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  • How to Build a Block Retaining Wall

    I should start by saying that I wasn't denigrating anything you've done, I was trying to catch people from assuming too much from (any) instructable. It would be horrible if someone's house was damaged. I suppose the moral would be "take local professional advice", but I'm all for DIY and skills not being in the domain of the few. If I didn't make it clear before, you've done a good job! Pointing is the application of a water tight (often cosmetic) grout (cement) between the joints on the face, and finishing it in some way (lots of styles, especial on stonework). e.g. it may be recessed, flush, exposed, flat, angled, curved (convex or concave), polished or brushed etc. Often a style will be associated with a locality. Locally we have raised 'snail' pointing on locally quarrie...

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    I should start by saying that I wasn't denigrating anything you've done, I was trying to catch people from assuming too much from (any) instructable. It would be horrible if someone's house was damaged. I suppose the moral would be "take local professional advice", but I'm all for DIY and skills not being in the domain of the few. If I didn't make it clear before, you've done a good job! Pointing is the application of a water tight (often cosmetic) grout (cement) between the joints on the face, and finishing it in some way (lots of styles, especial on stonework). e.g. it may be recessed, flush, exposed, flat, angled, curved (convex or concave), polished or brushed etc. Often a style will be associated with a locality. Locally we have raised 'snail' pointing on locally quarried stone something like this, but less angular pointing It's not clear from the images if your wall is pointed. Pointing will hold back any water behind the wall. Your wall is on a gravel bed and so should cope with drainage, depending on the properties of the barrier. Pointing tends to be hard (brittle) and so will not cope with movement. The line is usually pulled taught at the height of the course being laid and a few mm from the face. Your work should never touch the line. If you were doing anything more complicated, then you would use a "story stick" too. Makes life so easy! Layout This guy demonstrates some of the techniques quite well and shows the use of a story stick. I had to learn all the trades, from groundwork to setting finials on a roof and everything between! Even now I'd say that I could give any of them a fair bash. My brickwork isn't really for fair face work and very slow ;) My plastering is acceptable, carpentry & plumbing is good. I hate painting, I can't tell you how many Georgian and sash windows I've painted. I always used to try to do electrical work, as it's one of the cleanest, driest, warmest trades :D None of the trades are difficult if you break them down, but much easier with hints from a skilled practitioner, and of course you need to be aware of planning and building regs, the law etc.

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  • How to Build a Block Retaining Wall

    Very fine instructable and you've done a nice looking job with the blocks, especially over such a length.I would like to say, especially if people are tempted to go bigger scale, this isn't really a retaining wall. A retaining wall will normally have a high newton block/reinforced concrete wall, often with piers, sitting on a reinforced foundation, even a low one, with (if required) a fair-face wall sitting in front. The wall will also have weep holes to prevent the build up of water behind the wall. This would be suitable in a 'home context', when you start to get a bit more serious, then different techniques are usually employed.They are interesting blocks that you've used, easy to create curves without cuts. It looks like you've pointed the wall. I'd be inclined to take a drill and a...

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    Very fine instructable and you've done a nice looking job with the blocks, especially over such a length.I would like to say, especially if people are tempted to go bigger scale, this isn't really a retaining wall. A retaining wall will normally have a high newton block/reinforced concrete wall, often with piers, sitting on a reinforced foundation, even a low one, with (if required) a fair-face wall sitting in front. The wall will also have weep holes to prevent the build up of water behind the wall. This would be suitable in a 'home context', when you start to get a bit more serious, then different techniques are usually employed.They are interesting blocks that you've used, easy to create curves without cuts. It looks like you've pointed the wall. I'd be inclined to take a drill and add some weep holes, especially lower down.Generally speaking, the above may be fine for a rustic terrace in a garden, but if it's intended to prevent erosion of soil from the footing of the building, then I'd suggest a more robust structure, especially if the ground-slope had been changed. You may not notice the erosion since it's normally a slow process. Your first indication will be cracks within the building. If you are simply creating a terrace by adding soil to the original horizon, then you may well be okay, especially if this is not a new-build and the ground is stabilized. Remember that soil can easily contract and swell 10% between wet and bone dry!Don't underestimate the forces involved. Nature wants everything flat!I can't tell from your photo, but for others looking at your instructable, the line shouldn't touch the wall, but stand off by a few mm, you can set that with a thin lath if wood etc, or you can buy tingles that automatically hold the line off. An experienced bricklayer will usually wind his line around a couple of bricks and set the distance by positioning the brick. If you build any wall longer than your level/straight-edge, you should use a line. In addition to a boat level, and a bricklayers level, a line-level is very useful, and make a habit of rotating your level 180 deg each time. This indicates a build up of dirt under the level.

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on SpaceShipOne's instructable Underwater ROV2 weeks ago
    Underwater ROV

    Further to comments on IR underwater:Yes the absorption of light increases rapidly toward the longer wave-lengths. However, many aquatic animals use IR, e.g. goldfish. This must have an evolutionary advantage, nature tends not to waste energy in non-working systems. It is probably only useful at very short range, but the difference between being 'blind' or having some sight is massive and resolution is probably not too important at a few inches. It's about horses for courses. Suck it and see!Fun build by the way, hope it stays water-tight. ;)

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  • How to Make a CrossCut Sled for Table Saw

    Nice and clear, simple and efficientMay I suggest a simple modification for safety? Add a block at the rear of the sled so that the exiting blade is covered.The five cut method you mention can make a huge difference. well worth the effort. Anyone making a sled should check this out.

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on ThomasVDD's instructable Hard Drive Speaker1 month ago
    Hard Drive Speaker

    +1Rosin core solder works well for novices. Well worth spending on.So many people don't have a clue how to solder. A good quality, high wattage temp controlled iron is a good investment.Fun project :)

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 10 Woodworking Tricks the Pros Use2 months ago
    10 Woodworking Tricks the Pros Use

    Yes, I'd go with travelfeet, Kerf is both the width/gap left by the cut and a method of bending timber by using a series of cuts. Used widely in guitar making.The set has two effects, it both aids the cutting of the fibres and produces a kerf that is wider than the blade, thus allowing the blade to pass without binding.I like the salt idea, but I think that the hot glue is probably only suitable for rough work ;)

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on 陳亮's instructable Circuit Visualization2 months ago
    Circuit Visualization

    Very nice, but I have to ask, isn't the point of micro electronics to be inconspicuous? ;) Please read on...The breadboard and any sketches should be fine for "reading the connections", in fact a clear circuit diagram will be your best option, Why do you need to do this on the end product? Having designed and made it, you ought to know how it went together.The drawing is an abstraction, students should learn to work with abstractions rather than dumbing everything down.Do you need to have a rationale for what is essentially a piece of functional art? What not just say, I made this, it looks freeking great! ;)

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on Attmos's instructable Say Goodbye to That Formica CounterTop!3 months ago
    Say Goodbye to That Formica CounterTop!

    Did you know that you can get many dents out of wood with a hot clothes iron and a wet cloth! You need to remove the finish since you need to get steam into the fibres. They will plump up and remove the dent. Then sand and reapply your finish. ;)

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on Attmos's instructable Say Goodbye to That Formica CounterTop!3 months ago
    Say Goodbye to That Formica CounterTop!

    Very nice deep gloss finish. :)Good hints and tips.May I mention that a butchers block is made of end-grain. ("Butcher Block Counter Top" title given in the link)

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  • Chain Tension Adjustment on Vintage Honda Motorcycles

    The problem with adding oil to a dirty chain, is that along with existing and newly picked up sand and dirt (English meaning of the word), you are making lapping paste! Grinding away your expensive chain and sprockets.So the first thing to do is remove the dirt (In fact the first thing is to visit the manufacturers website for a full list of do's & dont's to maintain their chain!). It usually means removing the chain to do a good job (I usually had two on the go, one on the bike, one being cleaned). You need to remove the dirt from the sprockets too.Don't use solvents unless advised, some of the better chains have O-ring (sealed chains) to keep the dirt out of the gap between the roller and the bushing that may perish. Mechanical cleaning with a soft brush works (tooth brush etc.) ...

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    The problem with adding oil to a dirty chain, is that along with existing and newly picked up sand and dirt (English meaning of the word), you are making lapping paste! Grinding away your expensive chain and sprockets.So the first thing to do is remove the dirt (In fact the first thing is to visit the manufacturers website for a full list of do's & dont's to maintain their chain!). It usually means removing the chain to do a good job (I usually had two on the go, one on the bike, one being cleaned). You need to remove the dirt from the sprockets too.Don't use solvents unless advised, some of the better chains have O-ring (sealed chains) to keep the dirt out of the gap between the roller and the bushing that may perish. Mechanical cleaning with a soft brush works (tooth brush etc.) When the dirt is gone you need to lubricate the parts in contact with each other using the correct lubricant. (I used to use a hot wax based product, but that is probably old-hat now). Certainly not WD40! That will drive out any thicker lubricants and dirt sticks to it too easily (only good for penetrating, despite what it says on the can!)Then the important bit, you need to get rid of the excess oil that acts as a sticky sand collector.A sealed chain does not need lubricating, but should be kept clean!LOL, just had a gander and found this in seconds, so ignore my blurb above.... http://www.sprocketsunlimited.com/Chainmaintenance.html

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  • Chain Tension Adjustment on Vintage Honda Motorcycles

    Chain quality/size, contaminants (grit), engine power, sprocket size, sprocket wear, sprocket alignment, axis of rear suspension/travel, how big a handful of revs you grab at the lights etc. will all effect chain wear.Simply spraying "lube" on the chain as shown above is a bad idea!

    Honda CB's ;) Takes me back!Nice clear instructionJust a note for the UK viewers. The pin is a split pin holding the castellated nut from rotating. In the UK a cotter pin is a pin (bolt) with a tapered flat, as used on older bicycle cranks etc.You should replace your split pin since they work harden very easily. They only cost pennies and could save your life.

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  • Arduino + Push Switch + Debouncing + Interrupts

    Very nicely presented.What is U1? You don't give an ID (that I can see), a Schmitt might be even better (say CD4093B) . You could of course create a monostable with a better output characteristic using two gates of a CD4000B/7400 rather than one gate.Did your first circuit work? with a N/O switch, and 10K, it's going to keep the pin pretty high! I would have put the resistor in the 5V line. One might use this technique with cmos or TTL logic but...The thing about using microcontrollers is that you can remove a lot of hardware with code!So, if you connect the switch directly to the pin (2) and the other side to ground using a weak pull up, you only need a switch!This gives the pull up....pinMode(interruptPin, INPUT_PULLUP);Then turn off the interrupt once triggered.e.g.button press (nega...

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    Very nicely presented.What is U1? You don't give an ID (that I can see), a Schmitt might be even better (say CD4093B) . You could of course create a monostable with a better output characteristic using two gates of a CD4000B/7400 rather than one gate.Did your first circuit work? with a N/O switch, and 10K, it's going to keep the pin pretty high! I would have put the resistor in the 5V line. One might use this technique with cmos or TTL logic but...The thing about using microcontrollers is that you can remove a lot of hardware with code!So, if you connect the switch directly to the pin (2) and the other side to ground using a weak pull up, you only need a switch!This gives the pull up....pinMode(interruptPin, INPUT_PULLUP);Then turn off the interrupt once triggered.e.g.button press (negative transition)having used attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(interruptPin), checkSwitch, LOW); to set up the interruptcheckSwitch being your interrupt service routineenter the interrupt routineturn off the interrupt with detachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(interruptPin));set buttonPressedFlag (volatile of course)exit the interruptIn the main loop restart the interrupt if buttonPressedFlag with attachInterrupt(digitalPinToInterrupt(interruptPin), checkSwitch, LOW); againand remember to clear buttonPressedFlag (you may want to check for button up first).May I suggest that you keep your ISRs as short as possible, and process everything elsewhere. You can of course explicitly change the direction of the interrupt detection to identify when the switch is released.This technique works beautifully with rotary encoders. You will see many people using all manner of conditioning circuits, but you only require two ISRs to give jitter-free output.I hope that's useful

    It's not quite that simple. The problem is the "bounce" when you close a switch, the contacts actually bounce, making and breaking the contact many times in a few mS, which is an age for an MPU! we are effectively slowing down time and so "see" the bounce!Mercury whetted contacts, sliding contacts etc. can help (this is a big can of worms!).But as I posted elsewhere (unless MPU time is at a real premium), then software debouncing is a simple and effective measure.In its simplest form you can do the following.(assume a momentary press button, but there are different types of switches and the software may be looking for different press lengths etc.)if contact{pause x mS (this is the equiv of an RC network)it's stopped bouncing by now!check it's still down (could have b...

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    It's not quite that simple. The problem is the "bounce" when you close a switch, the contacts actually bounce, making and breaking the contact many times in a few mS, which is an age for an MPU! we are effectively slowing down time and so "see" the bounce!Mercury whetted contacts, sliding contacts etc. can help (this is a big can of worms!).But as I posted elsewhere (unless MPU time is at a real premium), then software debouncing is a simple and effective measure.In its simplest form you can do the following.(assume a momentary press button, but there are different types of switches and the software may be looking for different press lengths etc.)if contact{pause x mS (this is the equiv of an RC network)it's stopped bouncing by now!check it's still down (could have been an accidental contact - too short for our needs) so exit.Loop until the switch is open again, if time-out then exit(user is sensible and released the button! yippeeeeee)Indicate a valid button press and exit!}But we can be much more subtle when we start to us interrupts and control those interrupts!There are many permutations and techniques for what on the face of it is a simple button press!

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on LabRatMatt's instructable Hybrid Rocket Engine5 months ago
    Hybrid Rocket Engine

    Igniting it might be an issue too.Phone taps can be fun, especially when the 'tapper' doesn't know that the 'tappee' knows.

    Nobody has to make your prototype hybrid rocket engine (which it clearly is). We live in an age (as mentioned above) where nobody wants to take responsibility for their own actions, yet happy to stand around waving their 'holier than thou' flags with no personal cost; yet it gives them (they assume) the moral high-ground. They are usually the ones that never achieve anything. Anyone can point after the event.I say top marks for your design and planning. You could easily have spent twice as long writing a RA, and yet nobody was hurt despite that! Joining a rocketry club is probably a good idea (although I could just as easily give many reasons for that not being a good idea - you'll be near other people with rockets for one!)I'm keen on extreme sports, and as a kid blew stuff up with my ...

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    Nobody has to make your prototype hybrid rocket engine (which it clearly is). We live in an age (as mentioned above) where nobody wants to take responsibility for their own actions, yet happy to stand around waving their 'holier than thou' flags with no personal cost; yet it gives them (they assume) the moral high-ground. They are usually the ones that never achieve anything. Anyone can point after the event.I say top marks for your design and planning. You could easily have spent twice as long writing a RA, and yet nobody was hurt despite that! Joining a rocketry club is probably a good idea (although I could just as easily give many reasons for that not being a good idea - you'll be near other people with rockets for one!)I'm keen on extreme sports, and as a kid blew stuff up with my own explosives (chemistry is fun!), even made my own bullets using casings from a fun fair. Launched Greek fire balls from a home-made Roman catapult, blasted around on motorbikes (of course), taught myself to repel off of railway bridges, on and on! Why am I here in one piece all this time later? I think about and understand the dangers, and don't trust my life to other people.I have to post a letter in a moment, I don't have a RA, but either way, I could die getting to the post box - such is life.Live life, be safe and don't be put off.

    Nyxius is correct, the point of a risk assessment is to understand the risks, and when it goes wrong, you hold it up to the coroner and say, look, we followed these procedures, I'm innocent!When sitting on H&S committees and writing risk assessments, you should hold one word at the forefront, "Reasonable". Are you taking reasonable precautions? And one thought, "who will the coroner point at in the event of an accident?"You can write all the guidelines you like, accidents will still happen, have a chat with NASA.If you are playing with kit in a field on your own, the guidelines will be different from working with others in a formal club. Why? because people want to pass the blame.Today, it's ALWAYS the fault of someone else. Stick you hand into the blades of a mi...

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    Nyxius is correct, the point of a risk assessment is to understand the risks, and when it goes wrong, you hold it up to the coroner and say, look, we followed these procedures, I'm innocent!When sitting on H&S committees and writing risk assessments, you should hold one word at the forefront, "Reasonable". Are you taking reasonable precautions? And one thought, "who will the coroner point at in the event of an accident?"You can write all the guidelines you like, accidents will still happen, have a chat with NASA.If you are playing with kit in a field on your own, the guidelines will be different from working with others in a formal club. Why? because people want to pass the blame.Today, it's ALWAYS the fault of someone else. Stick you hand into the blades of a mincer, it'll be the fault of the manufacturer!To LAB RAT MATT. Well done!

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on F4916's instructable How to Desalinate Seawater5 months ago
    How to Desalinate Seawater

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zinc_toxicity

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw9 months ago
    5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw

    All very good methods. Great instructable.You can also tap with a centre punch (works on nuts, bolts and machine screws too). Tap at a tangent, forcing the screw to turn. (you can make a starter hole with a 1mm drill bit)Punching down can help too (not too hard), giving a little space for the thread in the timber, although corrosion is often the problemTapping the screwdriver or driver bit can improve the fit, especially on cheap soft screws.If enough head is available, then pliers, mole-grips, water-pumps etc. can often get you out of trouble.Some PVC tape around the screw will help protect the surface before you attack.I once used epoxy to connect a good screw head-to-head with the stuck one and used pliers. I got just enough torque before the glue failed.Don't use worn drivers! This ...

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    All very good methods. Great instructable.You can also tap with a centre punch (works on nuts, bolts and machine screws too). Tap at a tangent, forcing the screw to turn. (you can make a starter hole with a 1mm drill bit)Punching down can help too (not too hard), giving a little space for the thread in the timber, although corrosion is often the problemTapping the screwdriver or driver bit can improve the fit, especially on cheap soft screws.If enough head is available, then pliers, mole-grips, water-pumps etc. can often get you out of trouble.Some PVC tape around the screw will help protect the surface before you attack.I once used epoxy to connect a good screw head-to-head with the stuck one and used pliers. I got just enough torque before the glue failed.Don't use worn drivers! This is especially true on brass slotted screws. The driver should be a tight fit and held square (try a longer handle).Electric screwdrivers can mess up a screw before you can blink! Every tool requires a level of skill.

    No need to be that careful. Use a drill bit a little larger diameter than the shank And at least smaller than the diameter of the head. The head will come out quite easily (it will start spinning with the drill bit). Once the pieces are apart, grab the shank and unscrew.

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on donedirtcheap's instructable Tincloth9 months ago
    Tincloth

    Toilet rings? Had to google that. Neoprene/rubber doughnuts used here. Although I seem to remember soft rope impregnated with grease or wax for similar use.I would imagine that the wax would not be pure beeswax as it would probably be too hard at room temperature to form a seal, so possibly has softeners in it which would modify the chemistry. That may explain why some people are having issues. I've used pure beeswax to waterproof bush hats, using beeswax blocks, rubbed into the fabric and hot air. If you don't get a good soak then it cracks easily and allows wicking to occur.It will be interesting to try it with a solvent as you have done. Off to Scotland in a few weeks, so a good test :) Wonder if the linseed will repel midges? :)

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on shopbuilt's instructable Scary sharp on a budget10 months ago
    Scary sharp on a budget

    Glass paper/carborundum paper (wet & dry), some of which is of course cloth backed, makes a good cheap alternative (the cost of abrasives that could go toward some good tools). I find that cheap diamond 'stones' work really fast and are very cheap and more substantial than glued glass paper/carborundum paper.Personally I use 800 grit max, normally 400 is fine (pun intended). Use water or 'hard surface cleaner' spray as a lubricant/de-clogger.The real difference is the polishing! I use a flat board about 250mm x 75mm with a strip of wood 20x30mm glued/screwed to the back so it can be fixed in a vice. To the working face I glue a sheet of leather, suede side up, this is dressed with jewellers rouge and used to polish, using drawing strokes - 30 to 60 will give a very high polish.Just ...

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    Glass paper/carborundum paper (wet & dry), some of which is of course cloth backed, makes a good cheap alternative (the cost of abrasives that could go toward some good tools). I find that cheap diamond 'stones' work really fast and are very cheap and more substantial than glued glass paper/carborundum paper.Personally I use 800 grit max, normally 400 is fine (pun intended). Use water or 'hard surface cleaner' spray as a lubricant/de-clogger.The real difference is the polishing! I use a flat board about 250mm x 75mm with a strip of wood 20x30mm glued/screwed to the back so it can be fixed in a vice. To the working face I glue a sheet of leather, suede side up, this is dressed with jewellers rouge and used to polish, using drawing strokes - 30 to 60 will give a very high polish.Just yesterday I used a piece of 2x4 as a backing and rapped my father's leather apron around it (no rouge) to polish a 'sticking' but otherwise sharp chisel!Honing guides usually come with an angle setting instruction. You set the angle by how much blade protrudes from the end (but the angle indicator shown is cool and very cheap out of China - I use mine on my bench saw), But try to not use honing guides, it only takes a little practice to get the angle right, you get a better 'feel' for your tools and in fact you may find a variance in angle better suits your woodworking technique.Assuming the angle is correct, as you lift the blade on the 'stone', rocking upward, a meniscus of lubricant will show at the tip of the blade as you equal the angle - this is very easy to see on oil stones and makes angle setting simple.Nice instrucatable, and shows that you don't need the most expensive kit!

    Google? Depends where you are in the world. If in the UK, these people are worth a visit, their Warminster shop is like a warren of things you can't do without! ;)What's your budget?http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-deluxe-honing...

    As codswallop says, it depends upon the plane use. Roughing planes often have a curved finish to the iron. taking off the outside edges of a flat blade makes for easy use.

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  • How to Make a 12v Battery Charger

    I have several of these little PSU's, they are general purpose step down PSUs (some provide step up/down). At the current supplied, charge curves will make little difference. SLA used to be used in older motorcycles with the crudest of chargers.I use the bigger PSU of this type to supply a steady current to my Li-Po charger ;)The voltage should be set to 13.8 V (not 14V) for lead acid charging. I'd also set the current quite low as the charger may not cope at higher currents. As the voltage reaches the set voltage, so charging will of course diminish. It's not ideal but is probably more accurate than may mains car battery chargers and at least as good, if not better as those used in burglar (12V) and fire (24V) alarms. In an emergency, for a few pennies, who really cares? In the past I'...

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    I have several of these little PSU's, they are general purpose step down PSUs (some provide step up/down). At the current supplied, charge curves will make little difference. SLA used to be used in older motorcycles with the crudest of chargers.I use the bigger PSU of this type to supply a steady current to my Li-Po charger ;)The voltage should be set to 13.8 V (not 14V) for lead acid charging. I'd also set the current quite low as the charger may not cope at higher currents. As the voltage reaches the set voltage, so charging will of course diminish. It's not ideal but is probably more accurate than may mains car battery chargers and at least as good, if not better as those used in burglar (12V) and fire (24V) alarms. In an emergency, for a few pennies, who really cares? In the past I've charged Ni-Cds via a length of co-ax cable with a car battery charger ;)In addition, this unit will charge a "flat" battery, whereas many of the "electronic" car battery chargers will refuse to supply a charge if the battery voltage is "too low". So useful to get some charge into the battery.I have to agree elsewhere, it's more of a "how to assemble" rather than "make", little more than stripping wires is shown - however still useful to those that don't know.

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  • Bit banging step-by-step: Arduino control of WS2811, WS2812, and WS2812B RGB LEDs

    Very good, nice and clear :)Counting instruction cycles and padding with NOPs, takes me back!For the beginner, who ought not be confused.... I've NEVER heard of a 'pulse wave' (other than in sci-fi films); One may send 'a pulse' or 'several pulses', or 'a train of pulses'. We use square waves in digital electronics (although the edges may get degraded).A 'pulse wave' does not imply square wave, and in this context is unhelpful and degrades the nomenclature (IMHO).It says that acrobotic is a "bloke" in the profile, although references above imply a female hand. The later I hope, as this piece is a strong role model for young women considering a career in electronics..... how it should be done ;)

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  • AlphaOmega1 completed the lesson Welcome to CNC in the class CNC Class1 year ago
  • AlphaOmega1 commented on icreatable's instructable How To Build A Floor For A House1 year ago
    How To Build A Floor For A House

    Nice little indestructible.An observation, not a comment about the OP. I thought UK houses were built as cheaply as possible and pretty poor today, but wow! No wonder we often see swathes of houses mown flat by hurricanes in the US, and sash99 states a 25 year lifespan! (I have window frames that are nearly 90 years old!) Surely such poor standards must verge on the criminal? No wonder we see your president telling people to flee for their lives in the face of a blow!BTW, how long do chipboard staircase stringers last? I see no bracing in the studwork, and I suspect the I-beams could use some herringboning too.Buy some bricks or quarry some stone guys! Didn't you hear about the wolf that huffed and puffed?

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on bekathwia's instructable Mounted Storage Jars1 year ago
    Mounted Storage Jars

    Nice! Takes me back, my father did this with peanut butter jars that were oval, so easy to twist. Must have been 45 years ago! I have a row of coffee jars hanging by their lids from a shelf. Highly recomended!Makes it easy to find nuts, bolts, screws and pins, and doubles storage space too.BTW, if you punch the lids with the inside facing up, you will not buckle the lid as it will be supported.

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  • Turn off headlights when ignition off

    Doesn't the buzzer remind him? Just make it louder :)Maybe replace it with a recording "If your battery goes flat, I'm not driving out at 3am to jump start your car, if your battery...." :DIdeally you want to control the lights through some logic. e.g. as followsignition on + light switch on : lights turn off when the ignition is turned off or the light switch is turned off (As you have it)Ignition off + lights on : lights turn off when light switch is off, or ignition turned on and off again. You may also want to include a delay-off timer while at it. If any one of your mods fails you may have quite an issue! The original setup is pretty robust. You must be able to turn the lights on and off as required. If either fail you may have a dangerous condition. Is a flat battery wo...

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    Doesn't the buzzer remind him? Just make it louder :)Maybe replace it with a recording "If your battery goes flat, I'm not driving out at 3am to jump start your car, if your battery...." :DIdeally you want to control the lights through some logic. e.g. as followsignition on + light switch on : lights turn off when the ignition is turned off or the light switch is turned off (As you have it)Ignition off + lights on : lights turn off when light switch is off, or ignition turned on and off again. You may also want to include a delay-off timer while at it. If any one of your mods fails you may have quite an issue! The original setup is pretty robust. You must be able to turn the lights on and off as required. If either fail you may have a dangerous condition. Is a flat battery worse than a crash?And, BTW, most modern cars (in Europe at least) use CAN or low current signals into the management unit that then controls systems using logic, so adding a light sensor gives, self dipping, auto switch on, auto switch off, delay off etc. this is fairly simply without complicated cabling and lots of relays.On my own car, my lights will turn off if the ignition is off AND I open the drivers door. If I want my side lights left on while away from the car, I have to turn my lights off, with the ignition off, and turn them on again!My wife's car has a buzzer! :( Never left them on.Nice clear instructable though :)

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  • AlphaOmega1 commented on fred.lam.5201's instructable A Marking Gauge You Can't Buy1 year ago
    A Marking Gauge You Can't Buy

    @ manuelmascSounds like you are newish to woodworking - check out Paul Sellers on YouTube (IMHO one of the very best). He will show you how to make and maintain tools too. Very clear, focused, down to earth, no assumptions, no shouting at the camera, so he's relaxing to listen to too!@ fred.lam.5201Very nice sir. Nothing like using your own tools to make other items and even other tools. There is something very special about personalised tools, especially when they are as aesthetically pleasing as yours marker is.

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  • Make 4 Useful Things From 9V Dead Battery

    That's why birds can sit on 220,000V lines and live, they are not grounded or connected to another phase. (do they get a static shock as their bodies charge?)

    Until sometime in the 1970's areas of Bristol had a 110V supply. As a kid I had a Saturday job at vacuum cleaner repair shop (some miles from Bristol) and we had a 110V supply for that very reason.BTW "it's the volts that jolts and the millies that killies" - so providing the time was short and the resistance high.... But not a smart way to test ;) Having said that, as kids we used a long length of grass to test cow fencers. Touch the wire with the tip and slowly slide the grass stem, making the distance to your hand shorter until you felt a jolt, or not!

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