loading
My small lofted apartment in Chicago is often purposely minimal to prevent too much clutter. However, when you enter the 700ft2 apartment, there is a small pocket (seen below) that leads towards the bathroom and storage space. Currently, the space is awkwardly being used- not enough furniture is available to fill it, but there's also too much clutter (as it functions as my workspace) from projects. The space also has the unique challenge of needing to be able to hold my bicycle. Because of my urban location, and the inevitable destruction that a Chicago winter has on a bike left outdoors, my bicycle has no choice but to stay inside. 

But the space has so much opportunity. There's a massive window that pours in north light and great views of the city, there's a a beautiful hardwood floor, and there's enough room to do something when planned out efficiently.

What I'd like to do is incorporate a large shelving unit that wraps the window and has a secondary function as a small, makeshift window seat. Along the right side of the window, I'd incorporate alternating shelves to store even more books and workspace essentials. My storage doors that swing out could be replaced with frosted glass sliding doors to increase the available space to work with. A desk could be put parallel to these new sliding doors to give the room a bit more depth. A small rug underneath would create a bit more comfort than the cold hardwood floor while I work. The bicycle could be hung on a small ceiling hook, mounted into a ceiling joist near the window; the rear wheel could rest on the edge of the bookcase for added stability. Given the amount of stairs I climb with the bicycle on my arm everyday, I don't mind having to lift it up this high if it means more space. Lastly, the shoe clutter could be fixed by using a few of the openings in the lower bookshelf. 
Congratulations on your win! It was very well-deserved. I can't wait to see the "after" picture; it is going to look amazing!
I love how you laid out the room! What program did you use to do that? It is so effective.
I actually laid out the room by sketching it by hand in pen and paper. Then I took a photo of the empty room into Illustrator and sketched it in 3D using the perspective grid tool and just eying out what seemed right. Giving the drawing an 85% opacity at the end helped to give it a less permanent, more sketchy-appearance.<br><br>Thanks for the great comments!
I really like your planning approach, coupling the room photo and your design ideas. Here's hoping your implementation goes well, I look forward to seeing it. :)
+1

About This Instructable

5,332views

20favorites

License:

Bio: Designer
More by NHLavalanche:Connect: A Reverse Gallery Salted Oatmeal White Chocolate Cookies Workspace Renovation & Reorganization 
Add instructable to: