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  • How to make a teleidoscope (open-view and lense kaleidoscope)

    The dome would definitely allow the needed light in. A hemisphere or sphere is definitely something to experiment with. Probably a personal preference depending upon what you are looking at. I find experimenting with the different variables and what that does to what you are looking at, either inside or outside of the 'scope is 50% of the fun.30% is just the fun of LOOKING and SEEING and EXPERIENCING. And 20% is coming up with new combinations to try. And then the fun starts all over again. We made some kaleidoscopes with a clear ring of acrylic separating the bits and pieces you were looking at from the mirrors. You could hold it up sideways (hence called a sidelight kaleidoscope) to a light, even a flashlight, so you could see a more dense arrangement which didn't allow much light in...

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    The dome would definitely allow the needed light in. A hemisphere or sphere is definitely something to experiment with. Probably a personal preference depending upon what you are looking at. I find experimenting with the different variables and what that does to what you are looking at, either inside or outside of the 'scope is 50% of the fun.30% is just the fun of LOOKING and SEEING and EXPERIENCING. And 20% is coming up with new combinations to try. And then the fun starts all over again. We made some kaleidoscopes with a clear ring of acrylic separating the bits and pieces you were looking at from the mirrors. You could hold it up sideways (hence called a sidelight kaleidoscope) to a light, even a flashlight, so you could see a more dense arrangement which didn't allow much light in.PS It's amazing to look at flowers in a garden with a teleidoscope.

    I made a teleidoscope at a class at John C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC. Instructor Scott . . . I recommend using the dome on the end away from eye. I used a hemisphere. But I seem to be missing the cover for the eye end in your directions. This isn't necessary to make either the teleidoscope or kaleidoscope work properly--I think it's just for looks and safety--keeping the inner workings a mystery. We cut and polished circles of glass for the eye piece and had brass ring fittings to go over the dome and eyepiece both. You could cut an acrylic sheet, like a transparency into the right diameter circle to protect your eyes from small mirror fragments which might break off. Then put your paper, tape, etc. around everything. Or cut the solid end off of a skinny jar lid? The 'sco...

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    I made a teleidoscope at a class at John C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC. Instructor Scott . . . I recommend using the dome on the end away from eye. I used a hemisphere. But I seem to be missing the cover for the eye end in your directions. This isn't necessary to make either the teleidoscope or kaleidoscope work properly--I think it's just for looks and safety--keeping the inner workings a mystery. We cut and polished circles of glass for the eye piece and had brass ring fittings to go over the dome and eyepiece both. You could cut an acrylic sheet, like a transparency into the right diameter circle to protect your eyes from small mirror fragments which might break off. Then put your paper, tape, etc. around everything. Or cut the solid end off of a skinny jar lid? The 'scopes of my youth had cardboard circles as an eyepiece, with a 1/2 inch hole cut in it. Don't remember anything covering that hole. My teleidoscope is standing up in the center. Perhaps you can make out the brass rings on both ends of the kaleidoscopes and teleidoscope?ps the 3 mirror arrangement DOES produce hexagonal patterns. But the number of mirrors is a cool variable to experiment with. How many pattern repeats would you get if you used 6 mirrors? 5?

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