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  • ClaudioP34 commented on techydiy's instructable Modern Led Infinity Mirror Table Lamp1 week ago
    Modern Led Infinity Mirror Table Lamp

    Nice, clean, simple and impressive!

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  • ClaudioP34 commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy No Knead Bread2 months ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    It tasted great! It is already finished.But as I said before, it is not the first time I baked this kind of bread, and my recipe has the same proportion between the ingredients as yours, just I usually bake on the base of 500g flour instead of 360g.

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  • ClaudioP34 made the instructable Easy No Knead Bread2 months ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    This is my last attempt. Same quantities as Matt's recipe (usually a bake a recipe based on 500g flour).

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  • ClaudioP34 commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy No Knead Bread3 months ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    Yes, breads from Umbria (the bread of Terni is a famous one), in the south part of Tuscany, and in general the central part of Italy that was under the Kingdom of the Church before the unification of Italy are without salt. That is because there was a tax on the salt, and the salt was produced only in few saltworks near the sea (there are not salt mines in central Italy). So, since the salt was a very expensive good, in the towns far from the sea it was used only for cured ham and "salumi", and not, or just a pinch, for the bread. While in the city of Rome and in the area south of Rome (the Roman Castles, where the pope had the summer palace, and still have) the tax was not applied, so the bread baked in Rome and in the area of the Castles is traditionally with salt (there wer...see more »Yes, breads from Umbria (the bread of Terni is a famous one), in the south part of Tuscany, and in general the central part of Italy that was under the Kingdom of the Church before the unification of Italy are without salt. That is because there was a tax on the salt, and the salt was produced only in few saltworks near the sea (there are not salt mines in central Italy). So, since the salt was a very expensive good, in the towns far from the sea it was used only for cured ham and "salumi", and not, or just a pinch, for the bread. While in the city of Rome and in the area south of Rome (the Roman Castles, where the pope had the summer palace, and still have) the tax was not applied, so the bread baked in Rome and in the area of the Castles is traditionally with salt (there were two saltworks near Rome, under the direct control of the pope).In Tuscany too, there were few saltworks and the salt was mainly imported, so it was even more expensive.South of Rome, Naples and south of Italy were under the Kingdom of Sicily, and there was not such a tax, plus there were many saltworks, so the salt was much cheaper and the bread was made with more salt.

    I did not tried by myself, but the friend that gave me the recipe says that everithing that can be covered works. He even uses a piece aluminium foil to cover a deep pan and says it works well.Matt, your dutch oven is much more expensive than in Europe! Even in Italy, Le Creuset is an expensive brand but not SO expensive! But the quality is awesome (it will last for a lifetime).

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  • Amazing Homemade Pizza Dough

    Home ovens don't go hotter, mine reach 250°C, that is a bit less than 500 °.Flipping the dough in the air is mainly for show :-) I heard that flipping give a best "texture" to the Naples-stile pizza, but all the best pizza restaurants I tried in Italy are not flipping the dough in the air.If you are going to visit Italy, let me know!

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  • Amazing Homemade Pizza Dough

    As I promised you, I checked your pizza dough recipe. The ingredients are right but I think 1 h for rising is not enough. I use about 3-4 g of yeast for 500 g of flour, do the dough like you do until step 7, then I let it rise for about 20 hours (I prepare the dough the day before). If you reduce the amount of yeast, you can leave the dough rising longer. The wife of a friend of mine manage to reach 48 h. Or a bit more yeast, and you can prepare the dough in the morning. But do not let it rise less than 6 hours, 1 hour is not enough.Then, about 1 or 2 h before cooking, I take out the dough and cut it into equal parts, then roll them again to form balls, and let the balls of dough sitting for 1-2 h.Better avoiding the rolling pin (the pin makes the bubbles of gas escaping from the dough)...see more »As I promised you, I checked your pizza dough recipe. The ingredients are right but I think 1 h for rising is not enough. I use about 3-4 g of yeast for 500 g of flour, do the dough like you do until step 7, then I let it rise for about 20 hours (I prepare the dough the day before). If you reduce the amount of yeast, you can leave the dough rising longer. The wife of a friend of mine manage to reach 48 h. Or a bit more yeast, and you can prepare the dough in the morning. But do not let it rise less than 6 hours, 1 hour is not enough.Then, about 1 or 2 h before cooking, I take out the dough and cut it into equal parts, then roll them again to form balls, and let the balls of dough sitting for 1-2 h.Better avoiding the rolling pin (the pin makes the bubbles of gas escaping from the dough), just shape the pizza using your hands and applying few pressure: there is not a real need to flip it into the air!The oven must be pre-heated at max power (500 degrees F is good!)A trick: try adding the cheese after the pizza has been in the oven for some minutes. But maybe the American pizza cheese is different from the Italian mozzarella (the one for pizza, that is different from the one to be eaten raw). That's my recipe for homemade pizza, let's try and let me know. Apart the rising time, the rest of your Instructable is like I do it.About the Italian pizza you have at the restaurant, we do not have one style of pizza: the pizza in Rome is thin and crusty, the pizza in Naples is thicker. There are also some restaurant in Rome that cook a kind of thick pizza, but different from the one in Naples. And the restaurant have much powerful ovens too, that reach more than 500 F.We do not have "pepperoni pizza" too, indeed in Italian the word "peperoni" means "peppers": years ago I brought some American friends to a pizza restaurant in Rome, and one of them ordered the "pizza con peperoni" thinking it was a "pepperoni pizza". You can imagine his face when he saw a pizza without tomato sauce, only with mozzarella and slices of peppers! If in Italy you want something similar to pepperoni pizza, you shall ask for a "Diavola" (Devil's pizza), which is with a kind of hot spicy salami.

    I forgot, the semolina flour ("semola") is a good trick also! You can use the semolina even instead of the cornmeal for the pizza pan.

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  • ClaudioP34 commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy No Knead Bread3 months ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    I'm using an almost identical recipe for the no-kneat bread (I have even the same Dutch oven) and I can confirm it is as easy as you are showing. The only difference, I use a little less water, but it can be a matter of different floor (I'm in Italy, the floor can have different gluten quantities than American floor).Two variation that you can try: 1) the salt can be avoided, and it tastes good too. Perhaps I'm more used to the taste of some un-salted breads that are baked in central Italy, but I like both versions of the recipe, with or without salt. You can try;2) you can add some olive oil (only 4-5 g with your quantities), shape the dough like a thick pizza (if you want, add some rosemary leaves and a bit of oil and salt on top of it), and bake it on a baking sheet, without a lid. T...see more »I'm using an almost identical recipe for the no-kneat bread (I have even the same Dutch oven) and I can confirm it is as easy as you are showing. The only difference, I use a little less water, but it can be a matter of different floor (I'm in Italy, the floor can have different gluten quantities than American floor).Two variation that you can try: 1) the salt can be avoided, and it tastes good too. Perhaps I'm more used to the taste of some un-salted breads that are baked in central Italy, but I like both versions of the recipe, with or without salt. You can try;2) you can add some olive oil (only 4-5 g with your quantities), shape the dough like a thick pizza (if you want, add some rosemary leaves and a bit of oil and salt on top of it), and bake it on a baking sheet, without a lid. The results it's what is called a "focaccia".

    Sorry, I did not checked your pizza dough, now I'm curious. I'll read the instructable and I'll let you know.

    I tried for two years now an identical recipe (even, I have the same Dutch oven!): the sugar is needed only to activate the yeast. The recipe is really as super-easy as Matt shows and the result is tasting great, like a white bread. I'm in Italy, this recipe compares well against some white-floor bakery breads.If you like, you can even avoid salt, to have it tasting like the centre-Italy breads (that are without salt, for funny historical reasons).

    Having done this kind of bread a number of times, I can say that this is one of the very few recipes where the precision in measuring the ingredients is not so vital. Indeed, sometimes I did this bread without really measuring the water and the yeast: the results can be a little bit different (if you don't do a complete mess!), but it comes out good. Also, Matt wrote the measures for flour and water, so I assume he measured the quantities before putting the ingredients into the bowls.But in general I agree with you, because THIS recipe is for some reasons an exception: the rule is to use a scale.

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  • ClaudioP34 commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy Pumpkin Muffins3 months ago
    Easy Pumpkin Muffins

    It is my hypothesis too, probably it is better to bake it to evaporate some moisture.

    Sorry I reply only now, I tried the recipe with fresh pumpkin, cooked in a steamer, but the result was not good: inside the muffin remained too soft and wet. Maybe I shall reduce the quantity of fresh pumpkin: I weighted the pumpkin after having cooked it.

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  • How to build an insanely bright LED flashlight!

    "experiment with making the beam narrower"To make the beam narrower, you shall not use the reflector from the lamp.The lens you put on the LED already focuses the beam. Usually the lenses can be chosen to have a beam 120° wide, or 90° wide, or less. So, first step, just change the LED lens with one with a narrower beam angle.Second, the reflector of the old lamp was intended to be used with an old-stile car headlight which spread the light all over around the light bulb (while the LED send the beam almost from a flat surface): that's why the LED car headlights sold to replace old lights are arranged with many LEDs around "fake light bulbs" structures. Reflectors are intended to be more-or-less parabolic, with the bulb about in the focus. So, the reflector you...see more »"experiment with making the beam narrower"To make the beam narrower, you shall not use the reflector from the lamp.The lens you put on the LED already focuses the beam. Usually the lenses can be chosen to have a beam 120° wide, or 90° wide, or less. So, first step, just change the LED lens with one with a narrower beam angle.Second, the reflector of the old lamp was intended to be used with an old-stile car headlight which spread the light all over around the light bulb (while the LED send the beam almost from a flat surface): that's why the LED car headlights sold to replace old lights are arranged with many LEDs around "fake light bulbs" structures. Reflectors are intended to be more-or-less parabolic, with the bulb about in the focus. So, the reflector you are using is doing almost nothing to control the beam. Good news, it is easy and cheap enough to draw a parabola with the needed geometry, and DIY a cheap parabolic reflector. Use Google for ideas, it's plenty of projects that can be modified for your necessity (avoid the ones that are not explaining the geometry involved. Usually are used for solar ovens).Also, I saw some cheap, plastic, Fresnel lenses sold at "maker fairs" for doing science experiment that can be used to focus the beam of the LED. You can look on E-Bay for the cheaper ones. Just place the LED in the focal spot of the lens (you can measure the actual focal length just by focusing the Sun light on the focal spot). You shall match the right LED diffuser lense with the right beam angle to illuminate the Fresnel lens without wasting light. Just keep experimenting.Let me know if you go with the Fresnel lens or a DIY parabolic reflector, and the results.

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  • ClaudioP34 commented on fs woodworking's instructable How to Hide a Screw3 months ago
    How to Hide a Screw

    Indeed, too many "very old tricks" use to be jealously kept secret tricks by experienced woodworkers. Thank you very much for sharing, it's the first time I see it!

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  • ClaudioP34 commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy Pumpkin Muffins7 months ago
    Easy Pumpkin Muffins

    Thank you very much, I'll try the recipe next weekend and I'll let you know! :)

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  • Homemade Ice Cream - 3 Ingredients - No Ice Cream Maker

    Yes, for centuries the snow was mixed to fruit juices (expecially in Sicily, a warm island with a snow-topped volcano, mount Etna). For a deeper story:http://www.meetup.com/it-IT/sicily/pages/4804592/G...In a lot of old Italian palaces there are deep underground "snow caves" ("conserve della neve") that were used to maintain the snow during summertime.Sorry Matt if we are going OT :) Meanwhile, I don't remember how much fat there is in the American whipping cream (more than in the Italian, I remember), but your simple recipe is more similar to the Italian "gelato" recipe (which uses milk, not condensed milk) tha to the American "ice cream" (with custard and butter). I'll try it next summer :)

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  • ClaudioP34 commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy Pumpkin Muffins7 months ago
    Easy Pumpkin Muffins

    I would like to try it, but I have fresh pumpkin, not canned one. How can I use fresh pumpkin? I think I shall cook the pumpkin (in a steamer or in the oven) before, then put it into a blender before using it in the recipe. It seems to me that canned pumpkin is pre-cooked, am I right?

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  • Homemade Ice Cream - 3 Ingredients - No Ice Cream Maker

    Really, that's really how the ice cream was made in the XVI century, when, in Forence, Giuseppe Ruggeri won a contest for a “singular plate that had never been seen” to be served to Caterina de' Medici (future wife of king of France, Henry II). His recipe was a sorbet made with snow (that the noble families accumulated in "ice caves" near their palaces), sugar and "flavours" like juices from fruit, and flavoured water. Some years after Ruggeri, the architect Bernardo Bountalenti added also milk, cream and eggs to the snow. Nothing to add to the recipe, but maybe a nice story to tell your mom (maybe she did not even know she was a "gastronomical archeologist") :-)

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