Instructables
Picture of rather strong hook
Img_7809.jpg
I'm still continuing my fascination with what can be done with plastic bottles and lately I have been experimenting with making a wall hook out of the handle of an Odwalla bottle.


 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: Things you need

Picture of things you need
Img_7802.jpg
Img_7688.jpg
A plastic bottle with an included handle, like an Odwalla bottle or vinegar bottle.
Small soda bottle cap
drill for hanging
drill bit for a pilot hole
three longish screws
polymer clay (or something else to fill the inside of it for strength)
  some commenters suggested using concrete instead - which is inexpensive and an interesting alternative
vapour mask and hot knife (or you can use scissors though I find the hot knife easier to control)
microwave
largish glass or plastic container
water
(optional) plastic paint



Step 2: Cut away the handle from the bottle

Picture of cut away the handle from the bottle
Img_7654.jpg
Wearing the vapour mask, use the hot knife to extract the handle from the bottle as indicated.  

Step 3: Condition the clay filler

Picture of condition the clay filler
Img_7690.jpg
Img_7692.jpg
Img_7696.jpg
Img_7708.jpg
Condition the sculpey however you like.  I like to use a pasta machine and a drop of sculpey softener - especially since my clay has been sitting around a good while and is very crumbly and stiff.


Step 4: Roll the clay into a long tube

Picture of roll the clay into a long tube
Roll a good amount of clay into a long tube that will slide easily through the handle.


Step 5: Pack the clay into the handle

Picture of pack the clay into the handle
Slide the tube of clay into the hollow of the handle.



Step 6: Smoosh the cap on

Picture of smoosh the cap on
Img_7729.jpg
Img_7730.jpg
Img_7731.jpg
Img_7732.jpg
Put the cap on and smoosh the clay into it so it is completely filled

Pack it in there.


Step 7: Pack the clay into the triangular base

Picture of pack the clay into the triangular base
Img_7733.jpg
Img_7734.jpg
Img_7783.jpg
Pack the rest of the clay into the triangular base area.

(Try to do this with all one piece of clay.)

Aim for a very flat even surface.  




Step 8: Trim away excess clay and plastic

Picture of trim away excess clay and plastic
Img_7741.jpg
To neaten up the appearance - trim away any excess clay or plastic with an exacto knife




Step 9: Submerge in water

Picture of submerge in water
Place the whole thing into a microwave-safe container so it is completely submerged.


Step 10: Microwave for ten minutes

Picture of microwave for ten minutes
Img_7668.jpg
Microwave on the normal (high) setting for 10 minutes to cure the clay.



Credit where it's due: I searched online and found this website where the author, Garie Sim, documents his successful experiments with microwaving polymer clay.  So Kudos to him for this great technique.


Step 11: Allow to cool

Picture of allow to cool
Don't try to handle it till it's completely cool.

After it is cool.  Check with a fingernail and make sure the clay is not pliable.


Mrballeng11 months ago
Boiling clay!?! What a great tip.
foobear (author)  Mrballeng11 months ago
isn't that great! No fumes! I think that is the best part of this idea
lunakid foobear10 months ago
I like it the best, too. Thanks!
samalert11 months ago
It looks so strong that even few extra pounds of me wouldnt hurt. Great work !
foobear (author)  samalert11 months ago
thank you! I want to test it out and see just how much it can hold - maybe soon I will try heavier things and see how long it holds up
kz111 months ago
Love the idea and the look of the hook. I think I might try to pour a bit of concrete reinforced with wire and see how that turns out. Also read about this plastic you can purchase pretty reasonably that mixes with a cataylist and hardens right up. The guy uses it for submersibles so it has too be awfully good. http://www.dascarplastics.com/

Here's a link to an amazing site on many levels and full of information if you want to pay a visit. http://www.submarineboat.com/index.htm Well worth a vist!
lunakid kz110 months ago
Yes, yes, concrete with a piece of flexible iron -- great upgrade idea! Need to prepare the holes up front (or half-cured?), though, as drilling afterwards could be a depressing experience, I guess.
foobear (author)  kz111 months ago
Thank you. Concrete is a good idea - and cheap too. I would be the wire wouldn't be necessary.
rosewood51311 months ago
I love this the only problem I am having is the cost of the clay. It is quiet expensive here.
But great Instructable thanks I will keep this in mnd.
nwlaurie11 months ago
Very neat!
I've not come across 'Sculp[ey' yet but can't help wondering ... would a bought hook be cheaper? I still like the idea though.
foobear (author)  nwlaurie11 months ago
Well, if you just want to buy a hook, this is the wrong website! =)
nwlaurie foobear11 months ago
So true - Fortunately, like you, I'd rather make one!
In fact when my wife wanted just such a hook out in the gee-gee's yard a few weeks ago I used the 3D printer and about four hours of my life (after one - possibly two - failed attempts) to print one for her!
foobear (author)  nwlaurie11 months ago
Hopefully if I ever get a 3d printer, they'll be faster by that time.
nwlaurie foobear11 months ago
Don't count on it!
foobear (author)  nwlaurie11 months ago
ok whatever
bigb098611 months ago
great!
Kevanf111 months ago
Another fantastic way of reusing old plastic HDPE bottles :) MAy I just suggest something though? How about, instead of using a hot knife to cut the handle out, just mark with something like a 'Sharpie' and cut it out with scissors. No fume hazard that way. It's how I always cut these bottles. I use them for all sorts from scoops to funnels (great for pouring motor oil into the car engine) or just the lower half of the bottle as a basin for when I strip down small things for cleaning. Well done :)
foobear (author)  Kevanf111 months ago
Sure you can do that, I find the hot knife easier to control
Ninzerbean11 months ago
Great! Thanks for sharing.
foobear (author)  Ninzerbean11 months ago
thank you!
marhar11 months ago
Great idea, looks like it works really well! I like the different material suggestions in the comments. That's how you know you've got a good instructable, it's easy for other people to "plus".
macrumpton11 months ago
It is a nice idea, and well executed, but way too much work and cost for a coat hook. You could make an attractive serviceable sustainable hook out of a tree fork with a saw and a knife in about 10 minutes for free. Another approach if you really want to use the plastic might be to make a plaster or concrete mold and fill the mold with melted/softened plastic instead of expensive sculpy.
TP_inc11 months ago
This looks very professional I almost thought it was 3D printed for a second Great Job!
foobear (author)  TP_inc11 months ago
thanks! :)
nyx70211 months ago
Amazing idea. I want to make a batch of these just to have handy. Sculpty can be somewhat expensive. I might explore other materials...
foobear (author)  nyx70211 months ago
cool, if you find something that works, let us know - sculpey is expensive, you're right
jonc111 months ago
brilliant use of the old bottle. do you think filling it with hot glue would work as an alternative?
foobear (author)  jonc111 months ago
I think that might work, yes
TheGreatS11 months ago
Very well done. Bravo.
foobear (author)  TheGreatS11 months ago
yay, thanks!
jadeborade11 months ago
I like DIY! ;-D
foobear (author)  jadeborade11 months ago
me too =)
CaseyCase11 months ago
Very creative. I admire the fact that you were able to look at something as useless as an empty juice bottle and were able to repurpose it into something useful. Bravo!
foobear (author)  CaseyCase11 months ago
thank you!