and easiest way to do projects like this is to cut all the materials to size and sort accordingly. Here is what you will need to cut:

4 - 1"x4"x28"
12 - 1"x3"x36"
6 - 2"x2"x12"

Thats about it! If you wanted a different size you would simply make the appropriate adjustments in length.

Step 4: Assembly

The assembly is the most crucial step to getting this project right... I started with the ends then tied it all together with the shelves.

Try to keep the measurements as accurate as possible with tolerances of less than +/- 1/16" to assure the final project is as square as possible.

Here is a step by step:

LEGS

- Gather all the pieces for one end (2 - 1x4's & 3 - 2x2's).
- Set all the pieces on the ground in the approximate arrangement of assembly with the 2x2's on the bottom and 1x4's on top.
- Position the end of the 2x2 flush with the edge of a 1x4. Maintain the the 'flushness' as you make the horizontal alignment.
- Set the bottom side of the 1x4 2-1/8" from the top of the 2x2. *I measured from this position so I could do so 'one-handed'.
- Measure the same length from the other side of the 1x4 to assure general alignment and place a screw in the outer end to hold the position. Recheck the alignment and insert the second screw.
- Do the same for the other leg.
- Install the top 2x2 measuring 2-1/8" from the top of the 1x4 to the top of the 2x2. Ensure flushness and alignment prior to inserting the screws and as necessary.
- Install the middle 2x2. The top of the middle 2x2 should be centered between the upper and lower 2x2's. The distance should be 11-1/2".
- Repeat for the other side.

SHELVES

This part is made much easier if you have a helper hold a leg for you while the shelving pieces.

- While the leg is positioned up right, position a shelf 'slat' flush on either the front or back and ensure its butted up tight against the leg. Insert two screws through the slat into the 2x2. Repeat on the other end.
- Install the opposing outer slat in a similar manner assuring flushness and the ends are butted up tight.
- Install the middle slats. I used a pencil as a spacer to assure even placement.
- Repeat for the middle and top shelves.

Thats it! Apply any finish you may desire or leave it natural like I did.

Step 5: Finished Product

I am really happy with this. Its not too heavy but is plenty durable for this application. This same shelf could be assembled with heavier materials with bigger sizes as your need may so require.

I have had multiple requests for these from my wife and friends on facebook. Apparently I am not the only one that struggled with too many shoes. Whether you wish to indulge these requests or just make your own and enjoy the envious reactions of your friends and family, Good Luck!
Made something very similar from some lengths of baton i was given and piece of leftover mdf from shelving project I had in the garage. Stained it for added protection from all those boots. As you say lightweight but robust, was really pleased.
Looks good. I'm thinking about doing built in closet shelves in a similar design. Will see how that goes.
<p>I used an old packing crate from work that had some water and sun aging.</p>
Yes it would... I saw several of those when exploring ideas for this... At the moment, I have no unused pallets but do have a few finished pallet projects I will be posting.<br><br>Btw... The shelves on this are actually reused bunk bed slats. Basically a slightly more refined 1x3.
<p>This would be a good pallet upcycle project.</p>

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