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  • How to Measure Temperature Very Accurately With an Arduino and a TSYS01 Temperature Sensor Board.

    Hello, the temperature sensor board used here doesn't use any external sensor(thermocouple etc.), so this sensor board doesn't propably work for you. The sensor used in this sensor board is the tsys01 integrated circuit: http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDelivery/DDECon...If you need fast reactions to temperature changes and temperatures in the class of 1000 ºC thermocouples of type K are propably your best bet. You can find thermocouple driver boards from adafruit, sparkfun or ebay, but they usually support only one thermocouple per board. Most of the thermocouples and boards give you something around ± 2 ºC accuracy.I did some searching and it seems that the thermocouple wire has problems withstanding 1000 ºC so most thermocouples meant for temperatures that hig...

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    Hello, the temperature sensor board used here doesn't use any external sensor(thermocouple etc.), so this sensor board doesn't propably work for you. The sensor used in this sensor board is the tsys01 integrated circuit: http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDelivery/DDECon...If you need fast reactions to temperature changes and temperatures in the class of 1000 ºC thermocouples of type K are propably your best bet. You can find thermocouple driver boards from adafruit, sparkfun or ebay, but they usually support only one thermocouple per board. Most of the thermocouples and boards give you something around ± 2 ºC accuracy.I did some searching and it seems that the thermocouple wire has problems withstanding 1000 ºC so most thermocouples meant for temperatures that high have a metal tip. The metal tip may make the thermocouple slower to respond to temperature changes and it may be more difficult the utilize a metal tipped sensor in you thesis.One option would also be to use an infrared based noncontact thermometer to measure the temperature, but the infrared sensors capable of 1000 ºC seem to be quite expensive.

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  • How to measure temperature very accurately with an Arduino and a TSYS01 Temperature Sensor Board.

    Thank you. I agree that the Dallas DS18B20 is a easy, cheap and quite accurate sensor to use even though it doesn't reach the specification of the more expensive tsys01. (±0.1°C vs ±0.5°C accuracy) ( 0.0001 vs 0.0625 resolution) (10 ms vs 750 interval between measurements) Have you measured how much the temperature values vary between different measurements in the same temperature? I mean how much difference there is between successive measurements in constant temperature?An interesting project/use for the tsys01 that comes to mind might be to calibrate cheaper temperature sensors for higher absolute accuracy. The low noise, high resolution and high accuracy should make this relatively easy with the tsys01. The calibrated sensor does ofcourse also need to be relati...

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    Thank you. I agree that the Dallas DS18B20 is a easy, cheap and quite accurate sensor to use even though it doesn't reach the specification of the more expensive tsys01. (±0.1°C vs ±0.5°C accuracy) ( 0.0001 vs 0.0625 resolution) (10 ms vs 750 interval between measurements) Have you measured how much the temperature values vary between different measurements in the same temperature? I mean how much difference there is between successive measurements in constant temperature?An interesting project/use for the tsys01 that comes to mind might be to calibrate cheaper temperature sensors for higher absolute accuracy. The low noise, high resolution and high accuracy should make this relatively easy with the tsys01. The calibrated sensor does ofcourse also need to be relatively low noise and high resolution and you would need to build a temperature controlled box of some kind. I think the process could be made quite automatic though.

    That was very interesting, thank you for sharing. From this I would deduce that the DS18B20 is quite a good sensor for the price.I did some preliminary testing with two tsys01 sensors connected to one another through the copper pad in room temperature of about 20 degrees and I remember the difference being around 0.03 degrees C. However, I would need to design a longer experiment to get more reliable results. Very small differences in the room or the measurement setup could be affecting my result.

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  • How to measure temperature very accurately with an Arduino and a TSYS01 Temperature Sensor Board.

    Then sensor itself is always going to be analog. In this sensor the analog circuit is confined inside the tsys01 QFN16 package of the temperature sensor. This means that the 24 bit ADC is inside the QFN16 package. The tsys01 chip communicates outside with digital signals.The tsys01 doesn't contain a processing unit for converting the ADC values to actual temperature values. Instead the raw ADC values are sent to the Arduino which performs the conversion from ADC values to temperature. This is done because having the processing circuit next to the ADC like in the Arduino integrated ADCs will produce noise in the ADC result. Because the tsys01 sensor is far away from the processing unit of the Arduino, there is no noise caused by the operation of the processing unit affecting the ADC resu...

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    Then sensor itself is always going to be analog. In this sensor the analog circuit is confined inside the tsys01 QFN16 package of the temperature sensor. This means that the 24 bit ADC is inside the QFN16 package. The tsys01 chip communicates outside with digital signals.The tsys01 doesn't contain a processing unit for converting the ADC values to actual temperature values. Instead the raw ADC values are sent to the Arduino which performs the conversion from ADC values to temperature. This is done because having the processing circuit next to the ADC like in the Arduino integrated ADCs will produce noise in the ADC result. Because the tsys01 sensor is far away from the processing unit of the Arduino, there is no noise caused by the operation of the processing unit affecting the ADC result. This also means that external ADCs have usually less noise than ones integrated into a microcontroller.At the beginning of operation the Arduino has to retreive the calibration parameters specific to each tsys01 sensor from the sensor. By using these parameters it is possible to calculate the real temperature value usign a fourth degree polynomial in the Arduino. The driver provided in the github repository handles these things pretty automatically. You only need to initialize a sensor object, order the start of the ADC, wait for the conversion to finish and then read the temperature values(the driver converts the ADC results to temperature automatically).This also means that if you have a calibrated sensor with an analog output the promised accuracy is not necessarily what you will get. The performance of the ADC you are adding after the analog sensor can still make the result worse.(It can never make it better.) The nice thing about digital output temperature sensors is that the manufacturer can provide a rating that will take account the ADC. If you want to get the best performance out of an analog sensor, you should propably consider using an external ADC. However, even then there is a change for some additional noise to get coupled to the measurement in the wires you are using to connect the analog sensor to the ADC. Because the connections between the ADC and the analog sensor inside the Tsys01 QFN16 package are very short, the should be very little noise getting coupled to them.

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  • How to measure temperature very accurately with an Arduino and a TSYS01 Temperature Sensor Board.

    The LM35 seems like a nice sensor and much easier to use than the tsys01 used in the temperature sensor board. However, the project the sensor board was originally designed for required a temperature sensor capable of atleast +/- 0.1 absolute accuracy at temperatures from 10 to 40 degree C. The tsys01 promises to provide +/- 0.1 degree accuracy from -5 to 50 degrees celsius and is therefore 2.5x as accurate as the LM35 in the desired range. The sensor board and driver obviously makes using the tsys01 much easier.There is also a very low amount of measurement noise while using the tsys01, I can get almost a hundred samples per second for a few seconds and have all of the values be within 0.01 degrees celsius of each other in my room. For longer times than that the room temperature is not...

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    The LM35 seems like a nice sensor and much easier to use than the tsys01 used in the temperature sensor board. However, the project the sensor board was originally designed for required a temperature sensor capable of atleast +/- 0.1 absolute accuracy at temperatures from 10 to 40 degree C. The tsys01 promises to provide +/- 0.1 degree accuracy from -5 to 50 degrees celsius and is therefore 2.5x as accurate as the LM35 in the desired range. The sensor board and driver obviously makes using the tsys01 much easier.There is also a very low amount of measurement noise while using the tsys01, I can get almost a hundred samples per second for a few seconds and have all of the values be within 0.01 degrees celsius of each other in my room. For longer times than that the room temperature is not stable enough. The LM35 seems to require usage of the ADC microcontroller to read the temperature values, which will introduce its own noise and error to the measurement. ADCs integrated to a microcontroller usually have much more noise than the ADC in the tsys01, because the operation of the processor causes some noise in to the ADC reading. In the case of the original project the high resolution with low noise was useful because it enabled a temperature control algorithm to react to rising or falling temperatures even before the temperature rose or fell 0.1 degrees C.It also has very low self heating (0.02 degrees celsius at 10 samples/second in still air). The LM35 seems to have self heating of 0.1 degrees celsius according to the datasheet.There is currently a research project ongoing at my university using an earlier version of the temperature sensor board that deals with the human perceived temperature sensation in which on some materials(mainly metal) some humans have been able to differentiate between temperature difference of 0.1 to 0.2 degrees celsius.If you want you can check the project documentation of the original project usign a prototype sensor here: https://wiki.aalto.fi/display/MEX/Constant+tempera...You can expand the bar on the left to show you more details about different parts.There is also some Matlab code for controlling temperature that was converted to Arduino code in here, it will get very difficult very soon though if you have no experience with optimal control theory:https://wiki.aalto.fi/display/MEX/Temperature+box+...

    The two pieces of PCB were designed for optionally mounting the sensor with M2.5 screws on a surface or on some other mounting point. The PCB was also designed to be easily cuttable, one can cut away the mounting pieces or the whole sensor island if small size is the most important parameter.The sensor island has small pads for soldering your own pin header or wires. Cutting of the sensor island will ofcourse remove the regulator, input protection and force you to use the I2C interface, but you can get a very small breakout board.The cutouts and lack of ground plane at the sensor island should help to prevent any possibility of heat conduction from the regulator or any other component on board. The high resolution can show very small differencess and heat conduction from wrong sources s...

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    The two pieces of PCB were designed for optionally mounting the sensor with M2.5 screws on a surface or on some other mounting point. The PCB was also designed to be easily cuttable, one can cut away the mounting pieces or the whole sensor island if small size is the most important parameter.The sensor island has small pads for soldering your own pin header or wires. Cutting of the sensor island will ofcourse remove the regulator, input protection and force you to use the I2C interface, but you can get a very small breakout board.The cutouts and lack of ground plane at the sensor island should help to prevent any possibility of heat conduction from the regulator or any other component on board. The high resolution can show very small differencess and heat conduction from wrong sources should be prevented.

    I don't really recommend cutting of the sensor island though unless you really know what you are doing.

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