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  • Catley commented on ShiftyTips's instructable How to cut a rope with itself3 months ago
    How to cut a rope with itself

    "A line over the parachute or another line will cut right through." Also a good thing to know, though I never expect to go skydiving!

    Couldn't agree more with your comment. It can be a life-saver if you know how to improvise.I do go around with a tiny first-aid kit such as you describe, plus folding scissors and a small bottle of a prescription med. I take--(just in case I am in an accident and hospitalized, because I understand that hospitals may charge a ridiculous amount for each Rx pill they supply you with. This habit saved me come money once, but note that the hospital pharmacist did insist on inspecting both the pills and the label. By the way, they made me feel that they were doing me a favor by letting me take my own medicine that was paid for by my insurance!).

    True, but the ible does say that it will work for thicker things, only taking more time. Would you want to spend who knows how much time watching a video of someone cutting a 1-cm-thick rope using this ible? LOL

    Thanks for the ible and thanks to Damn Pigs as well.Not being a camper, my first thought was how to use it to break free from restraint. I hope I would never need it, but I am grateful for the suggestion about paracord as shoelaces. The world being what it is today, who knows when someone might need this hint.

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  • Catley commented on momoluv's instructable How To Cleanly Remove Blackheads Painlessly!3 months ago
    How To Cleanly Remove Blackheads Painlessly!

    "Worserer; that's a good one! LOLBut...Who is your granddad? Oldmanbreadboard? Wow! I wasn't really trying to correct him, because I believe that "sayings" do NOT have to conform to modern grammar; in fact, they would often lose their charm if put in proper modern English. Unfortunately, being an English tutor and a translator, I tend to be alert to grammar details, so I got sucked in by a couple of comments other people made about "hung"--particularly one in which another poster was called a "stupid troll." That upset me, but I can't find that post here any more. I should have written, "It is the use of "hung" in Oldmanbreadboard's comment that would not make sense" and ADDED to that, "in strictly grammatical modern English&q...see more »"Worserer; that's a good one! LOLBut...Who is your granddad? Oldmanbreadboard? Wow! I wasn't really trying to correct him, because I believe that "sayings" do NOT have to conform to modern grammar; in fact, they would often lose their charm if put in proper modern English. Unfortunately, being an English tutor and a translator, I tend to be alert to grammar details, so I got sucked in by a couple of comments other people made about "hung"--particularly one in which another poster was called a "stupid troll." That upset me, but I can't find that post here any more. I should have written, "It is the use of "hung" in Oldmanbreadboard's comment that would not make sense" and ADDED to that, "in strictly grammatical modern English" and made it clear that I wasn't trying to correct the language of the saying. "Sayings"--fine. Regionalisms--I love 'em. But they are not the model followed in the grammar books, although grammar books will, as I mentioned, inevitably get rewritten and rewritten as time passes, because things that were once considered unacceptable often become common usage.OK, so re 'the day that will come' -- Not the day your grandad will be right, unless he is in the habit of using "hung" in ordinary speech as the past participle referring to an execution that cut off someone's breath; maybe he likes to use it because it is widely used where he lives, so it is correct there, but not yet in grammar books. I don't really care and have no interest in insulting anyone, so I hope (or should it be "wish") no one would feel that I have insulted them or their relatives.

    "Worserer; that's a good one! LOLBut...Who is your granddad? Oldmanbreadboard? Wow! I wasn't really trying to correct him, because I believe that "sayings" do NOT have to conform to modern grammar; in fact, they would often lose their charm if put in proper modern English. Unfortunately, being an English tutor and a translator, I tend to be alert to grammar details, so I got sucked in by a couple of comments other people made about "hung"--particularly one in which another poster was called a "stupid troll." That upset me, but I can't find that post here any more. I should have written, "It is the use of "hung" in Oldmanbreadboard's comment that would not make sense" and ADDED to that, "in strictly grammatical modern English&q...see more »"Worserer; that's a good one! LOLBut...Who is your granddad? Oldmanbreadboard? Wow! I wasn't really trying to correct him, because I believe that "sayings" do NOT have to conform to modern grammar; in fact, they would often lose their charm if put in proper modern English. Unfortunately, being an English tutor and a translator, I tend to be alert to grammar details, so I got sucked in by a couple of comments other people made about "hung"--particularly one in which another poster was called a "stupid troll." That upset me, but I can't find that post here any more. I should have written, "It is the use of "hung" in Oldmanbreadboard's comment that would not make sense" and ADDED to that, "in strictly grammatical modern English" and made it clear that I wasn't trying to correct the language of the saying. "Sayings"--fine. Regionalisms--I love 'em. But they are not the model followed in the grammar books, although grammar books will, as I mentioned, inevitably get rewritten and rewritten as time passes, as things that were once considered unacceptable become common usage.OK, so re 'the day that will come' -- Not the day your grandad will be right, unless he is in the habit of using "hung" in ordinary speech as the past participle referring to an execution that cut off someone's breath; maybe he likes to use it because it is widely used where he lives, so it is correct there, but not yet in grammar books. I don't really care and have no interest in insulting anyone, so I hope (or should it be "wish") no one would feel that I have insulted them or their relatives.

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  • Catley commented on momoluv's instructable How To Cleanly Remove Blackheads Painlessly!3 months ago
    How To Cleanly Remove Blackheads Painlessly!

    Would like not to have to read "Get over yourself" and "stupid troll" (in someone else's comment above). Things like that hurt people and are against the policy of the site.

    Thanks for the nice ible! Going to try it!KimkaschiIler: Thanks. I don't care what the things are called, but I appreciated the information that in this particular case, we should not expect their removal to be long-lasting, and you presented it in a tactful and polite manner, along with supporting facts. Oldmanbreadboard, in addition to your interesting name (Do you often bake bread?), you have given us an amusing saying that I had never heard before. Really funny in a weird way. However, I do think that the context suggests that the complaining people are being executed, and not attached to a wall as decorations, right?___________________________________________________________I know this is off topic, so, people not interested in how languages change, please skip the following. In de...see more »Thanks for the nice ible! Going to try it!KimkaschiIler: Thanks. I don't care what the things are called, but I appreciated the information that in this particular case, we should not expect their removal to be long-lasting, and you presented it in a tactful and polite manner, along with supporting facts. Oldmanbreadboard, in addition to your interesting name (Do you often bake bread?), you have given us an amusing saying that I had never heard before. Really funny in a weird way. However, I do think that the context suggests that the complaining people are being executed, and not attached to a wall as decorations, right?___________________________________________________________I know this is off topic, so, people not interested in how languages change, please skip the following. In defense of Shawnda and English grammar, and more for Luapy than for the bread maker: There are two verbs that have different past tenses and past participles from each other, depending on the meaning.(1) hang - hung - hung: "I used some special hardware to hang the new picture; but after I had hung it on the living room wall, my wife insisted that I move it, leaving a nail hole where it had been.(2) hang (as in "stringing someone up") "In the old days, even petty thieves were sometimes hanged." "The judge sentenced the murderer "to be hanged by the neck until dead."It is the use of "hung" in Oldmanbreadboard's comment that would not make sense.There is a similar problem with lie/lay/lain (as when resting on a bed) and lay/laid/laid (as when putting an object down somewhere). When enough people keep using a verb incorrectly, eventually that leads to a big change in English grammar, and the new usage becomes the correct one. So very likely the day will come when Luapy is right. But not yet. Meanwhile, we are in for a period of time during which purists complain about mistakes and the rest of us may sometimes resent being corrected for things we have been saying all our lives. It was ever thus!

    Wonderful, Joseph; thanks for the laugh. I hate spell check! Possible mistakes being underlined in red, OK. Automatic changes to some weird wrong word, NOT. But sometimes, if we catch them soon enough, spell check's errors are really amusing. No doubt, spell check was also the culprit in Namora's sentence "The actual purpose for these fine hares is to keep the pore clean by moving around." I presume that the hares have been microsized, and perhaps their fluffy tails and jumping ability are what help clean one's pores. Where can I buy some?

    Nice ible! KimkaschiIler: Thanks. I don't care what the things are called, but it was valuable information that in this particular case, we should not expect their removal to be long-lasting, and you presented it in a tactful and polite manner, along with supporting facts.Oldmanbreadboard, in addition to your interesting name (Do you often bake bread?), you have given us an amusing saying that I had never heard before. Really funny in a weird way. However, I do think that the context suggests that the complaining people are being executed, and not attached to a wall as decorations, right?___________________________________________________________I know this is off topic, so, people not interested in how languages change, please skip the following. In defense of Shawnda and English gramm...see more »Nice ible! KimkaschiIler: Thanks. I don't care what the things are called, but it was valuable information that in this particular case, we should not expect their removal to be long-lasting, and you presented it in a tactful and polite manner, along with supporting facts.Oldmanbreadboard, in addition to your interesting name (Do you often bake bread?), you have given us an amusing saying that I had never heard before. Really funny in a weird way. However, I do think that the context suggests that the complaining people are being executed, and not attached to a wall as decorations, right?___________________________________________________________I know this is off topic, so, people not interested in how languages change, please skip the following. In defense of Shawnda and English grammar, and more for Luapy than for the bread maker: There are two verbs that have different past and past participles from each other, depending on the meaning.(1) hang - hung - hung: "I used some special hardware to hang the new picture; but after I had hung it on the living room wall, my wife insisted that I move it, leaving a nail hole where it had been.(2) hang (as in "stringing someone up") "In the old days, even petty thieves were sometimes hanged." "The judge sentenced the murderer "to be hanged by the neck until dead."It is the use of "hung" in Oldmanbreadboard's comment that would not make sense.There is a similar problem with lie/lay/lain (as when resting on a bed) and lay/laid/laid (as when putting an object down somewhere). When enough people keep using a verb incorrectly, eventually that leads to a big change in English grammar, so no doubt the day will come when Luapy's criticism will ring true. But not yet.Meanwhile, we are in for a period of time during which purists complain about mistakes and the rest of us may sometimes resent being corrected for things we have been saying all our lives.

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  • Catley followed solobo4 months ago
  • Catley commented on ReeseLloyd's instructable Magnetic Spice Rack4 months ago
    Magnetic Spice Rack

    This is about garlic salt, but might work for garlic powder, as well. I had so much trouble with clumping that finally I put the container in the freezer, and now it goes for a year or more and is always quite shakable. I realize that doing so would mean it couldn't be used in the fridge door "rack," but might be worth it to save money on having to replace it frequently.

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  • Catley commented on Penolopy Bulnick's instructable 37+ Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks4 months ago
    37+ Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks

    Thanks for making me laugh!

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  • Catley commented on Penolopy Bulnick's instructable 37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks4 months ago
    37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks

    Yeah, Penolopy. I couldn't help wondering where you got so many beautiful socks for your pictures. Confess! Didn't some non-orphan, no-holey ones make it into them? ;_) Perfectly understandable, because they have much more appeal than if they looked like MY family's old socks!

    Heh! I'm from New England, and I had never heard of a hacky sack, either!

    Sinius.pi: Exactly what my husband and I tell each other as we resist the official urgings here in CA to redo all our windows with double panes and save energy for both air-conditioning and heating. Just the other day, a neighbor had all their windows replaced and told me there was a world of difference in airtightness. I suppose we could follow suit and still just open a window when we wanted, but I kind of LIKE the idea that the air gets refreshed even when we don't do that. 'Course, living where we do, temps are not too extreme in any case.

    The same thought occurred to me, kirnex, although 'way below the "bemused and confounded" level. More like, semiconsciously (the way I often operate nowadays in my old age): "Hey, now, she's using two socks sometimes!" and then immediately realizing that using "lonely" in the title was a clever hook to catch attention. And in the title picture, she DID just write "Unusual uses for (no "lonely") socks." If it was terribly disappointing to find that you would have to use two for some of the suggestions, you have my sympathy. :>) (Would like to make that a wide toothy grin, but I'm not too good with emoticons.) The thought occurs that using two would be a good excuse for getting rid of any gift socks that you hate: "Oh, aunty! I'm...see more »The same thought occurred to me, kirnex, although 'way below the "bemused and confounded" level. More like, semiconsciously (the way I often operate nowadays in my old age): "Hey, now, she's using two socks sometimes!" and then immediately realizing that using "lonely" in the title was a clever hook to catch attention. And in the title picture, she DID just write "Unusual uses for (no "lonely") socks." If it was terribly disappointing to find that you would have to use two for some of the suggestions, you have my sympathy. :>) (Would like to make that a wide toothy grin, but I'm not too good with emoticons.) The thought occurs that using two would be a good excuse for getting rid of any gift socks that you hate: "Oh, aunty! I'm sooo sorry! I DID love the socks you sent, but don't you think they are much better in this ___(whatever you make), where I can look at them more often?" HEY! this means that I just thought of another new hack for using socks!!

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  • Catley commented on Penolopy Bulnick's instructable 37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks4 months ago
    37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks

    Yup, a light bulb would be just about the size and shape of my grandmother's sock-darning tool. If I ever have to darn a sock again--which I hope I won't have to--I'll remember that.

    I had a bit of fun telling my elderly and very conservative husband who always wears either white sports socks or dark thin socks, about this instructable and asking him with a straight face to start buying colorful striped socks (I mentioned red blue and yellow) so they would make a prettier phone cover, draught preventers, arm coverings, and so forth. As I have always been "into" crafts, he believed me for a few minutes until I burst out laughing. Actually, as Penolopy says below, I wouldn't mind buying socks for certain special things. I love to have colorful things around me.

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  • Catley commented on Penolopy Bulnick's instructable 37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks4 months ago
    37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks

    I have reached the age where I can do things like that UNintentionally! When nylon stockings are involved (knee-highs), it isn't too noticeable, but occasionally I find myself removing non-matching earrings at night. I keep them sorted with similar colors in a box partitioned in small sections and think I have grabbed a pair, but...The first time it happened, I mentioned it the next day to the friend I had been with, and she said, "Oh, I just thought you were starting a new fashion."

    Or you could write "those darned orphaned socks", and it would still carry both meanings! heh hehI used to have an old black-painted wooden thing shaped like a spindle that was the tool my grandmother used inside the socks she darned. Probably nowadays no one would recognize what it was for.

    I am reading these comments before reading the list of uses for the socks, which I am going to download and keep for frequent reference, so perhaps shoulder pads have been mentioned. But I have to say here that you, Dandytroopermagoo, have given me a hint for one of the most useful things I can do with old socks: turn them into shoulder pads! I make most of my own clothes and bought shoulder pads tend to be slippery and thin, as well as annoyingly expensive, yet quite a nuisance to make for myself. With socks, a bit of stuffing, and a few stitches, voila!

    "Wondering how many socks you have at home."There ought to be a button to click here to show laughter!

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  • Catley commented on ShakeTheFuture's instructable 8 Pool Noodle Life Hacks & Diy's4 months ago
    8 Pool Noodle Life Hacks & Diy's

    What wonderful ideas! The first ones I use will be to tie together the sticks and dowels in our garage, and I will keep some pieces of noodle to protect glass bottles when I go shopping. Always worry about glass things hitting and breaking each other and making a real mess!

    Hey, great idea! How do you attach the noodle to the bucket? It looks very comfortable. I notice you have also attached a roll of the biodegradable bags to the pail--or is that a roll of toilet paper? Either way, very nice!

    Use like a hose! That is another great idea.

    Really, really great idea for a present!

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  • Catley commented on Penolopy Bulnick's instructable Unusual Uses for Mouthwash4 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Mouthwash

    Do you spray around in the air, or must you spray it on yourself?

    Wow, Archer65, you just hit on something I discovered many, many years ago. I put milkweed milk on a wart on the side of my hand and it went away. Seeing is believing, and I certainly would not consider using milkweed milk to get rid of warts to be a myth. Neither do I believe--in the face of Robin's experience--that B1 is not helpful in avoiding mosquito bites, though I am willing to consider that some people may have a body chemistry that makes it less likely than for others. Now I am living in hot So. CA and am wishing I knew some other plant with "milk" that might do the same thing for me. For instance, my fig trees also have milky sap, so I wonder... And then there is the sap from the euphorbia succulents that I raise, but many of them have sap that can hurt your eyes or ...see more »Wow, Archer65, you just hit on something I discovered many, many years ago. I put milkweed milk on a wart on the side of my hand and it went away. Seeing is believing, and I certainly would not consider using milkweed milk to get rid of warts to be a myth. Neither do I believe--in the face of Robin's experience--that B1 is not helpful in avoiding mosquito bites, though I am willing to consider that some people may have a body chemistry that makes it less likely than for others. Now I am living in hot So. CA and am wishing I knew some other plant with "milk" that might do the same thing for me. For instance, my fig trees also have milky sap, so I wonder... And then there is the sap from the euphorbia succulents that I raise, but many of them have sap that can hurt your eyes or cause a rash, so perhaps it would not be too smart to try their sap on my warts. If you get euphorbia sap in your eyes, even a teensy amount left after washing your hands, it has been my experience that you can have some very unpleasant effects if it gets into your eyes. Then again, not all euphorbias are the same, but the last I searched (not recently) no one seems to have made a definitive list of which are dangerous and which not. Anyone who raises euphorbias, take care!

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