its easy, try it!

Step 1: first,

Take the motor and pry the end cap off with a flat head screwdriver.
the title should say - how to behave like an oxymoron...
Out of curiosity, why would one want to do this?
im a nerd, why would a nerd do it, for the heck of it
thats the best way ive ever heard&nbsp; it<br />
that was cool <br />
what kind of motor is this, and how much do they cost?
pretty cheap, about $2 from wher i get them, you can get a 12 pack with alot of different kinds for $20. the motor is just a regular ol' motor, they are in almost all toys.
You can also "rebuild" electric motors and know very little about electricity, how to re-wrap a coil that is burned in two and not counting the loops, by clipping all the copper off "1 winding at a time" and saving it to "weigh it" then measuring its AWG or thickness, then you can calculate how much wire is used, buy and re-wrapping the coil using the same method as it was wrapped till you run out of wire,simple. Replacement brushes/wire can be bought at most electrical supply houses. and if using hobby motors it is good to experiment with capacitor and resistor effects on motor circuits too. learn a little about "PWM" "Make sure you buy enameled wrapping wire though!" you probably wont need this much, I do alot of repairs and sometimes you just cant replace the motor.
This should mention somewhere that it's a 130 size motor, common in small toys/devices. Other motors have different tab placements and shapes etc etc, and some have screws instead of tabs. You might want to do this to put in stronger magnets, different gauge wire for the armature, cleaning, etc etc.
You didn't pull the brushes back up over the commutator. It wont work this way and you may have bent the springs.
i tried, it works
this is just a small hobby motor, it doesn't have any of that.
Actually, this motor does have brushes, they just take the form of copper strips that extend from the end bell to the commutator. They're actually designed in such a way that they'll slide up onto the commutator without having to be manipulated much, so you don't have to worry about pulling them onto the commutator.
its just an armature with copper wires wrapped around, there is no brushes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I can assure you, it does have brushes. It is <em><strong>physically impossible</strong></em> for a motor of this design (with the electromagnets on the armature and permanent magnets in the case) to work without brushes.<br/><br/>The brushes are very small and could easily be mistaken for something else, but they are there.<br/><br/>Brushless motors do exist, put they have permanent magnets on the armature, and electromagnets in the case. They also need a microchip to control them.<br/>
your right because on the cap where the axle is put the brushes are attached to the cap
im sorry, upon further inspection of my motors, i realized that you are right, it does have brushes. they are in the cap, i didn't understand the terms you were using, such as <em>BRUSHES&quot;.</em><br/>
and i didnt bend the brushes, and it works. usually, i lift up the brushes and put them back over, but i figured out that they slide on they're own with a little push.
its a knex motor and turn that flash of when you take picture of something like that
i did the same thing at science camp exept i threw the motor against a wall lol.
it's a generator not a motor
its a hobby motor
please rate
Cool! Now if only you could tell us how to rewind coils on industrial motors...
My uncle does that for earning his life! Heck of a job. Lots of diagrams and custom work for every single motor... K.
Cool! Instructable?
i'll work on it
I've done this before. Very easy. :P Nice job, the pictures could be a bit more better, but I still get the idea.
thanks 4 the encouragement, appreciate it.

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