As everyone knows the Xbox one does not currently have an adapter for using older headsets.  So what can we do.  We can make one out of the existing headset supplied with the system.

I tested it with Astro A40's and it works great

A bit of extra info

How hard is this to do?
If you can solder this is pretty simple.  If you can't, well it's still simple.

**********For those who originally tied the black and bare wire, please desolder the black wire and tape it up.  It should not be used in this configuration.  It's providing 1V and I was essentially shorting it to ground, which caused my battery to drain rather fast.

thanks to turbotboz for this info.













Schritt 1: Items Needed

Here's what you need

- Official Xbox One Headset
- 2.5mm Stereo Inline Jack (Mode Electronics 24-271-1 or similar) It cost about $2 from my local electronics parts store
- Soldering Iron
- Solder
- Torx T5 or T6 screwdriver depending on headset. Some were installed with T5 and others T6
- Hot Glue Gun (optional)
  











Schritt 2: Headset Teardown

Technically you can just cut the wire and solder it to the connector but I wanted to keep the strain relief that was part of the wire
You can follow the pictures, they should be in order
1) Remove the foam from the earpiece (it's like a sock that slips over the earpiece)
2) Remove the 3 T6 screws from the earpiece and pull off the black plastic piece that the screws were holding
3) Remove the heat shrink that is on the exposed bare wire, and the heat shrink in the white wire
4) Carefully desolder the blue, black, white and bare wire.
5) Remove the 4 T6 screws holding the green plastic piece, and remove the green plastic piece.
6) Gently Pull/Pry the strain relief/wire out of the headset (this may take a bit of pressure, also if you are prying it be careful not to cut through the strain relief).
7) Done go take a break 









I am having a problem where the Mic only works when half way plugged into the 2.5m jack. Any ideas?
Figured out the echo issue! I connected the Black cable and cast off the Blue cable, a switch to what all the guides are saying, and it works perfectly! My friends don't hear their own voices anymore and sound is clear both ways. Thanks for the guides!
<p>Hey Skegatron, follow up and let us know if you managed to get them to work on the Siberian V2's. I have the Siberian V2's that are Xbox 360, PC, and PS3 compatible. I did a quick first run and didn't get them to work. I plan to spend some time on them to figure it out.</p><p>One thing to note, I have been able to get game audio through my headset just working on the mic. I connected some RCA cables (red and white) to the audio output of my t.v. and thats how I got game audio. If anyone has any other methods please share.</p>
I've just about given up on this. I've tried with three different cables, splice and solder, black to ground and not. Chat works both ways but my friends STILL have their own voices echo back at them and can hear the volume control beeps. This suggests to me that the sound-in signal is some how making its way to the mic-out signal. How is this possible?
<p>For those of you who are too squeamish to do this, Microsoft is releasing an adapter in March:</p><p><a href="http://www.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-one/accessories/headsets/stereo-headset-adapter#fbid=tmbIPPb7HNh" rel="nofollow">Link</a></p>
<p>I assume that this process will work with the Siberian V2's. Considering they use a 2.5mm jack. Theoretically it is the same, will let you know how it goes. </p>
<p>Anyone know how to do this with Astro A50 Chat Cord? I was gonna follow this tutorial but the Astro A50 cord only has a Thick Copper Wire, and a Thin Blue Wire</p>
<p>i did this mod and found you for my turtle beach headsets x41s the mic (white) goes on the left and speaker (blue) goes on the right side. After doing it your way and not working I tested with a multimeter and found it goes the the opposite way. </p>
<p>There are two bare wires (ground) at the beginning when the headset is disassembled. Are those connected together or what happened to one of the grounding wires when soldering took place?</p>
Hey guys, I did this, soldered the wires into a 2.5mm male that I can plug into my turtle beach headset. Now the xbox one registers that I am talking (mic icon shows up while I talk) on screen, but I can't hear the other people talking. If I unplug the mic from the controller I can hear them again. Anybody have an idea what's wrong with my setup? <br> <br>Thanks for the great guide, BTW.
Your chat speaker ground is open. You'll need to ground it in order to hear chat.
<p>OK well I know how to ground it, but I don't get which wire that is. Is it the black one?</p><p>Thanks</p>
<p>You either didn't solder the bare wire (ground) correctly or the blue wire isn't soldered correctly to the plug. </p>
<p>I am now using a male 3.5mm plug, which goes into a stereo adapter, which goes into the plug from my turtle beach headset. I am 100% certain the ground is soldered properly, and the blue and white wires seem totally fine, but now the problem is reversed. I can hear the other people, but the xbox doesn't hear me talking at all now. I assume this should mean there's a problem with the white wire, so I touched it up a few times, but each time I still got no response from the xbox. I am usually good with this kind of thing but right now, I am simply stumped...</p>
<p>Something has to be wrong with the connection or maybe even a bad connector. Do you have a multimeter to test out the continuity of the plug? </p>
So, I've been trying this for the past day, with absolutely no avail. I realized I'm using a 3.5mm female plug instead of a 2.5mm plug because my local store only had 3.5s in stock, but would that make a difference? <br> <br>Also, I've taken to burning the coating off the wires as they're too small for any wirestripper I have, but the only way I can get it to seemingly work is to plug it in almost all the way. If I push it until it &quot;clicks&quot; the microphone won't pick up. But if I pull it out just a bit, both Mic and Speakers work, but the headset also outputs what I'm hearing through my microphone as well. I'm not sure why I'm having so much trouble as everyone else seems to say &quot;It's just 3 quick solders,&quot; so maybe it is the fact that I'm using a 3.5 instead of a 2.5. If I can find one, I suppose I'll try that, but as of right now, I'm slowly running out of cable.
3.5mm is fine instead of 2.5, it should be more durable to boot, see my post above. As for stripping the enamel coating what I do is melt some solder on the tip of the iron, put a heatsink clip one the enamel wire (to prevent damage to the rest of the wire insulator), and work the end back and forth through the molten solder. You'll be able to see the enamel bubble off. Then you can just clean the dirty solder off the iron, tin the wire and solder it onto the pad. use a voltmeter to test continuity to ensure solid connections.
Thanks for the post. I've managed to get things sorted out for the most part, except I'm experiencing that echo you mentioned that results from not &quot;grounding the speaker to the common.&quot; <br> <br>My apologies, as most things electrical are not my forte, but could you explain what you mean by this? Should I connect the two wires at some point?
Yes. I figured this out with a lot of troubleshooting. The stock XBONE chat speaker isn't grounded, it's connected to HPL. In order to use an aftermarket speaker the speaker wire needs to be grounded. This means at some point the speaker ground and mic ground from the headset need to be combined and grounded to the first pad on the headset circuit board. For my aftermarket headset I didn't have to do this, but in order to reuse the stock XBONE chat headset, I had to ground the speaker and the mic. Your headset might need to have the same done.
Awesome. Thanks for your help and the reply. I'll try this out later today and see if I can finally get it to work.
I added an instructable for the 3.5mm jack in case you or anyone else need more pictures or details. <br> <br>http://www.instructables.com/id/Xbox-One-35mm-Headset-Adapter-Warlord-version/ <br> <br>Thanks again to octanechicken (and many, many others) who contributed their know how.
I am also using a 3.5 female...what color were your wires and which did you connect to what...thanks
I went to Radioshack and bough a 2.5mm male to 3.5mm female and stripped it and had the following wires: Red, Black, Brown. I took apart the adapter and kept the female part and soldered like this: Gnd=Black Mic=Red HPR=Nothing HPL=Brown...I plugged it into my controller and the volume indicator sounded also the mute button worked but didn't hear anyone chat nor did my mic work...I then did it all over again with the following Gnd=Black Mic=Brown HPR=Nothing HPL=Red and still nothing worked...can someone help me out please!!!!
You cut an audio wire adapter in half. Black isn't always ground in audio cable, but red is usually right.. If you have a voltmeter test the continuity between the wire ends and the jack end. Ground is the wire with continuity to the jack end. <br> <br>The red is ring and right, screen to ground, and the tip is what's left. <br>
up
Sorted it, to seems mic must be on tip not ring. And I'm not using the a40 chat cable with op amp. Nice guide.
Hi guys, I have a question or two about this. I have just soldered a 2.5mm male plug with a length of cable to the x1 puck. Should the 2.5mm connections be as follows: tip=blue(audio), ring=white(mic), ground=bare. Also do I need to use my chat cable that came with my astro A40 amp (I think it has an op amp of some kind in line). <br> <br>Originally I wired a 2.5 socket which did not work using the original a40 chat cable. I can provide pics if needed. Thanks.
Also which is better - the method in the guide or cdarnell1 method. <br> <br>Thanks <br>
As for the method to use.. It is your call. If you are good at soldering I would say use my method. But soldering directly to the PCB is risky if you don't have the experience needed and can ruin your board easily if you do it wrong. I did it this way because it was a more reliable connection and it was one less connector to go bad and cause static.
Hi, im going to try this tonight with my astro a40's but one thing is confusing me. THE BLACK WIRE I dont understand why you would tape this if it is the right channel sound, surely it would be better to not tape this and have two channel sound. Is this right? I dont get why you wouldn't. Thanks to the dude that made this. Great work
The chip in the black puck was made for stereo sound and the stock headset has a special speaker that makes use of both channels but all of the astros, turtle beach, and trittons only make use of one channel so there is no way to connect the black wire to make the headsets make use of it.
I decided to redo what i did before and instead of adding a connector to the stock wires I just soldered an existing 3.5mm plug wire from my Trittons to the board. It looks much cleaner and no more static because of a bad connection at the cable. I was able to keep the cable strain relief on the end.
I followed the process with a 3.5 mm male stereo jack for my trittons headsets and it didn't quite work. My solder points are really good. However when I push the jack all the way in I cannot hear or speak. But when I ease jack out a little I can hear but still cannot speak. I got bare to ground, blue to ring and white to tip. I don't know what I did wrong. I could use some help
I was curious if there was the same color wires in the wire you used from your headset?
No. I used a continuity tester on my multimeter to determine what wires did what. I had a white, green, and bare wire in my tritton wire that I used. I know that the tip of the connector is for the mic, the middle is for the speaker, and the last is for the ground.
thanks. needa sorta figure how to do that then.
Well if you have any questions just ask. If you have soldered before, it is pretty easy to solder the wires directly on the PCB. It makes it a more reliable connection but I will warn you that it is very easy to miss something and melt a component that will make your whole board inoperable.
Thanks for all the help. Got it working on my TurtleBeach XP400 wireless :D
Thanks. Soldering shouldn't be a problem. Done a lot of small circuit board jobs before. The only thing I'm not sure about is just figure out which wire goes to which what part. I did find a youtube vid about which wires goes to what part, though I was thinking about grabbing a random headset wire to try out.
I'm actually gonna try to do this for my xp400
This didn't solve the problem of bad feedback whenever the controller is wired with a USB cable. Doesn't anybody else have this problem? If not then I need to replace the controller ASAP <br>
I don't have this problem when my controller is connected. I'm going to put a stab at this but I'm guessing the ground connection may not be a solid connection.
I've had a few messages between a few other people from youtube about the buzzing and it seems a lot of people are having this issue. Not sure why. When I talk to somebody with it plugged in I just get a little feedback and he says it sounds like I'm in a pipe talking with a tunnel effect. Not sure why but my mic symbol isn't always on anymore either.
It's a solid connection. It's not touching anything else and I used heat shrink on the ground so it wouldn't touch anything else. The bare wire is soldered on the pad and seems pretty solid. I'm starting to think it might either be the controller, cable, or the usb port on the xbox. Never got a chance to test the stock headset while plugging it in to see if it is the mod of not.
I followed this tutorial and added a male 2.5mm jack. When I went to test it, I am hearing chat and am able to communicate through my Astro A40s. I am experiencing a problem when I hook up to my USB charger though. For now, I just plan to charge my controller when I do not have the puck plugged in. Can I bring any harm to my equipment by doing that?
Do you get loud feedback when you connect the controller to the USB cable when the puck is attached?
With the USB cable plugged into my controller, and my modded puck plugged into my Astro mixamp I see my mic icon constantly lit. I do not hear feedback in my headset, but I am sure I am emmitting some sort of awful sound to other people. None of my friends were online last night to tell me what sound was coming from my mic, but I wouldn;t doubt it being my mediocre solder job lol. My soldering iron was a little big for this job, but somehow I managed to pull it off.
mine does the same thing but I hear feedback as well. Mhmm... Not sure what is going on.
My setup differs from yours a little, I followed this tutorial and used the chat headset my XB1 came with. I wouldn't relate this issue to the controller, I would follow the advice I've seen octanechicken give many others and re-solder everything :) good luck!
I have had two different setups. The first one was just like this tutorial until I started getting static from the connector I had due to resoldering a couple times and it was just wearing out from the heat. The new one I just soldered a different wire from my Trittons to the puck PCB itself eliminating weak points. Both setups have the same problem of only hearing feedback when it is connected via USB. It sounds crystal clear otherwise. <br> <br>This is my old setup. Not sure how I can make the soldering job better. I used the same flux I use to clean up iPhone PCBs when I do water damage repairs and is high quality.

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Nov 23, 2013

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