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  • AdeV commented on Bruce McCarthy's instructable Capacitive Switch for Arduino2 weeks ago
    Capacitive Switch for Arduino

    Just a quick followup - I adpated your code & applied my own "doorbell" code; works a charm, and compiles into 1/3rd of the space needed by the library version! And (so far) it's more reliable too!Once I've actually finished making the thing, I'll make an instructable of my own I think.PS: You don't need the discharge pin: Just set the input pin low, and it discharges PDQ (I put a 5msec delay in to be sure, probably don't need it).

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  • AdeV commented on Bruce McCarthy's instructable Capacitive Switch for Arduino2 weeks ago
    Capacitive Switch for Arduino

    Just came across this instructible via Google - nicely done! Very clear... I've built a circuit using the concepts in the Arduino Playground (https://playground.arduino.cc/Main/CapacitiveSenso... but your code makes it dead obvious what's going on, so thank you for that! I think it might also compile smaller, which will be ideal for transferring to an ATTiny85 - my project is a touch-sensitive doorbell switch, as I'm fed up of the cheap mechanical switches failing.Regarding soldering to aluminium: Not possible! The solder just won't stick to it - even if you try REALLY hard. However, presumably with your door handle idea, can't you just use the handle itself (assuming it's metal) as the sensor?I'm also curious as to why you're using a separate discharge pin. IIRC the CapSense playground...

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    Just came across this instructible via Google - nicely done! Very clear... I've built a circuit using the concepts in the Arduino Playground (https://playground.arduino.cc/Main/CapacitiveSenso... but your code makes it dead obvious what's going on, so thank you for that! I think it might also compile smaller, which will be ideal for transferring to an ATTiny85 - my project is a touch-sensitive doorbell switch, as I'm fed up of the cheap mechanical switches failing.Regarding soldering to aluminium: Not possible! The solder just won't stick to it - even if you try REALLY hard. However, presumably with your door handle idea, can't you just use the handle itself (assuming it's metal) as the sensor?I'm also curious as to why you're using a separate discharge pin. IIRC the CapSense playground (and others I've seen) simply drive both pins low & let the current dissipate through the Arduino.

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  • AdeV commented on innovativetom's instructable Arduino Soil Moisture Sensor1 year ago
    Arduino Soil Moisture Sensor

    You could save a bunch of code by using a switch() statement with "fall-through" to set your LEDs... I haven't tested this code, so it might need debugging, but here's what I'd do:// Reset all LEDsdigitalWrite(led1, LOW);digitalWrite(led2, LOW);digitalWrite(led3, LOW);digitalWrite(led4, LOW);digitalWrite(led5, LOW);switch(sensorValue) { case >= 820: digitalWrite(led5, HIGH); // normally we'd put "break;" here to exit the select case >= 615: digitalWrite(led4, HIGH); case >= 410: digitalWrite(led3, HIGH); case >= 250: digitalWrite(led2, HIGH); case >= 0: digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);}By excluding the break; after each case statement, the code "falls through" and runs all the other cases as well. But it only runs from the fir...

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    You could save a bunch of code by using a switch() statement with "fall-through" to set your LEDs... I haven't tested this code, so it might need debugging, but here's what I'd do:// Reset all LEDsdigitalWrite(led1, LOW);digitalWrite(led2, LOW);digitalWrite(led3, LOW);digitalWrite(led4, LOW);digitalWrite(led5, LOW);switch(sensorValue) { case >= 820: digitalWrite(led5, HIGH); // normally we'd put "break;" here to exit the select case >= 615: digitalWrite(led4, HIGH); case >= 410: digitalWrite(led3, HIGH); case >= 250: digitalWrite(led2, HIGH); case >= 0: digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);}By excluding the break; after each case statement, the code "falls through" and runs all the other cases as well. But it only runs from the first case that matches, so if the sensor value was 255 for example, the first matching case is "case >= 250", so LED2 comes on. The code falls through from there & also turns led1 on. Since all LEDs were turned off at the start, leds3, 4 and 5 remain off.HTH!

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