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Cinnamon ornaments are a cheap and easy holiday craft to do with kids. Plus, they make your house smell AWESOME. They make great gifts during the holidays, too!

In this instructable I'll share my basic recipe for cinnamon ornaments and how to make them. I've left mine plain, but you can paint them, add glitter, or spray them with a polyurethane spray paint to make them glossy.

Just make sure no one tries to take a bite of one. They won't be too excited afterward. :D

Step 1: Ingredients + Tools

  • 1 cup ground cinnamon (around a 4-5 oz container)
  • 3/4 - 1 cup applesauce
  • 2 tablespoons white glue
  • wax paper
  • parchment paper
  • baking sheet
  • cookie cutter and/or x-acto knife
  • red food coloring (optional, but darkens them a little bit!)
  • string or wire for hanging
  • skewer, straw or another item to punch holes in the ornaments

This amount of ingredients will make around 15 inch ornaments - mine were all about 3x3 inches in size.

You can omit the glue if you don't have any on hand - it just adds a little stability and allows the dough to be a bit easier to work.

Step 2: Mix Together the Cinnamon Dough

Combine everything in a bowl (start with 3/4 cup applesauce) and mix with a spoon until the cinnamon begins to get wet and darken.

Use your hands to press the dough together - if it stays together with minimal crumbling, you're good to roll it out.

If it's still pretty crumbly, add a little more applesauce bit by bit until the dough comes together well. Picture two shows the dough when it needs a little more applesauce - picture three is a well incorporated dough. :D

(If it's being grumpy even after adding a cup of applesauce, let it rest for a few minutes and try again. Sometimes the cinnamon needs a little time to absorb all the liquid.)

Step 3: Roll Out the Dough

Place the dough on a piece of wax paper and cover with another piece of wax paper. This will let you roll it out without it sticking. :)

Try to get it right around 1/4 inch thick. If the ornaments get much thinner, they'll be a bit brittle.

Step 4: Cut Out Your Ornaments

You can use cookie cutters, freehand them with a knife, or use templates and a knife. Make sure to punch holes in them as you go - trying to make holes after they've baked is near impossible.

Put a piece of parchment paper on a baking sheet and lay the ornaments on there as you cut them out so you don't have to move them too much!

If you want, you can also use your fingers to smooth the sides of them - they can look a little fuzzy after cutting sometimes due to the apple flesh. :)

Step 5: Bake and String!

You'll want to bake these in a 200 F oven for 2-3 hours, turning after every hour. Your house is about to smell amazing!

Because it's been so rainy here lately it took me about three hours to get these to dry out all the way - humidity will play a big role in getting them to dry. :)

Your ornaments will be done once they're rock hard - if they're squishy at all in middle, leave them in.

Once they're dry, loop a piece of string or wire through the hole to hang them with. Enjoy!

P.S. You can also dry these at room temperature, but it can take forever. Days, sometimes. If you'd like to dry the ornaments at room temp, lay them on paper towels on top of a baking rack until they firm up, then remove the paper towels and keep drying on the rack.

<p>are these sturdy enough to make a gingerbread house out of</p>
<p>Definitely! They harden up really well. :)</p>
I'm wondering if you could swap out the Cinnamon for pumpkin pie spice and make turkey ornaments
<p>That is a great idea! Going to do some of those along with Christmas ones this weekend now that I found this idea and your comment thank you both</p>
<p>Wow that is a fabulous idea to me.. I can not see why you couldn't. Experiment and let me know</p>
<p>if I want to paint them should I do before baking or after?</p>
<p>After! You'll want them to be super dry before you paint. :)</p>
They are awesome
<p>First time I made these was with my daughters when they were 5 and 11 yrs old. Now they are 29 &amp; 35 and we still have those old ornaments! And yes, they STILL smell great and no mold or any issues at all. </p><p>One great way to decorate them is to use puff paint (in small bottles..made for fabrics).</p><p>We made a few gingerbread boys &amp; girls then used white puff paint to outline the gingerbread kids. </p><p>I've never baked mine but let them air dry instead. Just flip them over daily, and use baker racks. </p><p>If there is any leftover dough just roll it into small balls and let them dry, then toss them into any Fall and/or Yule scented potpourri you have. </p><p>My youngest daughter (the 29 yr old!) and her 2 yr old daughter and I will be making some more in the next day or two. </p><p>One Yule tradition we never get tired of!</p><p>Merry Yule Jessy!</p><p>I wish you &amp; yours the best of seasons - and a great New Year! </p>
<p>Oh, I love these! Thanks for sharing! I'll have to hit the dollar stores for cinnamon, as I would like to make many of these. Adorable!</p>
<p>I had fun making these with my kids this weekend. Thanks for the recipe.</p>
<p>I made these this weekend with my girlfriend and they smell awesome! It's my first Christmas on my own so I really needed some cheap ornaments so they really did the job. We baked them up on Saturday night (with the whole house smelling like cinnamon!) and then decorated yesterday. This morning when I walked into my living room all I could smell was pine and cinnamon! I'll have to post a picture when I get home.</p>
<p>I love that you hung them with baking twine! So perfect.</p>
<p>Hmmm.... Now I'm wondering, if I make them without the glue, can I eat them?</p>
<p>You really wouldn't want to. It would be like taking a hard, crunchy cinnamon challenge. ;)</p>
<p>I've never made them, so I'll take your word for it. I actually had never heard of them until last year. Maybe because my mom wasn't really a fan of using food as ornaments. I used to eat cinnamon bark for a snack when I was a kid, but it probably isn't quite as crunchy.</p>
<p>How long do these last? Do you need to worry about mold or any rotting due to the applesauce?</p>
<p>Nope! After the time spent in the oven they should be totally dehydrated. They stay good forever, honestly. But normally they won't smell as strongly the 2nd and 3rd years, so it's good to make another batch if you like them for the smell. :)</p>
<p>You know, when you handed these out and called them "cookies" that was pretty mean. Although I had nice cimaninny breath for a while...</p>
<p>hahaha!</p>
We made these at my daughters play group, it was so much fun we're doing a batch at home for Christmas presents. The teacher at play group said every year when she unwraps the ones her kids made years ago they still smell great.
<p>I just love these :) and they smell soooo good! thanks again :) </p>
Classic craft never goes out of style. Good job!
<p>I always wondered what these were made out of since I have been resisting the urge to eat these my entire life!</p>
<p>Cute! And I can just imagine how good these make your house smell!</p>

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Bio: part of the Instructables Design Studio by day, stitch witch by night. follow me on instagram @makingjiggy to see what i'm working on! ^_^
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