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  • AndJoeG commented on ash_doge's instructable Delicious Homemade Mozzarella1 year ago
    Delicious Homemade Mozzarella

    I honestly had no idea making cheese was this easy - I always imagined it to be a difficult, drawn out process. This is really cool, thanks!

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    • Make a Seamless Captive Nut in a 3D Printed Part
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  • Make a Seamless Captive Nut in a 3D Printed Part

    Printing actual threads that properly mate can be a bit tricky, mainly due to support and sagging issues.Modeling the threads isn't too tricky. If you'd like I can whip up a quick little guide on how to do it in Fusion 360. I've seen people print good threaded items, but I've never had too much success. Let me know how it turns out though, especially if you find a way to make them come out well!

    Definitely! I'd love to see how it works for you, you should post the results! Feel free to shoot me a PM if you run into any problems.

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  • Make a Seamless Captive Nut in a 3D Printed Part

    Thank you! It's something I found was really cool, and I hope that others will think it's as neat as I do.

    Similair to what askjerry was saying, there's a couple reasons.One of the coolest to me is the fact that it's just not something you can do on a mill or lathe - only with additive machining can you have truly captive parts. And that's really cool to me.Another option is the fact that this can extend to more than just nuts - you can embed electronic components in a very similar way.And another consideration to keep in mind with regards to nuts is strength. Tapping directly into 3D printed plastic might not work so well - a lot of times 3D printers don't fill in the entire part, just the outside frame and a lattice on the inside (see towards the final step where you see the grid pattern in the half-printed part). This saves in both filament and weight. Tapping into the "hollow" ...

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    Similair to what askjerry was saying, there's a couple reasons.One of the coolest to me is the fact that it's just not something you can do on a mill or lathe - only with additive machining can you have truly captive parts. And that's really cool to me.Another option is the fact that this can extend to more than just nuts - you can embed electronic components in a very similar way.And another consideration to keep in mind with regards to nuts is strength. Tapping directly into 3D printed plastic might not work so well - a lot of times 3D printers don't fill in the entire part, just the outside frame and a lattice on the inside (see towards the final step where you see the grid pattern in the half-printed part). This saves in both filament and weight. Tapping into the "hollow" part might not give the results you want. Even with a solid print, the threads might not hold up to well against any reasonably load.

    I certainly consider a turners cube to be a captive part.And here's a good diagram showing what the infill looks like:http://img13.deviantart.net/558d/i/2014/041/a/4/3d_printing_infill_by_triplaxis-d75wmax.jpg

    Definitely. I was never able to get the Cura plugin to work to my satisfaction, which is one of the reasons I switched over to Repetier. To each their own, though!

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  • Make a Seamless Captive Nut in a 3D Printed Part

    You can do either, it's up to you. If you leave a gap you might have some bridging issues, but the nut will ultimately provide support. One thing to keep in mind is that the print head must absolutely clear the nut, so if you don't design the pocket deep enough you might have a crash.

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  • AndJoeG commented on jimbles's instructable Strawberry Mead (1 gallon)1 year ago
    Strawberry Mead (1 gallon)

    I made this, and it was delicious!

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  • AndJoeG commented on ash_doge's instructable Cold Brew Coffee!1 year ago
    Cold Brew Coffee!

    Wonderful 'ible! It was super smooth and really delicious, even with cheaper grounds. I'll definitely be making some larger batches in the future.I personally like my coffee a bit on the stronger side so I might leave it to steep for a bit longer or use some more grounds - but it's absolutely delicious as-is.

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