loading
1Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • Attrill commented on Natalina's instructable Build a Soundproof Wall10 months ago
    Build a Soundproof Wall

    This covers the basic concepts very well. One thing that I've found works very well for decoupling is resilient channels (it's described in one of the links about decoupling). They're basically metal strips that you hang drywall on, and they're designed to absorb vibrations and prevent them from being passed onto the drywall. We live pretty close to the L in Chicago, and used thin sheetrock on our wall studs, channels attached onto that, and then 5/8" drywall hung on the channels. It made a huge difference in reducing the noise of the train in our house. Here are some other things to keep in mind for decoupling:- Use as few screws as you can get away with (usually 6 per 4'X8' piece of sheetrock) - Leave a 1/4" gap between all pieces of sheetrock. Fill the gaps between the shee...see more »This covers the basic concepts very well. One thing that I've found works very well for decoupling is resilient channels (it's described in one of the links about decoupling). They're basically metal strips that you hang drywall on, and they're designed to absorb vibrations and prevent them from being passed onto the drywall. We live pretty close to the L in Chicago, and used thin sheetrock on our wall studs, channels attached onto that, and then 5/8" drywall hung on the channels. It made a huge difference in reducing the noise of the train in our house. Here are some other things to keep in mind for decoupling:- Use as few screws as you can get away with (usually 6 per 4'X8' piece of sheetrock) - Leave a 1/4" gap between all pieces of sheetrock. Fill the gaps between the sheetrock with flexible caulk before skim coating with spackle. Fill the gaps at the ceiling and floor with fiberglass insulation.

    View Instructable »