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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    If you say so then i will not argue with you. I tested it myself, i asked 3 experienced electrotechnician's opinion, two of them are designing chargers and SMPS-t for years so i doubt they didn't know what are they talking about when they told me what i told you about that charge pump. Your free to go and try it yourself. IR2110 charge pump is not a boost converter with switching involved, it's just a simple capacitor with a reverse biased blocking diode allowing it to charge up when the mosfet is OFF and blocking it's discharge back to the solar panel side and forcing it's charge to go trough the IR and from there to the mosfet gate.

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    I don't know any alternative to the battery, well if you have 3kW solar panels i think you afford a 40-50Ah car battery it;s not that expensive, well it will work without battery but you need to make sure that the panels will always have sufficient output current, like an example if a small cloud will pas in front of the sun cause 3-4min shadow your inverter will first enter in protection because it will not have enough output for the load and it will force the load to stop. with IR2110 it's simple, voltage means potential difference 12V means a 12V difference between positive lead and Gnd/negative lead. The charge pump of IR2110 is just a simple capacitor and a blocking diode no boost converter or etc... now if you solar panel output is lets say 48V and the battery voltage is 45V w...see more »I don't know any alternative to the battery, well if you have 3kW solar panels i think you afford a 40-50Ah car battery it;s not that expensive, well it will work without battery but you need to make sure that the panels will always have sufficient output current, like an example if a small cloud will pas in front of the sun cause 3-4min shadow your inverter will first enter in protection because it will not have enough output for the load and it will force the load to stop. with IR2110 it's simple, voltage means potential difference 12V means a 12V difference between positive lead and Gnd/negative lead. The charge pump of IR2110 is just a simple capacitor and a blocking diode no boost converter or etc... now if you solar panel output is lets say 48V and the battery voltage is 45V what is the potential difference the capacitor can charge up ? 48-45 = 3V so your boost capacitor can charge up only to 3V not even near the required 8-10V. That is the reason of resistive load where on the OFF period on Source side you have 0V so potential charge voltage is input-0V si if you input is 48V then you have 48V-0V = 48V on the capacitor.

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    You can add as many diodes as you want it will not change anything, just read the DS of IR21xx and you will see that it needs a resistive load, what is a resistive load ? well anything that has 0V when Q2 is OFF. A battery is not a resistive load because when the mosfet is OFF if you measure the voltage between Gnd and Q2 source pin you will have 12V aka battery voltage and not the required 0V by IR21xx then the charge pump will fail -> Vgs will be very small something like 3-4V tops -> Mosfet will open only 30-40% -> mosfet = high value resistor and will burn out. Q3 burns out because sync buck converter needs a very strict timing and with a "home made" software + harder you will not achieve that timing and on Q3 you will short out the battery for very short periods ...see more »You can add as many diodes as you want it will not change anything, just read the DS of IR21xx and you will see that it needs a resistive load, what is a resistive load ? well anything that has 0V when Q2 is OFF. A battery is not a resistive load because when the mosfet is OFF if you measure the voltage between Gnd and Q2 source pin you will have 12V aka battery voltage and not the required 0V by IR21xx then the charge pump will fail -> Vgs will be very small something like 3-4V tops -> Mosfet will open only 30-40% -> mosfet = high value resistor and will burn out. Q3 burns out because sync buck converter needs a very strict timing and with a "home made" software + harder you will not achieve that timing and on Q3 you will short out the battery for very short periods of time. That diode you speak about would be needed after Q3 and inductor , right before battery + lead but then the efficiency will be even smaller than an async buck which i did.

    Solar Inverter without a battery will work but not for long, i tried your idea last summer and it has problems. Any consumer that uses a motor will need a short amp spike to start, that spike can be 3x the rated working amperage so if you have a motor rated at 1Amp it will need for 0.5s a 3amp supply to start and after that it will fall back to the normal 1Amp. This instant starting current may be lower or bigger depending the starting torque needed by the motor to speed up. Without battery you are limited to the panels output even if your panel can handle the power requirement of the motor you can't give that x3 instant power to start it up and not last any small shadow on the panel will force the inverter in protection. If you don't need to store the energy and you want to use it dir...see more »Solar Inverter without a battery will work but not for long, i tried your idea last summer and it has problems. Any consumer that uses a motor will need a short amp spike to start, that spike can be 3x the rated working amperage so if you have a motor rated at 1Amp it will need for 0.5s a 3amp supply to start and after that it will fall back to the normal 1Amp. This instant starting current may be lower or bigger depending the starting torque needed by the motor to speed up. Without battery you are limited to the panels output even if your panel can handle the power requirement of the motor you can't give that x3 instant power to start it up and not last any small shadow on the panel will force the inverter in protection. If you don't need to store the energy and you want to use it directly when the panels are generating you don't need a big battery a 15-20Ah is fine but you will need one if you don't want to kill the inverter and damage the consumers.

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    Looks nice, i don't want to discourage you but it will work until you will hook the battery after that you will wounder why Q3 aka the lower mosfet burns out and the upper one aka Q2 is so hot that you will burn your finger if you touch it.

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    Well i can't understand how you git 30V on Pin5 ( GND ) maybe on pin8 (Vcc). What you can do add a 100ohm series resistor between the boost converter output and pin8 (Vcc) and a clamp diode from pin8(Vcc) to pin5(Gnd), it look's like this http://www.electrical4u.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/zener-diode-voltage-regulator.png , the output voltge will be equal to the zenner diode voltage so you would need to use a +15V one maybe.

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    With a 14V battery voltage you need to get 34V output from the 555 / boost converter, to get 20V on IX's supply ( 34-14 = 20V) less probably that you will get such high voltages, it's nearly impossible just if you boost converter malfunction and rises the voltage above selected one. Anyway you can use a simple clamp zener to protect the IC, as you can see i have one to on the 555 input ( a resistor + 15V zener ). Well none of voltage regulators are designed to work without battery, almost all of "high end" chargers have a warning sign saying that you should never disconnect the battery's before you disconnect the Solar Panels.

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    Well connecting directly to solar input is not something good because you don't have 8V difference, if you hold the solar panel at 17.5V then you barely get a 4V and that Mosfet is acting like a big value resistor... same problem in the original schematic with the charge pump getting only 3-4V Vgs and as you can see mosfets got burned one after other. For testing it's ok. but make sure you have a decent heat-sink on that mosfet.I don't tried with boost converter but it should work.

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    555's square wave is not going as square wave to the TLP, if you follow the schematic you will see that 555's output is square waving a capacitor that capacitor when is fully charger to 12V it discharges to the second capacitor on the output, so the second capacitor will hold smooth 24V dc, if the capacitor is large ( is use 22uH) it will hold enough dc voltage to charge couple of times the mosfets gate which is in the range of nF's, then the 55 completes the next cycle and charges the capacitor again. Anyway the 555's frequency should be at least equal of arduino's one or higher.Arduino's PWM is linked to the Pin2 which activates the internal logic circuit which on HIGH signal will pull the mosfet gate to pin8 and on LOW signal will pull the gate to pin 5, on short it opens / closes ...see more »555's square wave is not going as square wave to the TLP, if you follow the schematic you will see that 555's output is square waving a capacitor that capacitor when is fully charger to 12V it discharges to the second capacitor on the output, so the second capacitor will hold smooth 24V dc, if the capacitor is large ( is use 22uH) it will hold enough dc voltage to charge couple of times the mosfets gate which is in the range of nF's, then the 55 completes the next cycle and charges the capacitor again. Anyway the 555's frequency should be at least equal of arduino's one or higher.Arduino's PWM is linked to the Pin2 which activates the internal logic circuit which on HIGH signal will pull the mosfet gate to pin8 and on LOW signal will pull the gate to pin 5, on short it opens / closes the mosfet.There is no such thing that "is going nowhere" it is going somewhere most possible in heat, some components or the mosftet doesn't got the minimum 8V gate voltage and opened only partially acting like a high value resistor generating 300mA worth of heat. Then also take in conisderation the circuit consumption, LCD back-light, arduino, 555, for all of this you use linear regulators ( LM78xx) those generate a lot of heat to = again power losses in heat) etc... my circuit eat's around 100mA not taking in consideration the looses in the mosfet / blocking diode on the solar input,etc...

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  • ARDUINO MPPT SOLAR CHARGE CONTROLLER (Version-3.0)

    The reason is simple, on the OFF period the mosfet gate need to be pulled to Source pin voltage = positive rail of the battery so pin 5 need to be connected to the positive rail. Anyway there is no such thing that Vcc need to connected to 0V aka ground, the powering voltage in datasheets is the voltage difference between Vcc and Vdd si in the TLP's case Vdd is +22V from 555 ,Vcc +12V from battery that means that is powered at 22-12 = 12V.

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