Instructables
Picture of the TIRR (very simple Timelapse IR Remote)
This new timelapse circuit is much simpler than my first one which had an IC Atmega8, a voltage regulator for the camera, a light sensor to interrupt shooting at night, and of course a potentiometer to set the interval. That was a complicated project (for me) and there was too much chances to make some mistake in design and construction.
I then decided to design this new circuit, this time very simple, which doesn't need any microcontroller, is connected to an IR remote (mine is for Olympus Camedia bridge camera, but you can find similar ones for almost any compact and DSLR camera) and it includes a simple voltage regulator only to supply the IR remote control. Digital camera should need its own PSU (or battery, but it should be a very powerful one for a timelapse). So the TIRR was born!
 
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Step 1: Intro

I preface that I'm not very competent in electronics, I only have a base knowledge, but I've searched a simple timelapse circuit tutorial before planning to design it, and I couldn't be able to find anything similar. Maybe someone better skilled would correct some my mistake or add some useful component to my design.

Step 2: The remote

In my case I already had an old C5060 Olympus bridge camera, so I bought for a few $ an infrared compatible remote control, I opened it and I took out connections for shutter and batteries. The top surface is a thin plastic layer glued to the bottom case of the remote. If you lift it with a knife, with a little of patience you could unglUe it and reach the pcb, where you can weld some wires to the shot and power traces. 

Step 3: Choose the box

Picture of choose the box
Before cutting the copper board and designing the circuit I suggest to choose a nice enclosure.
For my timelapse circuit I've decided that one of these transparent boxes from Muji could be very appropriate. The shop has various sizes of these containers, and I've found a model which is the right size to keep 4 AA batteries inside, plus a little rectangular circuit.
Junophor1 year ago
Hello andrea biffi

This is a very good instructable, really good explained and very good to follow step by step.
The only thing I miss are the headlines of each step. So this would change your famous project to an excellent one!!!
Such a detail might be very important for the result of eg. acontest;-))))

Keep up your great work!!!!!

Cheers
Aeon Junophor
andrea biffi (author)  Junophor1 year ago
Hi Aeon, I'm so pleased to know you like my instructable, yours have always been my steampunk best reference!
If you think it's better to add the titles I'll definitely do that.
Thanks!
Sleep E1 year ago
Great job! I really enjoyed your presentation, thank you.
1-big-dog1 year ago
This is not just a good instructable, it is an EXCELLENT instructible!!!!!!!! Excellent photos, very complete descriptions, and a nice time lapse video to show how well the circuit works. I am very impressed!!!!
andrea biffi (author)  1-big-dog1 year ago
thanks! :-)
chuckyd1 year ago
I couldn't find a definition for "ungle" that fit in the sentence. What is it?
andrea biffi (author)  chuckyd1 year ago
sorry, I forgot the U!
GCLumpkin1 year ago
What make and model camera is that in the first photo of this Instructable?
andrea biffi (author)  GCLumpkin1 year ago
it's a fabulous (in my opinion), but old by now, Olympus C-5060. Still good for timelapse (if you don't want your expensive DLSR overflows his shots capability very fast).
mlwats1 year ago
I made a timelapse controller for my Nikon D80, like this one 3 years ago. keep it simple and reliable and you will never fail to get great shots. Best and most useful camera accessory, i ever made.