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Dryer sheets are something that can be found in nearly every American home - why not find some extra uses for them?

Dryer sheets have many unusual uses, but I'm only posting the ones I've tested and have determined actually work, because we all know how much make-believe stuff is out there in Pinterest-blog-land now. ;)

Keep on reading to find loads of unusual uses for dryer sheets - hopefully a few of them will be new to you!

Step 1: Remove the Dead Bugs From Your Car

I am definitely choosing the wrong time of year to write about this use since we've had about eight inches of snow on the ground for a week now. But hey, it works!

This is a tip I discovered a few years ago and it really does work! Dryer sheets can pretty easily clean bugs off your car's grill, hood, mirrors and windshield. You can use new or used dryer sheets for this, too! There's a load of debate about whether or not it scratches the paint, but I've never seen any damage. :)

To do this, spray the car down with either water or a mild cleaner and then use the dryer sheet to scrub. Viola!

Image via Flickr user Maigh

Step 2: Remove Deodorant Marks From Clothing

This is a great reason to keep used dryer sheets around!

If you ever find yourself with deodorant on your shirt, scrunch up a used dryer sheet and rub the deodorant mark. You'll see the mark disappear pretty dang fast. :D

Just make sure the dryer sheet is used and dry here - or you could create new marks!

Step 3: Fight the Static!

I much prefer using dryer sheets to fight static instead of using Static Guard or other sprays. Here are a few ways to defeat static using dryer sheets:

  • rub a new dryer sheet on clothing that won't behave and is sticking together. It's best to do this on the underside of the clothing to keep it from sticking together.
  • use a new dryer sheet to rub the inside of a knitted hat to help keep your hair from getting charged and flying everywhere once you take it off.
  • when your hair is totally out of control, rub a new dryer sheet on the bristles of your brush and then brush your hair. Good smelling hair and no fly-aways!

Step 4: Freshen While Vacuuming

I have a really ugly and old vacuum (at this point it is legitimately taped together) so enjoy this photo of a very in focus dryer sheet and an out of focus vacuum. ;)

You can add half a fresh dryer sheet to your vacuum bag or canister to make the house smell great while vacuuming! Normally the dryer sheet is not strong enough to scent the air, but you'll find the air smells cleaner. In my case, it totally gets rid of the dog smell the vacuum tends to take on!

This unusual use works really really well - the house will smell extra clean once you're done! It's especially useful if you have pets. I normally end up using both halves of the sheet as I have to empty the canister halfway due to a crazy abundance of dog hair.

(Thought I admit I normally use a cotton ball with some essential oil on it instead so I can customize the scent. :D)

Step 5: Shine Metal Appliances and Clean Glass Shower Doors

Dryer sheets are great to shine your faucets or clean a glass shower door - even the shower walls!

New dryer sheets work best when it comes to soap scum on the shower door and walls. Wet the dryer sheets and use them to scrub! Just make sure to give the surfaces a good rinse after to remove all the gunk you've disrupted. :)

For faucets, used dryer sheets are better! Use them to buff any water marks away.

You can also clean just about any old metal appliance - used dryer sheets are great at buffing away fingerprints and smudges. :D

Step 6: Remove Caked on Food From Pans

If you've cooked something (or you know, burned the hell out of it) that just does not want to come off the pan, a new dryer sheet can help! Fill the pan with hot water and add a dryer sheet. Let it soak for a couple hours or overnight.

When you come back to check on your mess, dump out the water and use the dryer sheet to wipe away the burned on mess! It's pretty amazing honestly. I was only left with a couple tiny spots I had to scrub with the dryer sheet. :)

To test this out I made a big pan of my lemon garlic potatoes - worked like a charm! Normally I soak and scrub and still have gunk stuck on the pan. Not this time!

Step 7: Deodorize ALL THE THINGS

Because new dryer sheets are so fragrant, they're great for keep your clothes and other textiles fresh smelling:

  • tuck a dryer sheet into your luggage before a trip. It'll keep your clothes smelling really nice. I like to keep a plastic grocery bag in there to tie up dirty clothes, too - that'll help to keep the smells to a minimum, too
  • place a dryer sheet into your gym bag - it can help with the sweaty funk that tends to happen in there. If you forget to bring it in and wash the clothes it won't be quite as bad as it normally would!
  • put dryer sheets in the bottoms of your trash cans. I do this in both the kitchen and bathrooms - it's especially great in the bathroom
  • put them under the seats in your car as a substitute for those vent and rearview mirror air fresheners!
  • put dryer sheets in dressers and closets storing out of season clothing or blankets - they'll keep them from getting musty
  • hide dryer sheets under couch or chair cushions in smelly rooms

Step 8: Used Dryer Sheets Are Great for Dusting and Powdery Messes

Used dryer sheets are amazing for dusting and cleaning around the house!

They're a easy and fast way to clean baseboards and molding or general dusting.

One of my favorite ways to use them is to dust electronics - they work great! Next time you have to open up your laptop or PC, use a used dryer sheet to remove all of the dust, hair and debris that collects in there. :D

If you spill flour, cornstarch or other light powdery materials, a used dryer sheet can help grab the mess so you can clean it up quicker. For little messes, use the dryer sheet to wipe them up. For bigger messes, the dryer sheet can help you scoot the mess into a dust pan or trash can. :)

Step 9: Clean Window Blinds

Window blind are one of my least favorite things to clean, but a dryer sheet makes it a bit easier!

This works best with used dryer sheets. I like to close the blinds (so they're facing down and flat) and wipe the surface to remove dust. Then close them so they're up and ridged and wipe again. :D

You can also push the dryer sheet through the blinds and wipe horizontally, but that's a lot more time consuming.

Step 10: Keep Thread Tangle Free

I actually prefer to use beeswax for this, but if you don't have any around, you can use a new or used dryer sheet to keep your thread from tangling.

Thread a needle and then drag it through a dryer sheet to stop the thread from sticking to itself. It works great and your sewing will smell a little nicer for a bit. :D

<p>Dryer sheets are also wonderful for getting crayon marks off of walls! They are miraculous for a family with 3 small children! :-)</p>
Yes, the power of the o-mighty dryer sheet! I never would of thought a simple dryer sheet could do so much useful things! yet be a slight concern for health reasons. my query is do you use a new out of the box one for scorched pans or a used one? all articles or the ones I read never specified which one was used? yes a dryer sheet but was it used or not?
<p>Great post. As a (very hairy shepard/husky mix) dog and cat(s) owner I also use used dryer sheets on my dry dust pad ....it's a hair magnet (great for just before you scrub) and also is great to run over walls for dust. And it no only makes appliances gleam, it's great for faucets and taps!</p>
<p>where do you put the dryer sheets for the vaccuum</p>
<p>If it's bagless, in the canister. If it comes with a bag, stuff a dryer sheet in there. </p>
Kinda gross but it works...use dryer sheets in your underwear when you have bad gas...put them in the back so when you fart, the gas has to travel through the dryer sheet..aww its like a warm hug everytime you fart!
<p>Hahahah! A "warm hug everytime you fart" is 100% hilarious. Useful, too. ;)</p>
<p>Great tips! TYSM.</p>
<p>Nice tips, but please use a biodegradable brand of dryer sheet. Most of them are made of a non-biodegradable polyester.</p>
<p>Has anyone tried using dryer sheets on a kids slide? It's always so FULL of static! Kids shocking each other left and right. I've thought about it, just never tried it. Anyone?</p>
<p>Used dryer sheets are excellent for repairing damaged children's books. It take the glue well and is quite strong. I wouldn't recommend it for books of value, although when you are doing a quick rebinding of a torn spine and then glue the original spine back over your dryer sheet repair, it works quite well. Just thought I would get back on topic and away from the toxic topic comments. :-)</p>
<p>i also used dryer sheets to put off rats from returning to nest under my car bonnet once. they had made a nest behind that felty layer that (i never before noticed) lines the metal of the bonnet lid thing and in the week or so that i wasn't using the car they did over &pound;600 worth of damage to wiring by chewing it. bloody things ! Apparently rats return to past nesting sites by smell so i was advised to stuff these things in there to overpower any aroma they had left behind and it worked coz they didn't come back. So there you are; step 11.</p>
<p>what an awesome instructable! I love that there are us s for used dryer sheets, it makes me feel a bit less guilty about using them. Thank you</p>
<p>Forgive my ignorance, I am English born &amp; now live in Australia, but have never heard of dryer sheets...could someone equate that into English or Oz language for me? Thanks...Peace and Love</p><p>SlimSylv x</p>
<p>Dryer sheets are fabric softener for a clothes dryer. In the US most people own a clothes washer and dryer and use these sheets instead of liquid softener in the washer. I have lived in both the UK and AU/OZ so I can understand why you may not be familiar with them since hanging clothes out to dry instead of using a machine is still the norm. You can find these in the Laundry aisle at most Woolies and Coles. They usually come in a box and dispense similarly to tissues. Hope this helps! :-)</p>
Thanks heaps, Ann...I get it now!!<br>Peace and Love <br>Sylvia x
<p>Now I'm curious as to what they're called in Oz?</p>
<p>Liquid fabric softener brand 'Fluffy' also make fluffy tumble dryer sheets they come in a blue box of 40 sheets, not all supermarkets sell them I think I bought them last at Coles (usually on the top shelf). I don't know how expensive they are in US but here in Melbourne they are around $6 - $7</p>
AAAAhhh, now I see...Thanks heaps, Donna....<br>Peace and Love<br>Sylvia x
<p>Stop bees, hornets, wasps from coming into the house by tucking used dryer sheets around the door to the back porch. The mudd dobbers would build nests everywhere, in shoes on hats coats. I stoped it 100% by doing this.</p>
Yes, forgive my Ausralian ignorance too...what are &quot;Dryer Sheets&quot;?<br>Ditto the sentiments expressed below by SlimSylv
<p>Dryer sheets are also great for keeping mice out of everything. They hate the smell. I've used them on boats , in my airplane (learned this from another pilot), in the house attic, garden shed, travel trailer. Much better than dealing with mouse traps or worse poisons that leave mice dead inside a wall or other mouse hidey holes. </p>
<p>embarrassing to admit, but that doesn't work @ all. you're fortunate that they don't show up, but it's not because of the dryer sheets. in cold weather, my area of town has mice scrambling for warmth. an entire box of dryer sheets spread throughout a tiny kitchen did absolutely nothing! i think they pinched their tiny noses &amp; laughed @ us.</p>
It is of course impossible to prove without a double blind test. However, anecdotally, when I didn't use the sheets, I had mice, when I did they were absent. It may be the brand (or alien mouse eaters), I used only bounce.
<p>Mice trying to tell us something?</p>
<p>AND&mdash;we use dryer sheets at our outdoor BBQ in the summer. Stick one in your belt or wherever and they are an excellent mosquito repellant. </p>
Is this legit??? I MUST try this. I can't stand spraying something all over me. If this works, you are officially my new best friend!<br><br>III
<p>Another use which I'm told works is to fold a clean dryer sheet and put it around the dogs collar. The dog smells nice and the fleas don't like it!</p>
<p>If you put a dryer sheet in your mailbox, it will keep bees and hornets from making a nest in your mailbox. Your mail carrier will appreciate it!</p>
Another point. Dryer sheets are basically just micro-fiber cloths impregnated with wax! This is not great for your cloths. But it's really bad for your dryer! The wax tends to accumulate and burn to the interior. This causes damage to the sensors and the paint and plastic parts by making them brittle. If there is broken plastic inside your dryer, or it eats clothes every so often. This is why! The same process damages the areas of your clothes where they are creased or folded....
<p>For those of us who suffer from allergies, the best use for drier sheets is to use them in the unopened box to stuff our garbage cans. Better yet, leave them to occupy shelf space in the store.</p>
<p>One can also use the sheets to blow their nose.</p>
Then you would be inhaling the fumes in their most concentrated form. That would close your nasal passages completely.
<p>Seriously - you took the time to write this?</p>
<p>Yes, I am serious about this. If you had ever had your airway totally blocked by an allergic reaction, you would be serious about it, too. Dryer sheets use the cheapest and most powerful artificial fragrances. They are capable of causing the most severe and even life-threatening reactions, especially from asthma sufferers. To use them indiscriminately about the house or permeate your clothing with these fumes then go into a public place is my idea of something really ignorant. I use only fragrance-free liquid softeners, and I have never had any problem with static in my clothes. Dryer sheets are useless at best and highly allergenic at worst. If you feel a neurotic need to put something in your dryer, use dryer balls. At least they won't put harmful chemicals into your clothes.</p>
<p>Excellent points, EmmitS, and well made! </p>
<p>A great use is put a sheet under the front seats of your car. Will take away any musty oders.</p>
<p>Doubting Thomases. Dihydrogen monoxide DOES kill you! Every time you inhale a lung full, you are closer to death!</p>
<p>Correct but every time you inhale a lung full of clean air you are closer to death!!!</p>
<p>Yes it can kill you if you breath a mouth full but just swallow! </p>
<p>For many years I have used a dryer sheet to help with the static in my hair. I figured that if it would stop the static in a dryer, surely it would or could do the same with my hair. It was an idea I came up with on my own. Not sure how to go about it, I would actually rub my hair down with a dryer sheet before combing. In time I advanced to rubbing the comb and then comb my hair. But now I just lay the comb on the sheet and it seems to do pretty good that way.</p>
<p>After soaking &quot;for a few hours or overnight&quot; you could probably use almost anything to clean the pan. If you think carefully about what a dryer sheet is, you're essentially using a coarse fiber cloth to scrub soggy food off the pan. The fabric softener's chemicals aren't helping you clean the pan! Also, fabric softeners are not exactly food safe. </p><p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabric_softener" rel="nofollow">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabric_softener</a></p><p><br></p>
<p>the only one I had used before was dresser drawers.great uses,I have always lived with reuse,reuse.</p>
<p>Cheap $5.00 red wine heated in a pot, poured into the pan with the crust then add some dish detergent and let stand for a few hours. That does the trick for us.</p>
<p>Vacuum cleaners would not smell as musty if they were cleaned on a regular basis.I know that the vacuum cleans the house but who cleans the vacuum.</p>
<p>They do scratch chrome. They are slightly abrasive. Be careful on glass.</p>
<p>Best use I know is feeding a fire just to get rid of their stink.</p>
<p>good idea, adaptive, because isn't that what theses sheets are for anyhow? After reading some of the comments, I've come to the conclusion that most of the commentators believe everyone else to be stupid. You really could cause an argument in an empty room. This person has taken the time to say what EXTRA uses she has found for these sheets. Leave it at that instead of trying to be smartarses and going on with the rubbish you are spouting. At least she has tried to do something positive with these already highly un-necessary sheets.</p>
<p>These are all great tips, and for those who don't use dryer sheets (I started using FOIL BALLS, once I learned about this lifehack: <a href="http://goo.gl/IsdAjK." rel="nofollow">http://goo.gl/IsdAjK. </a> And here's one for foil-wrapped tennis balls: http://goo.gl/Eg8Y1d), but do have MICROFIBER CLOTHS, they seem like they'd be a perfect substitute for most of these tips.</p>
<p>you should consider doing a Mad Max mod on your vaccum cleaner. :-)</p><p>I don't even have a dryer, but I'm going to pick up a nix if dryer sheets to try some of these suggestions.</p>

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