Hen Saddle

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Introduction: Hen Saddle

My instructable for the egg contest!
what could be more related to eggs than chicken?

Make your hens happy and get delicious eggs as thanks.

chicken owners know about the issues of the roosters favourite lady - her back is bald.
here´s how to prevent that, protect the hen from sore, and helping the feathers grow back.

let me introduce the

HEN SADDLE!


Step 1: Materials


you'll need:

scissors
pins
thread
needle
sewing machine

fabric (jeans work great)
elastic rubber band
a mid-sized button

pattern


Step 2: Pattern

this pattern works for big chicken like Brahma or orpington.
you'll have to try out with a piece of paper if it fits on your hens.

Step 3: Folding the Fabric

fold your fabric once
you'll end up with with 2 layers

or:
fold your fabric twice so you can cut out 2 pattern at the same time
you'll end up wit.h four layers.

see the pictures

Step 4: Pin the Pattern to the Fabric


Now pin the pattern to the fabric
see the pictures for the position.

Step 5: Cut Out the Pattern

take your scissors an cut out the pattern.

you need 2 sheets of it.

Step 6: Pin the Sheets Together


pin the sheets (inside out ) together.

Step 7: Sew It Together


now the sewing part comes in.

sew ca. 0,2inches from the sides.

sew around but leave an opening so you can turn the inside ut later see the pictures where to start and to end.

Step 8: Turn Inside Out


turn the inside out trough the opening you left.

close the opening by sewing it .

Step 9: Add Elastic Band

add the elastic rubber band - depending on the band you're using stretch it a little before sewing it on. ( if it's very elastic stretch it more while you're sewing)

secure the band with a stitched cross - it has to be really sturdy!

Step 10: Add the Button


now sew the button in the middle of the saddle (see picture)  with needle an thread

you'll need the button for fitting adjustments on the hen.
- the rubber band is wrapped around it to shorten it

Step 11: Fashion Week

get your hen dressed :)
if shes got sore you may add some ointment first.

secure and adjust the elastic band by wrapping it around the button.
not too tight not too loose - the hen shoul be comfortable with it.

the first 20 minutes they try to get rid of the saddle but then they get used to it.

the rooster can still fulfill his duties and everyone is happy :)

Step 12: Pedicure for the Rooster


to prevent your hens from sore you can give the rooster a pedicure.

pick him at night from the roost - it's easyier than trying to catch him at daylight :)
you should have a headlamp - the rooster is stays calm this way because he can't see anything.

then take a file and hone the claws round - but only a little bit!!!
if you're not sure where the blood vessles end don't do it.


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90 Comments

lol imagine if a bunch of chipmunks were riding those like horses and charging a person who abuses animals like a cavalry unit! Lol!

hahahaha - what a cool sight :o)

Overly horny roosters can be a problem. Some of our hens actually got sunburned after their feathers got worn off. I preferred ducks to chickens. They were a lot more sociable and they didn't do damage to the garden. They just went after the bugs. But the chicken eggs were better.

yeah chicken are rude and cruel animals.
can't have ducks though - it's to cold in the winter.

How cold? Ducks do well in the winter because they have down (unlike chickens.) In fact, the down gets thicker in the winter -- if you're keeping the down, "harvest" the ducks when it's good and cold so the down has thickened up. (It takes a lot of ducks for down though -- we made a crib comforter with 7 ducks' worth and it's pretty thin! One goose made a nice fluffy crib pillow though.)

We're in the Bay Area, which doesn't even freeze hardly, but even so, the ducks played in the rain all winter long, happy as clams!

Look into it for your area, but I doubt you'd have much trouble keeping ducks in the winter.

Kiki

we have about -22°F in winter , and the winter is quite long.
snow period is from november until april.
all the wild ducks are leaving in october and all the lakes are frozen completely from december to may.

We ive in Canada under about the same condition as your northern Sweden sounds like. My friend has kept ducks for many years. They are a happy crowd, the winters dont face them. They are very messy though and their barn gets stinky very fast. They dont mind.......lol!! Duck eggs are my personal favourite, they have a nicer taste! She raised Khaki and I think Emdens. They are really happy when it is rainy out. Very funny to watch them truck around in the puddles and creek, obviously in high spirits because of the pouring rain!

Hey there Midsummernight
But the ducks would like to have open water - i guess
I am always wondering what i would like if I were the chicken/ rabbit/ cat or whatever - and thats exactly what they get ;D

The Chicken have 4 sqm full with dry dirt that they can take their dirt-bath even in winter or when it's rainy in summer - also they have a very big coop - it's a lot easier to keep them from attacking each other, because they are less bored and can avoid ech other

the rabbits are kept in a Oversized cage with the possibility to "mow" my yard :D I couldn't keep them in these small cages with a clean conscience.

And the ducks should have some sort of open water even in winter- thats at least my "fantasy" :)



Umm, how exactly do you harvest a duck, do you cut of the feathers or what?

"Harvest" is a nice way to say, "process" or "make table-ready" or, well, "behead and pluck." Harvesting doesn't mean harvesting the feathers. I pluck feathers only from no-longer-living ducks. It's less painful that way. At least the plucking part. :->

Kiki -- actually, with a very sharp, fast tool, I doubt "harvesting" is that painful at all