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3Instructables36,846Views39CommentsViltvogel VIJoined January 2nd, 2009

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  • Cure Diabetes With Water Therapy

    When someone makes a claim about something - such as a cure for diabetes, they have the responsibility of supplying supporting evidence. Without such evidence, the claim is worthless. Claims require evidence. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. The burden of proof is always on the person making an assertion or proposition. No-one else has any obligation to find the evidence on your behalf.To quote the late Christopher Hitchens: "That which can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence". Provide some proper (i.e. peer reviews journal papers) evidence that there is a water cure, or the logical conclusion is that there is no evidence, and the claims can be dismissed.

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  • Cure Diabetes With Water Therapy

    Could you point to the supposed erroneous errors? (And whilst you're at it, still would like to see those "numerous medical research reports" you said support your views, and answers to those questions I posted such as what exactly are the toxins you're supposed to get from processed food, and the mechanism by which "red blood cells are fermented into sugar").Beyond that - you are the one making the claims, therefore it is up to you to back them up. Suggesting that I have unnecessary blood samples taken and analysed (and I'm not sure what you'd have me get analysed anyway) goes no way toward any form of evidence. However some journal papers on the subject of properly conducted trials into a water cure for diabetes would be useful.Here's the thing - if this treatment ...

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    Could you point to the supposed erroneous errors? (And whilst you're at it, still would like to see those "numerous medical research reports" you said support your views, and answers to those questions I posted such as what exactly are the toxins you're supposed to get from processed food, and the mechanism by which "red blood cells are fermented into sugar").Beyond that - you are the one making the claims, therefore it is up to you to back them up. Suggesting that I have unnecessary blood samples taken and analysed (and I'm not sure what you'd have me get analysed anyway) goes no way toward any form of evidence. However some journal papers on the subject of properly conducted trials into a water cure for diabetes would be useful.Here's the thing - if this treatment did work, it would be an absolute medical breakthrough that would free people from lifelong treatment (not to mention all of those potential risks that diabetics have such as renal failure, loss of limbs, blindness etc). But medical breakthroughs require proper scientific evidence to back them up and show they work. I have no doubt that the person who could actually empirically prove such a therapy existed would win a Nobel Prize. So again - if there are any, please give us the references to the journal papers. Would be more than happy to be corrected if there is accurate and verifiable scientific evidence to back it up (and I must insist on proper peer-reviewed papers, not random websites or YouTube videos).

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  • Cure Diabetes With Water Therapy

    Unfortunately foryour dismissal friend, I did watch the video prior to commenting.So questions - what arethese "toxins" you claim are in refined foods? I mentionthis because that word is beloved of alternative medicinepractitioners without specifying what they are. Your body has its ownelegantly designed system for removing substances that could bepotentially harmful - namely, the liver, kidneys and spleen. So canyou give the name of one of these supposed toxins that avoids beingdealt with by these systems? And given that you already have systemsto remove such things, it follows that there is no need for anexternal process of "detoxification" to remove "toxins".How are red blood cells"fermented into sugar"? This comes across as a basicmisunderstan...

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    Unfortunately foryour dismissal friend, I did watch the video prior to commenting.So questions - what arethese "toxins" you claim are in refined foods? I mentionthis because that word is beloved of alternative medicinepractitioners without specifying what they are. Your body has its ownelegantly designed system for removing substances that could bepotentially harmful - namely, the liver, kidneys and spleen. So canyou give the name of one of these supposed toxins that avoids beingdealt with by these systems? And given that you already have systemsto remove such things, it follows that there is no need for anexternal process of "detoxification" to remove "toxins".How are red blood cells"fermented into sugar"? This comes across as a basicmisunderstanding of biology. Red blood cells are the cells in yourbody that contain haemoglobin to carry oxygen around. They last forapprox 120 days then are got rid of by the spleen. The iron and othercomponents are broken down and then absorbed, and what remains isexcreted. This is a natural process. Cells do not get turned into sugar. You cannot ferment somethingINTO sugar. Fermentation is a metabolic process that converts sugarsinto other things - acids (e.g. lactic acid), gases or alcohol.The idea behind analkaline diet is that the foods we eat can have an effect on the pHlevels inside our body, and that eating certain foods have a tendencyto raise the acidity within the body, and other foods help to makethe body more alkaline. The idea is also that foods that cause thebody to become more acidic raise the risk for long term healthconditions including diabetes. But here's the thing - the natural pHof your body is between 7.35 to 7.45, which is slightly alkaline.Your body controls its pH very tightly because even comparativelysmall changes in pH can have serious effects on how proteins andother systems in the body function. If your pH level increases ordecreases by as little as 0.4, it can be fatal (so less than 7.0. andgreater than 7.7). Your body's pH level is carefully maintained viaseveral ways, mainly by the kidneys and the lungs, with the help ofbuffers in the blood. Food starts to be broken down by your salivaand is then swallowed where it enters the stomach. The stomachdigests food by using your stomach acid, this is as the name states –an acidic substance that is unchanged by the pH level in food. Allfood that leaves your stomach will be acidic. When it enters yourintestines, secretions from your pancreas neutralise the stomachacids and the food becomes alkaline. Because of this, whether yourfood is acidic or alkaline when you eat it, it will have no affect onthe pH level of your blood.Then there are the moreobvious things – that all white foods are bad that are high incalories, and low in fibre. What about onions, cauliflower, turnips,white beans, and white potatoes? These can be part of a healthy diet.With regards to theso-called “water cure” - adding baking soda to water is basicallyadding bicarbonate to it, this making it more alkaline. But for thereasons I've already explained, this would have no effect on bloodpH. Activated charcoal is used to absorb poisons in the stomach inthe case of some overdoses. But it wouldn't have any effect on yourblood. Peppermint oil has been shown in vitro to affect blood glucose(i.e. in a test tube or glass dish), but there is little evidence toshow that this effect is replicated in the body. It should also benoted that large doses of peppermint oil can be toxic, it can makegallstones worse, and it can interfere with certain medications. There's also an issuewith the suggestion of drinking 4 litres of water a day. Currentmedical advice is that men need about 2 litres a day, and women 1.6litres a day (we get about another 500ml from our food). 4 litres isa lot more than you need. Your kidneys can deal with about 800ml –1 litre of water an hour. So depending on how quickly you drink thatwater it would either mean you'll be going to the loo an awful lot,or running the risk of water intoxication (drinking too much tooquickly, which can be harmful). Some of the things youare suggesting – such as eating more veggies, are long establishedcommon sense dietary advice (but not because they're “detoxifying”or “alkaline”). Likewise diabetics limiting sugar intake iscommon sense. But you'd get all of this from a dietician or a doctorwithout any reference to any fantastic system or mention of toxins orother buzzwords. Could it be that you have your diabetes undercontrol just because you are eating a healthy balanced diet rich inveggies and low in carbs and sugars?And to suggest thatpeople reduce their medication – which would be prescribed by atrained health care professional, is that really sensible advice? Ifyou're thinking of following this video, talk to your doctor beforeyou even start.(BTW you say“Scientific evidence can be verified from numerous medical researchreports”. Perhaps you could provide some references? Proper journalpapers preferably, not YouTube videos)

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  • Cure Diabetes With Water Therapy

    It would be sensible to point out that so-called "water therapy" isn't actually supported by actual scientific evidence. I get that being diagnosed with diabetes is shocking, and that people who get this diagnosis are apt to grab onto any claim that might help, but that just because someone has some anecdotes and a YouTube video, doesn't make it true.Following a non-evidence based therapy is dangerous, in my opinion, because people may try that rather than keep to proper treatment, based solely on this claim. And here's the thing - not keeping control of your blood glucose levels (whether you're a type 1 or type 2 diabetic) can have potentially serious ramifications down the road - blindness, kidney failure, losing toes, even ending up in hospital with life-threatening keto-ac...

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    It would be sensible to point out that so-called "water therapy" isn't actually supported by actual scientific evidence. I get that being diagnosed with diabetes is shocking, and that people who get this diagnosis are apt to grab onto any claim that might help, but that just because someone has some anecdotes and a YouTube video, doesn't make it true.Following a non-evidence based therapy is dangerous, in my opinion, because people may try that rather than keep to proper treatment, based solely on this claim. And here's the thing - not keeping control of your blood glucose levels (whether you're a type 1 or type 2 diabetic) can have potentially serious ramifications down the road - blindness, kidney failure, losing toes, even ending up in hospital with life-threatening keto-acidosis.Any claim of a therapy that will make diabetes "go away" leaves you with the impression that "all you have to do" is drink this stuff and you can go on eating all the junk you want, without concern. Diabetes will not go away. Period. There are many things we can do to help control our blood glucose but, even if we are seeing normal numbers, that doesn’t mean that diabetes is gone. It’s still there, lurking, ready to rear its ugly head if we should stray from the path that is working for us. We need to accept that reality and move on.

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