loading
I wanted a workbench/utility table for a while now, when I got this idea of using two pallets for legs and one pallet on top to create the work surface. I then used four bar clamps to keep the structure together. You can of course place another piece of wood on top of the horizontal pallet to form a seamless work surface, or fill in the gaps with other wood planks. I have left mine as is to use the gaps between the planks to aid with holding beams in place when sawing. In the pictured arrangement there four shelves right underneath the work surface to place tools in. In the pallets I have sourced there is a notch in the back end of the shelves that will keep things from rolling out and falling out. That might be something to notice if you have a selection of pallets to choose from.

The workbench can be disassembled for storage, as it takes up less space when the three pallets are stored vertically. It can also be reclamped in different configurations to change the height of it or change the structure's function completely. As it stands now it is 85cm tall.


Further improvement ideas

• As it is now the table is pretty stable for most uses. If however force is applied horizontally, perpendicular to the pallets that form the legs, it does move a bit. This might be rectified with bigger bar clamps, although those will be taller than the wood planks on the work surface and that might not be desirable.

• Use another four clamps to hold horizontally crossing the clamps that are clamped vertically. But that will bring the cost up if you do not have clamps that you can spare. A variation to this idea is to wedge planks in between the "legs" and the middle bottom plank of the top pallet to hopefully reduce movement.

• Using a fourth pallet and placing it upside down on the bottom of the structure and clamping it (or wedging it) as the top one might also provide additional stability.

• After reading Mr_Liss' comment the following idea emerged: Looking at the table from the side where the clamps are, a piece of wood can be bolted to the "cube" which has EUR branded on it, on the left side of the left clamp, and continue down to the right leg to be fastened on the bottom right "cube". That will form a right angle triangle where one side is the top horizontal pallet, then right angle down to the right vertical pallet and the aforementioned piece of wood would be the hypotenuse of the triangle. Then the opposite can be done on the other side. The table should be solid as a rock by that point. If there still is some sway then another piece of wood to form an X could be added where there would be no room for movement. In addition to removing the clamps in favour of using t nuts on one end and perhaps butterfly nuts or bolts to connect parts together. Thank you Mr_Liss!



Please do share any ideas that can make this workbench better. I have not tested any of the improvement ideas myself so I cannot comment on their effectiveness. The idea behind it is a simple fast and cheap way of getting a workbench that can be disassembled if needed and/or reconfigured for other uses easily, and more importantly without tools, nails or screws!
those sides are begging to be converted into open bins/boxes for tools or parts! A few flower troughs or even a bottom made from deck bits of another pallet would be perfect!
stellar idea! I would simply create a few drop-in braces to lock it all in place and save your clamps for the work you do on the bench. Simple letter E shaped brace will be good.
<p>This is not bad! What I think could be improved about it (things you already have noticed) would be: </p><ul><li> some sort of bracing between the 'leg' pallets at the bottom, to reduce 'sway'<li> fill in the gaps in the top surface</ul><p>I'm not big on ideological purity - &quot;... without tools, nails, or screws&quot;. Tools are good! Think bolts, washers &amp; nuts instead of nails and screws. I feel that perfection is the enemy of the good. If you want to keep this easy to disassemble, fasten the component parts with drilled holes, nuts, bolts &amp; washers, so that you can tear down and reassemble quickly. Think Ikea! For stability, figure out ways to incorporate new parts that when added form right angled triangles, because triangles are very strong. Mitered cuts of wood, 45 degrees at each end, placed judiciously here and there, would add much needed stability. </p>
<p>The project is not about ideological purity od against tools, or so I think. But it is about starting from scratch : now @bad pixel has a makeshift provisional bench to build the real one on which he will make all the other furniture for his workshop.</p>
Thank for your input! The nuts and bolts idea is great! using t nuts on one end and maybe butterfly nuts or bolts to connect parts together. <br><br>After reading through the rest of your comment i came up with the following idea. Looking at the table from the side where the clamps are, a piece of wood can be bolted to the &quot;cube&quot; which has EUR branded on it, on the left side of the left clamp, and continue down to the right leg to be fastened on the bottom right &quot;cube&quot;. That will for a right angle triangle where one side is the top horizontal pallet, then right angle down to the right vertical pallet and the aforementioned piece of wood would be the hypotenuse of the triangle. Then the opposite can be done on the other side. The table should be solid as a rock by that point. If there still is some sway then another piece of wood to form an X could be added where there would be no room for movement.<br><br>I will actually paste this in the instructable itself, with credit to your comment of course, in case somebody does not read the comments!<br><br>Thank you again for your input!
<p>They all tell to keep it simple : YOU DID IT !!!&hellip;</p>
<p>Thank you :)</p>
<p>Who on Instructables doesn't need a sturdy workbench at some time or another? This is a very clever idea - simple, cheap, strong, and collapsible. Nicely done!</p><p>To follow up on Mr_Liss's idea, one or two squares of scrap plywood screwed to one or both ends of the vertical pallets could be used to stiffen it as well, and you wouldn't have to use 2 wood braces to form an X on the end. (You could draw an X on the plywood if you wanted ;-) In keeping with your quick and portable theme, I was trying to think of a way to attach the plywood or diagonal braces with clamps, but I'm drawing a blank. Maybe someone else will figure it out?</p><p>Also, where did you find that vise you have clamped to the table top? that looks pretty handy.</p><p>Cheers!</p>
That would also work, yes! I have some other ideas for making it sturdy using clamps but they would require a long clamp that would expensive, still working on refining it! Now you gave me another thing to think about! :) I will update the instructable later with your comment in case someone does not read the comments. Thank you for your input!<br> <br> As for the vice, it is an <a href="https://www.google.com.cy/search?q=stanley+706&rlz=1C1CHMO_enCY521CY521&espv=210&es_sm=122&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=Ykr_UrasNYijtAbN7oCIDQ&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1920&bih=1109#q=stanley+702&tbm=isch&imgdii=_" rel="nofollow">old Stanley vice</a> of my Dad's. I &quot;borrowed&quot; it some years ago :)
so simple, so easy, so brilliant, certainly qualifies as a 'kiss' project. cheers.
<p>Thank you! KISS was the main idea behind it :)</p>
<p>Finally, a clever design using pallets!</p>
<p>Thank you very much for your comment and the patch!</p><p>----------</p><p>Muchas gracias por tu comentario y por el parche! :)</p>

About This Instructable

32,054views

247favorites

License:

More by bad pixel:Secret book - Polaroid album compartment Workbench made with 3 pallets, no tools, no nails, no screws Motorised LEGO adjustable tablet cradle 
Add instructable to: