Analog clocks may be classic but they are a little boring, hack an analog clock to display the time in a different way.
By adding rotating numerical dials to the hour, minute and second hand the time is read by where the dials fall along a vertical point on the clock face, rather than reading the position of each hand against a printed backing.

I chose the time reading position on my clock to be read at 12 o'clock, but you can put the mark anywhere on the plastic face and reset the clock's time for that position. 12 o'clock seemed like the easiest, most natural way to read the time.

The trickiest part of this build was creating a new clock face template, luckily I've provided you with the template I created. Feel free to modify it and use it on your own clock.

Here's a quick video of the reconstructed clock in action:

This confusing clock is a fun take on a boring analog time piece. Best of all, it can be constructed in an afternoon with minimal supplies.

Enough talk, let's disassemble!

Step 1: tools + materials

  • scissors
  • glue
  • printer
  • cardstock
  • paper
  • analog desk clock

<p>I am seeking a solution for mounting a reconstructed clock using old CD. So I can, publish this project.</p>
<p>Try covering the entire CD surface with a layer of card stock, you can write the numbers on the paper and then create a smaller opening in the center that matches the diameter of the clock spindle.</p>
<p>Thanks for your tip. I will use the original pointer pasted on the CDand keeping the imaginary center of the CD. I will use numbers taken from discarded mobile phone. The prototype without numbers is running in test. My concern is with respect to the force that the machine could do. Thanks.</p>
Do you think it would work with a watch?
Great question!<br />I definitely think this would work with a watch and it's where my idea originated, this version was larger and easier to work with for a first prototype.<br /><br />Think you can make it into watch form? If you do I'll give you a 1-year Pro membership!
All right! I will try that as soon as I can!
Finally finished! It looks really good. I had a little trouble, because the discs were rubbing together too much, but it was an easy fix. I'm exited to try more Instructables from mikeasauras and am looking forward to them!
All right. I liked the first watch, but it was kind of plain. I decided to make a new one. I found a cheap watch at Target and made a new face template. The original face was blue, so I kept that idea.
<p>Wow! I was just about to comment that it probably won't work because the motor of a watch it too weak</p><p>Proved me wrong ;)</p>
http://www.instructables.com/id/Jewelers-Glasses/ these could be handy at times!
Wow, that is pretty great you made it into a wrist watch! <br /> <br />I've awarded you a 1-year Pro Membership and a digital patch. Thanks for sharing! (and, I'm sorry I didn't even see this comment until just now)
<p>I am seeking a solution for mounting a clock rebuilt using CD. So I can, publish this project.</p>
for those into clocks and that, http://www.instructables.com/id/Jewelers-Glasses/
&aelig;m&auml;ž&iacute;&ntilde;g!!!! Lol
That's awesome. Like one of those crazy watches from <a href="http://www.tokyoflash.com/en/watches/1/">Tokyoflash</a>. You ARE the envy of your coworkers.<br />
Yup That website has loads of CRAZY!!! watches!
It didn't work
The moment I saw this ible I knew I had to make one. Here it is, with the gears, but without the second pointer, as the clock doen't have one.
awesome, thanks for sharing!<br /><br />You've been patched! Enjoy the 3-month Pro Membership!
Love the simplicity and effect of it!
Love it :)
Great idea!

About This Instructable


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Bio: I'm Mike and I make crazy things at Instructables HQ in San Francisco. Follow me and try a few of my projects for yourself!
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