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  • BillyStuart commented on macrossmaniac's instructable How to Make a Log Cabin Retreat6 days ago
    How to Make a Log Cabin Retreat

    This is incredible.

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  • BillyStuart commented on BillyStuart's instructable Finnish Sauna1 week ago
    Finnish Sauna

    The high voltage lines (one 20amp, and one 50amp breaker) are in pipe. Our local code call for 30” minimum for direct burial and 12” for in pipe. The direct burial cat6 is not in the pipe, but is in the same trench, separated enough to prevent EMI. The Shaw LVT I used features their newer Floorte LifeGuard waterproof core tech and is pretty solid. Guaranteed waterproof for 25 years. It’s the flooring they recommend for flood plains, so I’m pretty sure the few drops that make it through the heater will be just fine. The subfloor is AdvanTech sheathing, lifetime garaunteed to prevent swelling. I saw a stress test where they threw a sheet in a pond, retrieved it a week later, and it was still perfectly flat and free of swelling. Again, pretty sure it could hand a f...

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    The high voltage lines (one 20amp, and one 50amp breaker) are in pipe. Our local code call for 30” minimum for direct burial and 12” for in pipe. The direct burial cat6 is not in the pipe, but is in the same trench, separated enough to prevent EMI. The Shaw LVT I used features their newer Floorte LifeGuard waterproof core tech and is pretty solid. Guaranteed waterproof for 25 years. It’s the flooring they recommend for flood plains, so I’m pretty sure the few drops that make it through the heater will be just fine. The subfloor is AdvanTech sheathing, lifetime garaunteed to prevent swelling. I saw a stress test where they threw a sheet in a pond, retrieved it a week later, and it was still perfectly flat and free of swelling. Again, pretty sure it could hand a few drops if they somehow managed to seep through a 25 year garaunteed waterproof floor, and then past the water and vapor barrier, and then on the sheathing. Doubt it ever gets there, but if it does, I have no worries. Several woods can be used. In my area cedar was both economical and I preferred the aroma cedar leaves behind for several years. My hygrometer reads back to ambient humidity after about 20 minutes after I turn it on after I’m done. Do you know what it would cost to put in a humidity sensing automatic exhaust fan? I love how everyone point out what they believe are all the things I didn’t research. I invested well over 100 hours of research and consulted friends who are architects, electricians, and flooring specialists. I’m sure it’s not perfect. It’s a DIY project that requires a ton of learning along the way... I’m happy to address why i made each decision. Some were done for sheer economics and others based on tech advances that eliminated old concerns.

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  • BillyStuart commented on BillyStuart's instructable Finnish Sauna1 week ago
    Finnish Sauna

    HI, Allen. Sorry about the roof pics. I was so focused on getting it done that day, that I forgot to take any photos. Next time I get the ladder out, I'll climb up there and take some detail shots.The heater does warm up the changing room quite well. Last winter, the heater was connected and running by February, and I used it to heat the space while I built the benches and finished all the details. It was below 0 on several occasions, and I was actually working in my boxers and a t-shirt after a while, despite it being so cold outside. We're in Central Illinois, so we get 4 proper seasons. Hot summer, cold winters.What I have been doing this fall, is propping the door open (just an inch or two) during the +/-20 mins of preheating, and the changing room is warm while the sauna ge...

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    HI, Allen. Sorry about the roof pics. I was so focused on getting it done that day, that I forgot to take any photos. Next time I get the ladder out, I'll climb up there and take some detail shots.The heater does warm up the changing room quite well. Last winter, the heater was connected and running by February, and I used it to heat the space while I built the benches and finished all the details. It was below 0 on several occasions, and I was actually working in my boxers and a t-shirt after a while, despite it being so cold outside. We're in Central Illinois, so we get 4 proper seasons. Hot summer, cold winters.What I have been doing this fall, is propping the door open (just an inch or two) during the +/-20 mins of preheating, and the changing room is warm while the sauna gets pretty darn hot.I started with a 12kW heater, and returned it before I ever hooked it up, as it was extreme overkill. The 9kW I ended up with is still larger than would be needed for a 6x8x7 sauna. I think a 6kW would have been plenty, but I wanted it pretty powerful simply for the changing room to warm up too. My wife likes the sauna extremely hot (she gets it above 200 degrees f, but I prefer it around 175-180).While I saved most of my receipts, I have not added them up. I'm almost afraid to, as this project was originally supposed to be a reclaimed pallet wood project with a DIY wood burning stove. But I got into it, changed the entire scope, and went a little nuts. When I first drew up the plans for reclaimed pallet wood and a DIY wood stove with my wife, it was supposed to be less than $800, but I pulled the old bait n' switch on her. ;)I think the basic structure was about $1,800 for skids, framing, roof, and insulation. Another $200 for flooring, $1,000 for siding, $600 for the heater & stones, $1,000 for the cedar wood on the inside, and $350 for the pine. I spent about $350 on my electrical contractor (he was a friend and cut me a good deal) and another $500 in various electrical parts. The little detail things add up, and I'm sure that's at least another $500-1,000. If I had to ballpark it, I would say I spent between $6-8K in hard cost, and hundreds of hours of research and labor (but I really enjoy both). I need to scan in all the receipts and dig through my emails for everythingI ordered online. At some point this winter, I'll assemble all that and edit the post.I only needed a second set of hands on framing day, and on the siding. Everything else (except for the electrical) I did solo.

    In our local municipality, a building permit (and inspections) are require for anything larger than 100 sq ft. 8x12=96sq ft, so I needed no permission or any sort of permit. :)

    Ah, now I understand what you meant. Yes, I cut down some cedar 2x4 (inches) into slats that are 1-1.5 cm thick, and attached those to the 3 exterior walls and ceiling (not the wall between the sauna and changing room, even though I probably should have) after putting up the insulation, but behind the cedar. I also left a small (maybe 1cm?) gap at the floor to allow air to circulate. That's part of why I did the LED lighting around the floor the way I did, so that it covers up this gap nicely.We plan to stay in this house for about 5-7 years, and our next home will be our "forever" home. I learned from a lot of my mistakes on this one, so when I build the next one, I'll have a much easier time. I still wonder if I made the right call going with electric vs. wood, but we'r...

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    Ah, now I understand what you meant. Yes, I cut down some cedar 2x4 (inches) into slats that are 1-1.5 cm thick, and attached those to the 3 exterior walls and ceiling (not the wall between the sauna and changing room, even though I probably should have) after putting up the insulation, but behind the cedar. I also left a small (maybe 1cm?) gap at the floor to allow air to circulate. That's part of why I did the LED lighting around the floor the way I did, so that it covers up this gap nicely.We plan to stay in this house for about 5-7 years, and our next home will be our "forever" home. I learned from a lot of my mistakes on this one, so when I build the next one, I'll have a much easier time. I still wonder if I made the right call going with electric vs. wood, but we're in a residential area, and I don't have any forest to go cut my own wood from, and didn't want the hassle or expense of constantly sourcing/hauling/splitting it.

    It’s supposed to be for water running down, with the grain. I looked into it, and found that’s a tradition stemming from before tongue and groove boards and isn’t necessary. I chose horizontal because: a. with tongue and groove, water won’t run between the boards, so while his advice is traditional, it’s not critical. And b. the cost of a 6’ board verses an 8’ board was actually significant. With vertical, I would have had to purchase all 8’ boards and cut them down wasting several 1’ sections. I was able to get away with mostly 6’ pieces with very little waste on 3 sides (including side with door) and the ceiling. Only needed 8’ for the back wall.

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  • BillyStuart commented on BillyStuart's instructable Finnish Sauna1 week ago
    Finnish Sauna

    Thanks, Tuomas! If a Finn likes it, I know I've done something right! I considered pouring a concrete slab, tiling the entire thing, and then putting down duckboard (I think that's similar to the wooden slats that you described), but the concrete work was just too overwhelming, and would have require both equipment and skills that I'm lacking...

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