Hexagon piecing is super easy and fun! It's a great craft to do while hanging out on the couch, and it's extremely portable, so you can craft pretty much anywhere! :D

You can use the sewn hexagons for all sorts of things: patches on clothes, as applique on other sewn goods, as a quilt top, as placemats, as garlands, etc.

In this tutorial I'll go over how to sew the individual hexagons and how to sew them together - keep reading and prepare to get addicted.

Paso 1: What you'll need:

  • quilting weight cotton
  • needle
  • thread
  • hexagon template
  • cardstock
  • scissors

I'm not including a template file here because they're everywhere online. This time I found one at Tim van de Vall's website - you can access his templates here. He has loads more templates too - you should click around. Template heaven!!

I'm using 3 inch hexagons - they're my favorite size and perfect for beginners. (The smaller ones can be so fiddly!)

Before you get started, you'll want to print out some hexagon templates. Make sure your printer is printing at 100% and not scaling the size of the image in a weird way.

I prefer to use cardstock for the templates because it's easier to sew the hexagons when they're more rigid - and you can reuse the cardstock for the next round! :)

Paso 2: Prepping for sewing

Once you have your templates, you'll want to prep some fabric!

Iron all your fabric first - it's important that it be unwrinkled so the hexagons sew nicely.

There are a couple different ways to cut your fabric:

  1. Cut the fabric into a hexagon, leaving 1/4 - 1/2 inch all around the edges
  2. Or cut a square of fabric one inch larger than your template

I always go for squares! It's much faster and doesn't really add bulk. Since I'm using a three inch hexagon template, I cut four inch squares.

If you're able, but the squares out using pinking shears or a rotary cutter fitted with a pinking blade. Guarding yourself against unraveling fabric is always good :D

<p>beautiful</p>
<p>Where did you get your material? I love the color scheme, it's fantastic!</p>
<p>Thank you for a more simple way of showing how to do this! Piecing has always intimidated me and someday I would love to make a quilt with hexagons. </p><p>Probably a silly question here but, have you made a quilt with your hexagons?</p>
<p>Nope! I'm not patient enough. I normally just use them for smaller projects or as applique. :D</p>
I understand! I'm the type who wants to see a finished project NOW! ~.^<br>I think when winter sets in, I'm going to start a hexy quilt. <br>Something in deep, dark jeweltones. <br>And if I get impatient - I'll turn it into a quilt for a grand child lol<br>Thanks again Jessy :D
<p>The Amherst College archives have some of these hexagons, sewn by Emily Dickinson. You can see her writing on the paper inside.</p>
<p>Awesome footnote! I am totally going to look into this :)</p>
<p>Here -- </p><p><a href="https://www.amherst.edu/library/archives/holdings/edickinson/new_daguerreotype" rel="nofollow">https://www.amherst.edu/library/archives/holdings/...</a></p><p>Scroll down a bit, to see the hexes.</p>
<p>Thank you!!</p>
<p>That is a fabulous anecdote about Emily Dickinson! </p><p>I have to try one of these hexagon quilts. I have only ever made regular quilts. Thank you, jessy, for sharing your technique in such clear and lovely photographs.</p>
<p>Oh I wish I had seen this 10 years ago. I spent a couple of years piecing hexagons for a quilt top from old childhood clothes. But I did not know your fabulous method and it was never even or neat - I only used the cardstock to cut them out. I think I will try some for pillow covers or hot pads. Thank you!</p>
<p>This really fits the teach it contest! Thanks loads. I have seen patchwork quilts like this, but never thought that I could do it as it seemed so difficult. I just have to share this!</p>
<p>Thanks for posting this awesome idea.I will do it with thick felt so that I can wash.</p>
<p>Wow Awesome!</p>

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Ago 18, 2014

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Bio: I make things at Instructables! I like embroidering, eating, jrpgs and inexplicably cute animals. // follow me for even more tutorials: https://twitter.com/makingjiggy https ...

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