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  • Chimonger commented on KarenK116's instructable PVC Pipe Rain Stick2 weeks ago
    PVC Pipe Rain Stick

    LOL! That is wonderful story! Love it! I'd made a rainstick for my Dad, years ago. He was very tall and imposing stature; carried it to the banking work in San Francisco one day. Of course, people were curious. On break, he took it to the coffee shop nearby, that had 20' tall walls of windows on 2 sides...so great view of skies. One co-worker insisted on trying it, despite Dad warning him that he'd left his umbrella or rain coat at work, so would get wet if he shook it the wrong way.... The guy shook it a little, and a few huge rain drops started splotching the huge windows, out of a nearly clear sky. He shook it some more, and rain increased to dripping down the windows. Shook it again, and it started a downpour. Needless to say, some very impressed, saucer-eyed co-worke...

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    LOL! That is wonderful story! Love it! I'd made a rainstick for my Dad, years ago. He was very tall and imposing stature; carried it to the banking work in San Francisco one day. Of course, people were curious. On break, he took it to the coffee shop nearby, that had 20' tall walls of windows on 2 sides...so great view of skies. One co-worker insisted on trying it, despite Dad warning him that he'd left his umbrella or rain coat at work, so would get wet if he shook it the wrong way.... The guy shook it a little, and a few huge rain drops started splotching the huge windows, out of a nearly clear sky. He shook it some more, and rain increased to dripping down the windows. Shook it again, and it started a downpour. Needless to say, some very impressed, saucer-eyed co-workers then wondered what kind of man my Dad really was...or was it the tool, and was it because of it's maker? My rainsticks also kept the neighborhood kids impressed...rain would suddenly show up when they were used...might not always be much, but some. Always works better with a good story to go with it. Ambiance.

    Wow! Great instructable! I've made rainsticks of PVC too...but never did the wood-tone coloring. I used a Dremel tool, to carve mystical symbols, colored using art paints and a wood burning tool. Used thin, flat-head nails set into the drilled holes in the PVC, held in place with a little melted PVC shoved over them. Otherwise, left them white colored. I used regular PVC end caps....but like that large cork much better....where do you get corks that big? If you want to make it look like there's irregularities in the sides, lumps and bumps, for instance, you might try melting extra PVC onto the pipe, to look like branch stubs. A wood-burning tool and a Dremel tool, works PVC very nicely; those can actually help stick parts together. PVC glues or such, might help add some i...

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    Wow! Great instructable! I've made rainsticks of PVC too...but never did the wood-tone coloring. I used a Dremel tool, to carve mystical symbols, colored using art paints and a wood burning tool. Used thin, flat-head nails set into the drilled holes in the PVC, held in place with a little melted PVC shoved over them. Otherwise, left them white colored. I used regular PVC end caps....but like that large cork much better....where do you get corks that big? If you want to make it look like there's irregularities in the sides, lumps and bumps, for instance, you might try melting extra PVC onto the pipe, to look like branch stubs. A wood-burning tool and a Dremel tool, works PVC very nicely; those can actually help stick parts together. PVC glues or such, might help add some irregularities to the surface, too....just gotta make sure they are stuck-on really well, and blended-in with the pipe, so they don't chip-off during use.

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  • Chimonger commented on stevemoseley's instructable 10 Degree Kitchen Drawer Fix3 months ago
    10 Degree Kitchen Drawer Fix

    Ah! The things one fails to consider, in these kinds of situations! Very good to know! Thanks!

    Very excellent solution to remedy one of cabinet makers worst designs! Nice to find a solution that can be implemented without removing countertop. So many corner base cabinets have become use-nightmares! Did you have to do an angle reconstruction for the drawer next to the stove, too? It was hard to tell from your pictures, whether that drawer got blocked by the handle on the 1st prefabricated drawer. The only better solution I can think of, would be to combine both drawers into a wider unit, and V-front the drawer, so it rolls out from the corner. Larger drawers, imho, are more functional, though, IDK if an inverted V-front would be easier to grapple with, as it'd be hard to figure out how to mount a drawer-pull.

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  • Chimonger commented on F4916's instructable How to Desalinate Seawater5 months ago
    How to Desalinate Seawater

    It would be nice if we still had clean rain. But we don't...almost anywhere in the world now, it's contaminated by various heavy metal particles, as well as chemicals, one way or another.During distilling, be it solar or boiler method, much of the particles, germs, and chemicals remain in the cooker. BUT...there are still some hazardous chemical residues of certain kinds, that are small enough, light enough, and bond with water well enough, that they travel along with the steam or condensate, into the collection bottles.Therefore, it's important to, at the very least, use an activated charcoal filter on the distilled water, to make it fit for potable use.

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  • Build Yourself a Portable Home - a Mongolian Yurt

    A well-engineered yurt can withstand much higher winds...we have a Nesting Birds [Now Rainier Tents] 30' yurt, on a site that annually can have episodes of 100+ mph sustained gusts! The hard part is rain...it's in the Pacific NW, where there is plenty of humidity and rain...that's hard on the canvas and the vinyl roof. We've stocked a small collection of Boat and sail maintenance items, like the white Dacron tape, for mending any hole or tear in the roof cover or sides.

    Only on a Small yurt...maybe 10' diameter or smaller.. PVC is flexible. And, can crack. A 1" PVC pipe lattice might do OK for a time, but not rafters...PVC pipe sags..even on the smaller diameter. Connections might be better made using thin rope....rope is softer than metal, therefore less likely to wear at the holes, and reduce splits.

    Very nicely done! I liked the outer-rafter-end support, better than most commercially made yurt rafter supports...those usually only support half the rafter end; yours supports the whole rafter end...much better. A bit concerned about how stable the rafter center supports might split under stress...But that's a nice, easy assembly insertion method...could reinforce-wrap those ends, to prevent splitting. Use a metal strap-wrap for that end, maybe.

    Sure can! Just make sure to use proper procedure for running the exhaust flue. Proper rocket stoves can use a smaller diameter flue...which works better in tents, too. Be sure to have intake air, too...though, tents are generally plenty ventilated. The smoke-hole cover is generally used to control how much intake air can flow upwards to/thru that hole...convection ventilation.

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  • Chimonger commented on F4916's instructable How to Desalinate Seawater5 months ago
    How to Desalinate Seawater

    If one leaves the lid off, the contents cannot heat up. If the closed bottle is not left in the sun long enough, of course it won't get hot enough. But, IF the bottle is closed, And in the sun long enough, it cooks the little beasties. ....Same reason you don't leave a pet or child in a car on a sunny day [some places, even in winter!], because the interior gets too hot to live. ....Same reason greenhouses get warm and keep warm, if in the sun...and need vented on sunny days, to avoid killing the plants inside from over-heating [depending on greenhouse and other weather conditions].

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  • Chimonger commented on luxOthebot's instructable LuxO's Open Joinery 32" Smart Mirror5 months ago
    LuxO's Open Joinery 32" Smart Mirror

    If the unit is smart TV, it usually now has that labeled on it's frame for all to see. I was given to understand, that all TV's and monitors which are labeled 'smart', have internal cameras for monitoring the room the unit's in. Very "big Brother", that. But IDK how to tap into using those for one's own purposes, nor how to prevent them being used by Big Brother...if that's real...though with all the other junk HmlndScrty has been doing, wouldn't be a bit surprised. It'd have to be some kind of high resolution, as well as sound capturing functions.

    Why mount the TV perpendicular to it's usual orientation? Doesn't that mess with "widescreen" viewing? Or was mounting it this way, to conceal better, that it's a TV? Very nice woodwork!

    It's a Smart TV. TV's labeled "smart", are capable of surveilling the room they're in. There's a camera in them already, as I understand. ....Oh..but you're talking about a webcam...right? Many TV's have multiple USB plugs; just plug one in? Can one plug into the Rasberry Pi?

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  • Chimonger commented on F4916's instructable How to Desalinate Seawater5 months ago
    How to Desalinate Seawater

    NO! Galvanizing chemicals out-gas when heated! You'd be better off using a black plastic bucket. Or even a hole in the ground with the cup and weighted plastic. OR filtering the condensate using a small section of woody branch of a non-toxic tree to drip-filter it through.

    In the demos I've watched, they demo it on one bush [careful what kind of bush!], but specify that to get enough water per day, one would need several bushes bagged in clear plastic, draining to a cup.As for filtering: Many kinds of wood can act as filters, due to the longitudinal fibers in the small branches. A piece about 1/2" to 3/4" diameter x about 4" long, plugged into a soda bottle full of nasty water, can get it filtered over several hours. This method could be used if one lacks better filters and cannot boil the condensate. Make sure the wood used, is the right kind and non-toxic.Staying safe, means planning ahead to get one's basic needs met.

    Galvanizing out-gasses when heated. It outgassed into certain fluids [hence, don't put those in your mouth!].

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  • Chimonger commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for Zip Ties5 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Zip Ties

    We've used zip-ties in all sorts of unconventional ways. Zipties + screw eyes, make a great pair, too....at present, we have temporary "rafters" made of 1x2's, supporting shade cloths over patio...zipties hole shades onto the support beam to prevent them blowing away, and, zip ties hold up the 1x2's at the eves and at the beam. They're great for temp holing parts together, coding items for storage, bundling droopy cords, holding parts to parts...such as various extra parts onto wire storage racks. Cat toys [make them too big to swallow or choke on]. Holding costume parts together; make costumes from zip ties and etc. hardware. Crafts. I've even figured out many years ago, how to reuse zip ties, by inserting a thin blade or pin, into the catch to release it...pretty tricky...

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    We've used zip-ties in all sorts of unconventional ways. Zipties + screw eyes, make a great pair, too....at present, we have temporary "rafters" made of 1x2's, supporting shade cloths over patio...zipties hole shades onto the support beam to prevent them blowing away, and, zip ties hold up the 1x2's at the eves and at the beam. They're great for temp holing parts together, coding items for storage, bundling droopy cords, holding parts to parts...such as various extra parts onto wire storage racks. Cat toys [make them too big to swallow or choke on]. Holding costume parts together; make costumes from zip ties and etc. hardware. Crafts. I've even figured out many years ago, how to reuse zip ties, by inserting a thin blade or pin, into the catch to release it...pretty tricky....and sometimes, it ruins the catch's ability to stay 'tied', after that. Have used these in all the ways described, except the traction for bike tire and shoes--that's pretty cool!

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  • Inexpensive Garage Lights From LED Strips

    This really looks very cool! But, complicated to get up there to wire it all, many power supplies.....and, unsure how it is less costly [counting time, effort, materials, AND power bill to support it?] ....than simply using ready-made shop lights, with LED bulbs already in them? What happens when the LED strips stuck to the rafter, dims, yellows, or loses LED function [as numerous types of our rope, strip etc. LED's have]? Costco carries Feit 4' LED linkable shop lights, at $60 each. Plug'n'play. https://www.costco.com/Feit-Electric-4’-Linkable-LED-Shop-Light-with-Pull-Chain%2c-2-pack.product.100284402.html ; Home Depot carries a list of various sizes and configurations of LED shop lights, also plug'n'play, in a range of prices. Easy to remove and replace. LED "bu...

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    This really looks very cool! But, complicated to get up there to wire it all, many power supplies.....and, unsure how it is less costly [counting time, effort, materials, AND power bill to support it?] ....than simply using ready-made shop lights, with LED bulbs already in them? What happens when the LED strips stuck to the rafter, dims, yellows, or loses LED function [as numerous types of our rope, strip etc. LED's have]? Costco carries Feit 4' LED linkable shop lights, at $60 each. Plug'n'play. https://www.costco.com/Feit-Electric-4’-Linkable-LED-Shop-Light-with-Pull-Chain%2c-2-pack.product.100284402.html ; Home Depot carries a list of various sizes and configurations of LED shop lights, also plug'n'play, in a range of prices. Easy to remove and replace. LED "bulbs' configured to replace long fluorescent bulbs, even easier to replace [although, not all of those are very good quality, and can devolve into shutting off randomly]. For the look of professional, clean-lines, with no fixture to dust off, the LED strips attached under 2x rafters or trusses, could have a beneficial edge. I'd suggest taking advantage of those LED strips ability to choose colors, to make some strips run various colors, like reds and yellows, to help reduce eye fatigue from the blue wavelengths in the cool whites. Also, you might want to get an EMF/RF meter, to take readings on what kinds of electro-smog the LED lights and associated equipment are emitting, as those can be a health hazard, if one spends too much time exposed to them. Some folks use metal mesh over a fixture, to prevent fixtures emitting high levels of EMF/RF into a living/working space [kinda like little Faraday cages around fixtures, must be grounded].

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  • Green Solar Powered Water Barrel Version 2

    This is very cool! BUT...I'd avoid using garden hoses...those are loaded with toxic chemicals that outgas into the water going through them. We opt for the white RV potable water hoses, to avoid most of that. We use the white RV potable water hoses to water our food gardens, to avoid adding chemicals to the foods growing. Alt., could use PEX tubing, which is resistant to freeze damage, and, far lower outgassing of nasty chemicals, than even PVC pipe.

    Could maybe couple a simple solar water distiller onto this, to do the brunt of water purification. Could use a sand filter to remove most of the contaminants.

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  • Chimonger commented on jessyratfink's instructable Unusual Uses for Coconut Oil6 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Coconut Oil

    I am more than a little bit concerned about using "refined" coconut oil. Coconut oil is processed at too -high heat anyhow.....despite makers' claims to "cold-process" it. Often, one can see scorched oil at the bottoms of clear containers......which means it was NOT "cold processed". AND which means, there's a probability some of the oil changed into hydrogenated form......bad for health. Hydrogenated is one reason coconut oil was considered unhealthy years ago. AND...I refuse to buy Spectrum Naturals products, after 2 years of them refusing to listen to my communications, nor address multiple batches of coconut oil [supposedly cold pressed, organic, etc.].... which smelled like burnt plastic, and were scorched on the bottom portions of the jars....the co...

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    I am more than a little bit concerned about using "refined" coconut oil. Coconut oil is processed at too -high heat anyhow.....despite makers' claims to "cold-process" it. Often, one can see scorched oil at the bottoms of clear containers......which means it was NOT "cold processed". AND which means, there's a probability some of the oil changed into hydrogenated form......bad for health. Hydrogenated is one reason coconut oil was considered unhealthy years ago. AND...I refuse to buy Spectrum Naturals products, after 2 years of them refusing to listen to my communications, nor address multiple batches of coconut oil [supposedly cold pressed, organic, etc.].... which smelled like burnt plastic, and were scorched on the bottom portions of the jars....the company rep really didn't listen to what I was saying. I have more than a few clues about production lines, and they were in dire need of doing maintenance on line equipment! The guy sent me a coupon for more of it....NOT happening. Since they were so cavalier about that, what else were they too cavalier about? They USED to be a very reputable company, that made very good quality oils....I don't believe they do anymore. I look for other brands, that actually use organic and actually cold-pressed their oils.

    I am more than a little bit concerned about using "refined" coconut oil. Coconut oil is processed at too -high heat anyhow.....despite makers' claims to "cold-process" it. Often, one can see scorched oil at the bottoms of clear containers......which means it was NOT "cold processed". AND which means, there's a probability some of the oil changed into hydrogenated form......bad for health. Hydrogenated is one reason coconut oil was considered unhealthy years ago.

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  • Chimonger commented on motherearthmark's instructable MINI WOOD-FIRED EARTH OVEN!6 months ago
    MINI WOOD-FIRED EARTH OVEN!

    Family-size cob ovens, often have a chimney up the back, to allow redirecting smoke away from the cooking area. Building a roof over it is a great idea, then redirect the smoke up and away using a chimney pipe, or, more cob to construct that [as long as it's protected by a roof]. If you want to get more elaborate, can build a warming bench off the side, run chimney pipe through that then up to vent, and heat will also warm that bench, as well as your oven.... Good clean dirty fun, cob! Making masonry mass of a cob oven and warming bench, can keep a cabin [and those inside] warm in winter. Masonry mass stoves are much more thrifty on fuel, than regular heaters or woodstoves.

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  • Plastic Smithing: How to Make Your Own HDPE Plastic Anything (DIY Plastic Lumber)

    Pretty cool! Someone some years ago, learned that by mixing different plastics together and form bricks, the resulting bricks were stronger than regular bricks...something about cross-linking polymers. Your donut blocks could be interesting as stacked on rods, maybe chicken wire on both sides then plastering inside and outside of the "wall". Or make a mold that could do a double-donut [an "8"], do the blocks could be interlocked on rebars.

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  • Chimonger commented on amalkhan's instructable How to Distill Water7 months ago
    How to Distill Water

    This is a fun demonstration, but it's using energy not only to boil the water, but also to make the ice. OTH, if one has snow or ice nature makes, that might be more energy efficient. One can more easily use a common pressure cooker as a distiller, by connecting a length of loosely coiled copper tubing to the steam escape spigot on the lid. Then if one wants to enhance the condensation, can place the coiled tubing in a bowl of ice water, mid-length to where the tubing needs to drip into a container. We had one in the school's chem lab, which routed the tubing a few feet straight up above the cooker, then down-turned to make it's loops...perhaps about 10' or more of tubing directed to a 5-gal bottle to collect it. The copper tubing was connected to the steam escape valve using bra...

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    This is a fun demonstration, but it's using energy not only to boil the water, but also to make the ice. OTH, if one has snow or ice nature makes, that might be more energy efficient. One can more easily use a common pressure cooker as a distiller, by connecting a length of loosely coiled copper tubing to the steam escape spigot on the lid. Then if one wants to enhance the condensation, can place the coiled tubing in a bowl of ice water, mid-length to where the tubing needs to drip into a container. We had one in the school's chem lab, which routed the tubing a few feet straight up above the cooker, then down-turned to make it's loops...perhaps about 10' or more of tubing directed to a 5-gal bottle to collect it. The copper tubing was connected to the steam escape valve using brass plumbing pressure fittings. Others have used medical-grade rubber hose to connect the pan lid spigot to the tubing cheap and easy. IF one collects methane from a compost pile in a container, that will stink to burn, though I understand that by placing fine steel wool packed into the pipe directing it to the appliance burning the gas, will remove most of the stench from the methane. That would be some decent recycle of naturally occurring fuel to make the distilled water.

    There are SO many manmade chemicals currently in most water sources; many become gaseous when heated, ending up in the otherwise distilled water. That is why it's necessary to use a carbon post-filter to get really clean distilled water. I'm not even sure that would remove things like some forms of Fluoride...Fl takes special filters to remove.

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  • Chimonger commented on StephanP1's instructable A Boat From a Single 2x47 months ago
    A Boat From a Single 2x4

    Cute! Of course it needs more than the 2x4 to properly finish it....but hey...outriggers? I've seen little boats kinda this shape, being used just fine. Maybe by kid fishing in the farm pond...keep in mind that Howard Hughes made, and flew, his Spruce Goose, _one time_, to prove it could.

    Cute! Of course it needs more than the 2x4 to properly finish it....but hey...outriggers? I've seen little boats kinda this shape, being used just fine. Maybe by kid fishing in the farm pond...

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  • Chimonger commented on makendo's instructable Secret Door Bookcase7 months ago
    Secret Door Bookcase

    VERY nicely done, and impressive! Thank you for sharing!

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  • Chimonger commented on Kreat0r's instructable A Best Kept Secret to Losing Weight7 months ago
    A Best Kept Secret to Losing Weight

    If one considers what hunter-gatherers probably had to do, they likely did something like intermittent fasting, because instead of eating grains, or getting up and eating breakfast and maybe lunch, they had to hunt/gather for proteins and produce. Physical work + fasting = far less obesity. They didn't eat much simple sugars; their carbs came with lots of fiber already in them. Makes sense. But sometimes, if there is metabolic imbalance, one might need to try both restricting calories, using a Paleo or ketogenic diet, And/Or, the other end of the spectrum, certain types of Raw Vegan diets, to get the metabolic imbalance re-booted, and calories starting to burn properly, instead of being stored.

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  • Chimonger commented on Natalina's instructable Build a Soundproof Wall7 months ago
    Build a Soundproof Wall

    I learned long ago, that whatever one does to form an irregular surface, can reduce sounds bouncing off hard surfaces. The more irregularities there are, the better. Common cardboard egg cartons [the part the eggs sit in] provide a wonderfully irregular surface, which will help reduce sound waves bounding off otherwise flat walls. Others use foam slabs, similar to what's on old speaker fronts, but thicker. I imagine that poking a small hole into a drywalled wall, and squirting foam into the wall bays, would do this too. In our experience using various Great Stuff foam in a can products, those usually go into a wall-bay quite irregularly. They do expand [depending on which one, and conditions], but retain a kind of snake-like fold-over irregularity which, in addition to all...

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    I learned long ago, that whatever one does to form an irregular surface, can reduce sounds bouncing off hard surfaces. The more irregularities there are, the better. Common cardboard egg cartons [the part the eggs sit in] provide a wonderfully irregular surface, which will help reduce sound waves bounding off otherwise flat walls. Others use foam slabs, similar to what's on old speaker fronts, but thicker. I imagine that poking a small hole into a drywalled wall, and squirting foam into the wall bays, would do this too. In our experience using various Great Stuff foam in a can products, those usually go into a wall-bay quite irregularly. They do expand [depending on which one, and conditions], but retain a kind of snake-like fold-over irregularity which, in addition to all the air bubbles in the foam itself, those irregular folds also help reduce sound transmission through walls. OR, could use the 2" thick foam panels, score the back and front surfaces to make irregular surface, and bed them into the walls using Great Stuff spray foam. There are commercially made sound-proofing foam panels with designed-in ribs or other irregular surfaces, which can be mounted on walls, ceilings, etc., to reduce sound transmissions. Some use decorative quilted fabrics to similarly "tune" a room. Could find and recycle foam shipping panels for this, too.

    Cardboard makes good sound-proofing, too [very do-able, and can find it for free]. But there might be some things needed to keep that safe. Mold, Bugs and fire LOVE cardboard! All three issues, can be vastly reduced, by making a solution of approximately: 1 part Borax + 1 or 2 parts water. Slather that onto all sides of each layer of cardboard, _let dry thoroughly_. Then glue together layers of cardboard to the desired thickness of panel. Then cover the open ends of corrugation using caulk, glue, etc. to prevent critters crawling into the structure to find homes. We covered our "furniture" using contact paper to look nicer than cardboard. Borax captured and left undisturbed, is pretty safe/non-toxic, and is mold, bugs and fire deterrent. The panels can be c...

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    Cardboard makes good sound-proofing, too [very do-able, and can find it for free]. But there might be some things needed to keep that safe. Mold, Bugs and fire LOVE cardboard! All three issues, can be vastly reduced, by making a solution of approximately: 1 part Borax + 1 or 2 parts water. Slather that onto all sides of each layer of cardboard, _let dry thoroughly_. Then glue together layers of cardboard to the desired thickness of panel. Then cover the open ends of corrugation using caulk, glue, etc. to prevent critters crawling into the structure to find homes. We covered our "furniture" using contact paper to look nicer than cardboard. Borax captured and left undisturbed, is pretty safe/non-toxic, and is mold, bugs and fire deterrent. The panels can be covered with whatever covering one likes, so they don't look like stacks of cardboard, and make cleaning easy. I made a bed, clothes storage, seating, for one of our kids, using various stacks and configurations of cardboard. ALSO made 2"+ thick panels to use on the wall that was adjoined to a neighbor's apartment. It's great for reducing sounds, and once properly formed/configured, is very durable....those pieces lasted at least 10 years, and we really had to work hard to destroy it, when the time came. No bugs in it, ever. We did a simple flammability test on ours, like if a candle tipped over on it, or someone tried to use a lighter on it, and had a very very hard time getting it to sustain a flame; it extinguished itself pretty fast.

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