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  • Time-Lapse Photography Processing Using GIMP

    i'm confused!i have been struggling to find a tutorial on how to make a series of time-lapse photos into an animated gif or video with gimp/gap.however i aint finding any and did think that this tutorial was to teach how to do that.the title reads "timelapse photography processing using gimp" so iot appeared to be what i was after. however, it appears to be more about processing the images themselves, rather than about how to arrange them in a sequence to be turned into an animation by using gimp.can ANYONE please tell me how to do this?all the info anywhere is incomplete, cluttered with other processes, or not at all about making a series of photos into an animation as if the photos were frames in an old roll of movie film.

    yes, i read over this again and it seems to jump from loading the photos into your computer then stright into processing the photos, but it dosen't seem to tell me how to actually tell me how to make the photos act like frame in a movie reel, so to speak, that a little animation ccan be made from. that part, for me the most important part, is missing.as it does from almost every tutorial i've seen so far.it certainly isn't at all clear for me in gimp, so i can't so far just learn by fumbling around till it works as there is simply no easy way to see round this issue for me.thank you so very kindly to anyone who may be able to advise.

    answering my own query here.but for anyone finding this page with a similar need, then THIS is what you need for animating time-lapse photos as if they were frames in a reel of movie film:http://gimpedia.tumblr.com/post/24873634363

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  • BillD8 commented on buildingupbob's instructable Making A Plywood Upright Bass11 months ago
    Making A Plywood Upright Bass

    lovely.~i wish i could see the drawings though!is it able to tolerate metal strings?can it handle being slapped"?if so, is the neck re-enforced? (it wasn't clear in the list there)

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  • BillD8 commented on Huntfish's instructable Sub Woofer Box 11 months ago
    Sub Woofer Box

    would do most folk, but it is not ideal.generally sub bass speakers need to have an opening and special cut dimensions inside to make those lower frequencies come to life.

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  • BillD8 commented on Marsh's instructable Build an Inexpensive Sub-woofer11 months ago
    Build an Inexpensive Sub-woofer

    usually in sub-woofer cabinet design i would expect a "folder-horn" inside.this in effect means, for example, recreating the dimensional theory behind a tuba! which in the case of a tuba means the "horn" begins as a small piece where the vibration to be amplified begins, and a horn coming from the mouthpiece which builds deeper and deeper frequencies till it gets to the wide end peice where you here most of the sound from.in the case of a folder horn bass speaker, we have the speaker itself (like the vibrating mouthpiece on a tuba) generally facing the front and on the front of the cabinet, but NOT always (back loaded).directly behind the speaker cone (in a front loaded bass speaker) you'd have a hole cut that acts as the beginning of a wooden tunnel that folds it's...

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    usually in sub-woofer cabinet design i would expect a "folder-horn" inside.this in effect means, for example, recreating the dimensional theory behind a tuba! which in the case of a tuba means the "horn" begins as a small piece where the vibration to be amplified begins, and a horn coming from the mouthpiece which builds deeper and deeper frequencies till it gets to the wide end peice where you here most of the sound from.in the case of a folder horn bass speaker, we have the speaker itself (like the vibrating mouthpiece on a tuba) generally facing the front and on the front of the cabinet, but NOT always (back loaded).directly behind the speaker cone (in a front loaded bass speaker) you'd have a hole cut that acts as the beginning of a wooden tunnel that folds it's way round in a spiral, and generally exits in a wide hole (the width of the cabinet) generally, but not always, below the speaker cone.the effect here is that it offers the ideal bandwidth of waves needed for genuine sub-bass in wooden cabinet design.also, generally, we would expect baltic plywood (no "voids" in the ply layers!)and the glue used to make the ply to be heat/boil/steam/water resitant.thye speaker above from it's appearnace and dimensions looks ideally more suited to perhaps a bass guitar speaker unit?here is a very expensive exampl: https://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FJS/72NG/...and here is a more typical DIY sub bass speaker (back loaded in this case, meaning the speaker driver is mounted inside and in the "back" of the cabinet) example:http://es.virtualdj.com/image/62537/48114/folded%20horn%20sub.gif

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