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This is a wooden spork I made for no practical reason at all. If you would like to see the build video, watch the build video above!

Step 1: DRAW OUT YOUR DESIGN

I started with a piece of very rough spalted wood that I thought would look amazing when it was complete. Make sure the thickness of the wood will accommodate the width of your spork....or FOON if you prefer. I just used a black marker for this. Don't worry, all your sketch lines will be cut and sanded away.

Step 2: CUT OUT YOUR CREATION

I used a bandsaw for this step. You can use a jig saw or even a coping saw if you love making things difficult for yourself. I simply cut out the profile of the spork.

Step 3: DRAWING AND CUTTING THE HANDLE

I used my trusty marker to sketch out a symmetrical (to the best of my ability) shape for the handle. Be sure not to draw it too thin. Remember, we still need to sand this sucker! That is going to remove even more material. This was a softer wood so I didn't want it to snap on me.

Step 4: SAND THE HECK OUT OF IT

Took the semi-spork shaped piece of wood to the belt sander. This is where things really start to come to life! Here you can round off the spoon shape and thin out the fork side. Don't forget to wear a dust mask, unless you want sawdust boogers.

Step 5: MARKING THE SPOON SIDE

I took a pencil and traced out a boundary of where I need to remove the material. You need to leave a little lip around the edges. This will help contain any liquid in the spoon. You don't want your tomato soup to dribble all over you nice new shirt now do you?

Step 6: REMOVE BULK OF MATERIAL

I used a small forstner bit in my drill to remove the bulk of the material. This will help me so I don't have to carve as much by hand. I was careful not to drill too deep.

Step 7: CONTOUR THE INSIDE

Now I can go in with a small gouge chisel to contour the bottom and help smooth out the inside. Take shallow cuts. If you take too deep of a cut and your chisel jumps off of the work piece, you hand will surely get in the way. Be sure to have lots of bandaids around.

Step 8: CUT THE PRONGS

I used a scroll saw for this. The small blade made this quick and precise. I first tried my bandsaw and the teeth were too aggressive for such delicate work.

Step 9: FINISH TIME!

I chose a food safe product, butcher block conditioner. This really brought out the grain. after a few coats, it was ready to go! I did notice that I needed to apply another coat after it had been used and washed a few times.

If you would like to see the build video or see the spork in action, click here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40hQM4lGgsk

<p>Sometimes you have to make things for 'no practical reason at all'!!!</p>
<p>I agree! I had the idea one day and just had to make it a reality. Thanks for watching</p>

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Bio: I enjoy making youtube videos about all the awesome projects I create. Please follow the link above and check the videos out. Thanks!
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