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  • 9988ScooterGirl. commented on HollyMann's instructable Homemade Scented Wax Melts1 week ago
    Homemade Scented Wax Melts

    Essential oils aren't very good for candle making. Some have good cold throw but no hot throw while others lack both. Stick with fragrance oils. You can find tons to choose from on any site that sells candle supplies although even then you must be careful. The oils must be formulated for the type of wax AND must be added when the wax is at the proper temperature. Otherwise the throw may be weak or even missing completely.

    Fragrance oils. They're used for candle making and huge selections are available on any candle making site.

    Many essential oils simply will not mix with wax; they just sink to the bottom in little oily balls. Essential oils also have a good cold throw, meaning they smell fine while the wax is cold, but once heated lose their potency or even take on a fuel like aroma. Your best bet is to use fragrance oils formulated for candle making which mix completely with the wax and have both good cold and hot throw. Soy wax is also a cheaper alternative to beeswax.

    I'm sorry but this is a terrible instructable as obtaining a decent scented wax is not just a matter of melting some wax and throwing in stuff that smells good. Your method is also dangerous.Like any wax, bees wax has a flashpoint and therefore should ONLY be melted in a double boiler and the progress monitored with a candy thermometer. Anything else and there's a substantial risk of fire.As for the scenting, essential oils, not to mention spices, are terrible choices. They don't diffuse in the wax and, worse, have no hot throw and scented wax that is to be burned or melted is all about hot throw, that is the scent given off when the wax is heated. To obtain it you not only want to use fragrance oils formulated for candle making but you must add the fragrance when the wax is at the ...

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    I'm sorry but this is a terrible instructable as obtaining a decent scented wax is not just a matter of melting some wax and throwing in stuff that smells good. Your method is also dangerous.Like any wax, bees wax has a flashpoint and therefore should ONLY be melted in a double boiler and the progress monitored with a candy thermometer. Anything else and there's a substantial risk of fire.As for the scenting, essential oils, not to mention spices, are terrible choices. They don't diffuse in the wax and, worse, have no hot throw and scented wax that is to be burned or melted is all about hot throw, that is the scent given off when the wax is heated. To obtain it you not only want to use fragrance oils formulated for candle making but you must add the fragrance when the wax is at the proper temp, usually about 185F (another reason for the double boiler and thermometer), and then the wax continually agitated until the temperature drops 10 degrees. If it's just tossed in you WILL lose hot throw.Candle making isn't just a craft. It's also a science and I hate to see people wasting good money on expensive bees wax, essential oils and spices just to end up with a product that is mediocre at best.

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  • 9988ScooterGirl. commented on randofo's instructable DIY Candles1 year ago
    DIY Candles

    It's important to note that wicks come in different diameters and sizes. LX type wicks are good for soy whereas HTC, which burn hotter, are better for paraffin. The diameter also has to be appropriate for the diameter of the container. Too small and the wick will simply burn a hole and drown, too big and the flame is too tall and causes smoking. Adding color or scent also changes the wick burning qualities, with heavier scents and darker colors requiring a larger wick. It's best to get a sample pack of various wick types and sizes to find which works best for your favorite style of container. Beginners, BTW, should stick with containers that have straight vertical lines. Rounded containers are harder to properly wick due to the changes in diameter at different points.

    It's important to note that wicks come in different diameters and sizes. LX type wicks are good for soy whereas HTP, which burn hotter, are better for paraffin. The diameter also has to be appropriate for the diameter of the container. Too small and the wick will simply burn a hole and drown, too big and the flame is too tall and causes smoking. Adding color or scent also changes the wick burning qualities, with heavier scents and darker colors requiring a larger wick.It's best to get a sample pack of various wick types and sizes to find which works best for your favorite style of container. Beginners, BTW, should stick with containers that have straight vertical lines. Rounded containers are harder to properly wick due to the changes in diameter at different points.

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