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Afghan bread, or Naan-e Afghani (Persian: نان افغانی), is the national bread of Afghanistan. The bread is oval or rectangular and baked in a tandoor, a cylindrical oven that is the primary cooking equipment of the sub-continental region. The Afghan version of the tandoor sits above ground and is made of bricks, which are heated to cook the bread. The bread, also known as naan, is shaped and then stuck to the interior wall of the oven to bake. Black cumin or caraway seeds are often sprinkled on the bread, as much for decoration as for taste, and lengthwise lines are scored in the dough to add texture to the bread.

Afghan bread is commonly stocked at Middle Eastern grocery stores in western countries. In Afghanistan the baker still cooks the bread the traditional way by spreading the dough around the tandoor, so that it quickly puffs up and starts to colour and emit a fresh bread smell that draws the early morning throngs of people. The baker then uses two long iron tongs to pull the bread from the tandoor wall. Afghans carry the bread in cloth bags. Similar to that in Arab countries, bread is served with most meals and is generally torn into shreds and used by those eating to envelope foods, so that they can be picked up and conveyed to the mouth, in a manner similar to a sandwich, and also to soak up liquids on the plate. Since people in Afghanistan normally use their hands to eat, the bread thus acts as both a fork and a spoon. The bread tastes similar to the Armenian lavash bread, as well as to Indian and Pakistani variants of naan bread. It has a dense and rich taste.

Step 1: Flat Bread Tawa Style

  1. make a round ball ( as in the picture)
  2. flat it in the plate
  3. flip it in ur hands to extend it.
  4. place in on the heating tawa
  5. apply a wet hand.
  6. let if cook

Step 2: Tandoor Style.

These kinds of ovens are used throughout the Middle East, India, Pakistan, and even parts of Central Asia and China. They can be large, permanent structures ensconced in a kitchen or outdoor area, or they can be smaller, portable ovens that can be carried from place to place. We're as fascinated by how they work as we are with the delicious foods they can make!

Regardless of size, shape, or region of origin, all tandoor ovens operate on essentially the same principle. The ovens are made of clay with some sort of insulating material like concrete or mud on the outside. They are cylindrical and often curve inward toward the top like a beehive or jug to concentrate the heat. A top opening left clear to allow access and ventilation.
A fire is built in the bottom, which heats both the walls of the oven and the air inside to upwards of 900° Fahrenheit! Before cooking, the fire is allowed to die down to coals so that the temperature remains consistent while food is cooked. Flatbreads like naan get slapped against the sides of the oven (as in the image above). They adhere to the super-heated surface, cook very quickly, and are peeled off when they're done. Meats are usually cooked on long skewers that are either inserted directly into the oven or cooked over the mouth of the oven. One of the biggest advantages of these ovens is that once they are heated, they will maintain a consistent high temperature for hours with very little additional fuel. This is a big plus in parts of the world where fuel is scarce.

<p>roti maker machine: make roti in 30sec<br>free home delivery in all pakistan<br>Price: 4999/pkr Only<br>contact: 0321-3001264 or visit: http:/telebrandpk.com/roti-maker</p>
<p>ad seriously?</p>
<p>If I could have my own tandoor oven and eat Afghan/Pakistsni/Indian/Persian EVERY DAY I would.<br><br>There is one tiny Indian take-away in my small Italian town and every time I eat there I get ill (Delhi-belly!) so I prefer to make my own :-)<br><br>Do you have an easy way to make paneer? </p>
<p>i will post that one *specially for you* =D</p>
<p>Thank You for the Tawa style.. Can you please update with the roti recipe...!</p>
<p>you mean how to make Pakistani roti?</p>
The recipe which you have used here... :)
<p>oh that is in process. I am trying to take all the images for the kneading and ingredients<br></p>
<p>Thank you waiting for that :) ... </p>
<p>Both of these look like they came out great! What recipe do you use?</p>
<p>recipe is in process</p>

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