Instructables

YeasTea Recipe

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Picture of YeasTea Recipe
"YeasTea", get it? It's tea fermented by yeast!

Now I am aware that kombucha is also a yeast fermented tea drink too; kombucha is actually what made me think about throwing some yeast into a pitcher of tea to start with. While both drinks do involve yeast and tea, YeasTea differs from kombucha because the kombucha culture is a symbiotic mass of multiple yeast strains and species of acetic acid bacteria, which results in the final drink having little to no alcohol (the bacteria gobble it up) but potentially all sorts of acids, and the YeasTea culture is nothing more than our good friend Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which (despite the fact that I'm using baker's yeast) results in a tea drink that's alcoholic but lacks (for the most part) the same variety of acids found in kombucha. 

To make a yourself a batch of YeasTea you'll need the following:

Kitchen Tools:

A sanitary glass vessel that can be sealed (I use a boiled mason jar)
A wooden spoon
A candy thermometer
Measuring Spoons:
 -1/8th tsp
-1 tbsp
A kettle or other means to boil water
A measuring cup
A 1/2 end volume container to brew tea in (you could just brew the tea in the same glass vessel the drink will ferment in, but I find it easier to use a separate vessel) 

Ingredients 

Water
1 tea bag/cup
1 tbsp sugar/cup
~1/8th tsp baker's yeast/4 cups

 
 
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Step 1: Brew the Tea

Picture of Brew the Tea
Boil water and make a batch of tea half the volume of your final intended batch size using 1 tea bag per final batch size cup. So, for example, if you want to make 4 cups of YeasTea, brew a batch of tea using 2 cups of water with 4 tea bags. Let the tea bags steep for between 10-20 minutes.

hey so i made this last night and added about 6 tbsp of sugar to make four cups and about a half tsp of bakers yeast, it is going crazy bubbling so i know it worked but i have a question, when should i stop the fermentation to have it be the most alcoholic?

jaycomic7 months ago

I was just wondering what the alcohol content is. Does it compare to a beer?

.......i have a bottle of bakers wine in basement that i am scared to consume...its been aging for 6 months........I'm sure its vinegar by now
20StoryLincoln (author)  betweenureyes2 years ago
Oh, ew. Maybe you could test to see if it's vinegar or not by checking its pH with something?
kretzlord3 years ago
just made my first batch. Think i used too much yeast at the beginning, though it may have increased the speed of fermentation. Not sure on alcohol level (though it is there). I added sugar when i bottled it and it has a nice light bubbly flavor, not too strong. I did filter through a coffee filter to get rid of most of the yeast when bottling, still have sediment however. Tasty and refreshing is my final word! Thanks for the idea
20StoryLincoln (author)  kretzlord3 years ago
Thanks, I'm glad it worked out well. You're also definitely right about the alcohol content thing; though I still haven't been able to get the stuff I need to actually figure it out, after doing some calculations using how much sugar I suggested to use the highest alcohol content possible would only be something like 3.4% by volume. Sorry about that.
zzickefoose3 years ago
Hey there... I'm a homebrewer... And the worst idea you can have is taking sugar, adding yeast, and cap it off. You need to allow the co2 put off by the yeast somewhere to go.

The danger of bottling beer is "beer grenades", which is terrifying when you open your cabinet and there is glass and beer every where.

Its an awesome idea, and I'm going to try it, but sanitize some tin foil and rubber band it onto your mason jar. That way you don't lose a hand.
20StoryLincoln (author)  zzickefoose3 years ago
Though generally I try to crack the cap a bit every once in awhile to prevent the pressure from the CO2 from building up too much I'll try out your tin foil suggestion in future batches. I've actually used tin foil before in capping off flasks in a micro lab and in some other yeastie experiments I briefly tried out, but for some reason it didn't occur to me to do that for this project. So thanks for pointing this out; not only will your suggestion likely save my hands but it'll also let me use a few large, lidless jars I have sitting around to try fermenting other stuff.
zzickefoose3 years ago
The yeast flavor your talking about could be diacetyl or sulfur, which is a by product of yeast produced by fermenting too high. I'd say allowing your tea to cool down to about 70 degrees before pitching your yeast :)
20StoryLincoln (author)  zzickefoose3 years ago
Okie dokie, I'll try that next time I make a batch. Thanks for the suggestion.
kretzlord3 years ago
awesome idea, any thoughts on final alcohol content as well as the possibility of using a champagne yeast? How does it taste?
20StoryLincoln (author)  kretzlord3 years ago
From what I gathered about baker's yeast while working on this, baker's yeast only has a normal alcohol tolerance of something between 5% and 10%, so if I had to guess I'd probably put it somewhere in that range at best. I do intend to eventually get a better guess about how much alcohol it has by comparing changes in a batch's density under varying conditions that should alter alcohol content, but at present I can't do this because I'm away on vacation I lack the tools I need to do what I plan right now.

Having only just recently gotten into brewing and what not, I also don't really know what influence on the flavor using champagne yeast instead of baker's would have, but based on what I know so far I'd have to guess that using champagne yeast would likely yield a product that contains more alcohol and less of a "yeastie" hint to it.

Overall it kind of tastes tea, but the yeast imparts this hard to describe flavor to it. I mean there might be a bit of a "yeastie" taste to it, sure, but there's something else to it that I can't really put my finger on. Again, if I had to guess, I'd say the extra flavor is from some of the yeast spilling out their insides after undergoing a bit of autolysis. Though it tastes pretty good straight, personally my favorite way to drink it is to mix in some vanilla soy milk (or plain milk) and sugar. I'm sorry for being a bit vague about the taste right now, but I'm going to be opening up a fresh batch tomorrow night most likely so maybe I'll be able to describe it better then.

Sorry for being so vague and so wordy; if you have any other questions please feel free to ask away.
thank you for the reply :). I really like your idea and hope to start my own batch soon
20StoryLincoln (author)  kretzlord3 years ago
Thanks, let me know how it turns out!