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  • Tales From the Chip: LM1875 Audio Amplifier

    I need something for my surplus Geiger Counter, and I don't like wearing headphones. This should do the trick, as the 6V6, SE amp took too long of an extension cord :)

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  • Cliffystones commented on rgrokett's instructable PiEyeR Enhanced Thermal Camera2 weeks ago
    PiEyeR Enhanced Thermal Camera

    This Instructable is definitely a "keeper". I was thinking about one of those FLIR cameras that work with your phone, only to find out from others that you MUST have an internet/data connection for the thing to work. Not much good for being out in the wilderness if you can't get a signal!Just wondering, on a parallel subject here, since I know absolute zero about the Raspberry Pi and Adafruit stuff, but here goes.......Have you or anyone reading ever thought about re-inventing FLIR's add-on camera, but make it useful to anyone with a tablet or smart phone that has a USB port, and works without the internet? I'll be in my Sarcophagus way before I could possibly figure that one out, but if anyone comes up with a viable one that doesn't send me to the poorhouse it would be great.

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  • How to Make a Touch Switch Using One Mosfet

    Andrew, Truecolor,Have you ever purchased anything, only to find what little instructions there are are printed in "Chinglish"?While I agree with your basic premise Andrew, I believe there reason for not proofreading is that "NoskillsrequiredN" may not have access to someone who is fluent in both his/her native language and English. There's a big difference between accessibility and having "no desire" to do something. Two old sayings come into play here. Give the author "the reason of a doubt" as to their lack of editing and mostly "Never slap a gift horse in the face". And as for the chalkboard, I LOVED it! Brought back memories of circuit analysis classes I took wayyyy back, in which the teacher would sometimes use all the chalkboards ...

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    Andrew, Truecolor,Have you ever purchased anything, only to find what little instructions there are are printed in "Chinglish"?While I agree with your basic premise Andrew, I believe there reason for not proofreading is that "NoskillsrequiredN" may not have access to someone who is fluent in both his/her native language and English. There's a big difference between accessibility and having "no desire" to do something. Two old sayings come into play here. Give the author "the reason of a doubt" as to their lack of editing and mostly "Never slap a gift horse in the face". And as for the chalkboard, I LOVED it! Brought back memories of circuit analysis classes I took wayyyy back, in which the teacher would sometimes use all the chalkboards all the way around the room to solve a question, sometimes going as simple as 1+1=2 so that everyone in class would and could see WHY a certain answer was the correct one. God Bless all of those WWI and Korean war vets who chose to teach this stuff to us young bucks. And as for former East Los Angeles College Electronics Teacher Ben Mitchell, you'll always be remembered by many of us who thrived with your inspiration, RIP.

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  • How to Make a Touch Switch Using One Mosfet

    Way back in High School (1970s), I built one that needed line voltage and used an SCR. If I can find it, I'll post it here. But the moseft design, with a relay to switch higher voltages, is far safer. And furthermore IMHO, the chalk oard adds an air of nstalgia

    FYI, youse guize needs an edit button, but I digress....As I was saying before my oops....And furthermore IMHO, the chalkboard adds an air of nstalgia I really miss those things, along with the Bakrey truck and icecream man from my youth. Please take another, but turn the camera vertical to get the whole picture.Thanks,Cliffystones

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  • Cliffystones commented on dave5201's instructable How to Hide a Wall Wart Transformer2 months ago
    How to Hide a Wall Wart Transformer

    While my home was wired with category 5 (4 pairs, 8 conductors), even older homes have 4-wire (2-pair) voice cable. Home lines only use 2 of these wires, the other 2 (or 6) are for extra lines, data, and yes! Low Voltage DC. In my situation, the phone line enters the basement where it is connected to a "punch block" and the lines to the individual rooms go there separate ways. I used a spare pair from the kitchen and cut the cable to the wall wart. I plugged the wall wart in in a basement electrical outlet, soldered the 2 wires to an unused pair and connected the plug that goes in to the phone to the other end. You will probably want a volt meter to do this to ensure correct polarity, but if it's do-able for you it's a lot less work that adding an extra 110 volt outlet. BTW,...

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    While my home was wired with category 5 (4 pairs, 8 conductors), even older homes have 4-wire (2-pair) voice cable. Home lines only use 2 of these wires, the other 2 (or 6) are for extra lines, data, and yes! Low Voltage DC. In my situation, the phone line enters the basement where it is connected to a "punch block" and the lines to the individual rooms go there separate ways. I used a spare pair from the kitchen and cut the cable to the wall wart. I plugged the wall wart in in a basement electrical outlet, soldered the 2 wires to an unused pair and connected the plug that goes in to the phone to the other end. You will probably want a volt meter to do this to ensure correct polarity, but if it's do-able for you it's a lot less work that adding an extra 110 volt outlet. BTW, I worked for one of the "Baby Bells" back in the 1980s and I'm quite certain that this approach is legal and to code. I have also installed electrical outlets via the "cut-in" method on too many occasions to count. If you can use the phone cable it's a lot less cutting and cable fishing.

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  • Adding a Current Limit Feature to a Buck/Boost Converter

    I have to of these exact buck-boost modules. I have used one to keep the LED spotlights on my workbench at optimal brightness when the solar drops below 11.5v after a long day, and it works fabulous.But I believe I believe there is a simpler add-on circuit that should do the job. Here is a link to the schematic and the article. These are used to set a constant current source on a vacuum tube's plate supply. Hi haven't tried them with the Drok, but see no reason they shouldn't work. http://www.diyaudioprojects.com/Technical/Current-Regulator/

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  • Cliffystones commented on HannahP24's instructable Vanlife in a Top 20 Coldest City4 months ago
    Vanlife in a Top 20 Coldest City

    Just last week my Daughter's friend borrowed her bag. She camped somewhere on the Eastern side of the Rockies (i didn't ask where). I asked her how she likes it and she said she was very warm and cozy. I'll also add that Wiggy's bags are completely machine washable and dry-able. And I'm a 'cheap-skate"myself who always tries to find the lowest cost alternatives. Their bags are mid-range as far as price goes, but if i hadn't had one in 2009 during an Elk Hunting trip I would have probably had to have been air lifted to a hospital with severe hypothermia. The daytime high reached a whopping +16 degrees F, and without that bag I do believe I could have froze to death. I'm a native Angeleno and anything below 40 is "freezing" to all but the hardiest of us!On a side note, y...

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    Just last week my Daughter's friend borrowed her bag. She camped somewhere on the Eastern side of the Rockies (i didn't ask where). I asked her how she likes it and she said she was very warm and cozy. I'll also add that Wiggy's bags are completely machine washable and dry-able. And I'm a 'cheap-skate"myself who always tries to find the lowest cost alternatives. Their bags are mid-range as far as price goes, but if i hadn't had one in 2009 during an Elk Hunting trip I would have probably had to have been air lifted to a hospital with severe hypothermia. The daytime high reached a whopping +16 degrees F, and without that bag I do believe I could have froze to death. I'm a native Angeleno and anything below 40 is "freezing" to all but the hardiest of us!On a side note, you mentioned "thermal mass". The lack of thermal mass in gasses like oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc. is exactly why the whole idea of reducing carbon emissions to combat global warming is bunk. i'm not saying it's not happening, but a few million more tons of Carbon Dioxide in the air is akin to a few million tons of extra sand on a beach. It's irrelevant. Things like solar intensity, the distance from the Earth to the Sun, even the percent of salt in the ocean (like in the movie, "The Day After tomorrow") have a much bigger impact by leaps and bounds. And trading "carbon credits" like some former unnamed government employees espouse just moves the pollution from one location on our planet to another. And the atmosphere doesn't need a passport to redistribute the aforementioned pollution. But the folks buying and selling the credits sure do make money!

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  • Make a Powerful Generator From a Dead BLDC Motor:

    Cool idea. Could you suggest what types of equipment (in general) have the brushless motors these days? I know ceiling fans do, but they aren't 3-phase (at least the ones in an American home are not). And I remember people using motors from old business computers that used those big reel-to-reel tape drives for data.

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  • Cliffystones commented on Make Everything's instructable How To: Miter Saw Shadow Line4 months ago
    How To: Miter Saw Shadow Line

    He repeats it near the end as well. I just wanted to thank him for something I'll be needing in the not-to-distant future, and for the laugh I got from the typo :) I have a Harbor Freight 12" compound miter saw that i use on occasion, but the laser it has leaves much to be desired.Really though!, who wants to build something that is "difficult or impossible to manage, manipulate, or control." (definition of intractable). Not trying to give you grief M E, just a little good-natured ribbing from an old fart.

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  • Cliffystones commented on HannahP24's instructable Vanlife in a Top 20 Coldest City4 months ago
    Vanlife in a Top 20 Coldest City

    Great tips, but keep at least 2 windows cracked when using your little heater. Here's a solid recommendation from me. Go to "wiggys.com" read up on their products, especially their sleeping bags. i have no stake in the company, i'm just one extremely satisfied customer (think zero-degree and actually staying WARM!). They are neither the cheapest, nor the most expensive products. but if you buy their bags you will not only never want to or need to buy another, but you will hand them down to your children and grandchildren. I'll let the company owner, Jerry Wigtow, do his own sales pitch, but I could not be happier with his bags and the "sweater" I bought that I use when shoveling the driveway in single-digit weather.

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  • Easy Bluetooth Subwoofer Speaker (80W)

    What I found after experimentation was that the noise was feeding back through the power connection and contaminating the entire signal path. The little modules I mention above isolate the BT module's noise, but allow the DC to pass into it. And figuring it out nearly drove me to drinkin" :).

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  • Cliffystones commented on Paige Russell's instructable 10 Unusual Uses for Pencils4 months ago
    10 Unusual Uses for Pencils

    While I love your ideas, I can't remember the last time I found a pencil in our home that had an intact eraser!

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  • Easy Bluetooth Subwoofer Speaker (80W)

    First of all, yours is a beautiful design. And your woodworking skills are awesome.Now, as promised, a way to practically eliminate the noise cause by those Bluetooth adapters.I build tube amplifiers. I have added BT to several using the Sure Electronics module "KT Gadget" links to. These are great modules and very quiet. But they are still kind of large for building a smaller amp. I was at a trade fair and a fellow told me about the "Tiny Sine" BT modules. About 1/3 the size, so easy to tuck into smaller spaces. But noisy! I added a 3300mF cap at the circuit board voltage input which helped. But when I want to hear Sarah McLachlan (my dream girl) sing "Angel" live, I don't want to hear R2D2 screaming in the background.A little "Googling" and Lo...

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    First of all, yours is a beautiful design. And your woodworking skills are awesome.Now, as promised, a way to practically eliminate the noise cause by those Bluetooth adapters.I build tube amplifiers. I have added BT to several using the Sure Electronics module "KT Gadget" links to. These are great modules and very quiet. But they are still kind of large for building a smaller amp. I was at a trade fair and a fellow told me about the "Tiny Sine" BT modules. About 1/3 the size, so easy to tuck into smaller spaces. But noisy! I added a 3300mF cap at the circuit board voltage input which helped. But when I want to hear Sarah McLachlan (my dream girl) sing "Angel" live, I don't want to hear R2D2 screaming in the background.A little "Googling" and Lo and Behold!https://www.aliexpress.com/item/B0505S-1W-DC-DC-Is...If the link is bad, search for part number B0505S-1W.This is a 4-pin SIP chip. connect the 5 volt supply + to the input, the + output to the BT module, connect both negative terminals together and connect them to the supply and the BT module. I tried not combining the negative terminals, which killed R2D2 but the floating ground on the module caused 60 cycle hum that was worse that the original noise. I can now crank up that amp full blast with no music and not a peep of beep! And at under $2 shipped you can't lose.

    If you mean that "tweedle-deedle" electronic noise you hear when listening to music over a BT connection, then I have something for all of you folks! I'll create a separate comment above to describe what I did.

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  • Cliffystones commented on ucn's instructable Invisible Baby Gate4 months ago
    Invisible Baby Gate

    Just like sliding glass doors that are too clean. A few stickers of your choosing should help avoid an accident.

    Wow! It looks like it came with the house. As for the "invisibility" problem others have noted, a few stickers on the clear part would help. or just get a Border Collie like I have and the nose prints will do the trick:).

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  • Cliffystones commented on geotek's instructable Folding Sandpaper for Longer Life4 months ago
    Folding Sandpaper for Longer Life

    Many thanks for this simple tip. My late Father was also raised during the depression and loved to re-finish old furniture. I still have fond memories of helping him . Though he seldom hand sanded, doing mostly table tops, bar rails and such for the local Moose Lodge and VFW.

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  • Harvesting Sound Energy From Passing Cars

    One thing I have an abundance of where I live is wind!!! I have researched, but turbines are not practical for me due to my lot size and the whining of the HOA. But these things, while still barely out of the concept stage, sound incredible! No spinning blades, no moving parts, no worry about wind direction, no need for all of the peripheral nonsense needed for a single-residence wind system. While I'm sure drawbacks will be encountered, they can't be any worse than those of traditional windmills. So sign me up!

    And if you live by the train tracks at least there's one up side!

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  • Cliffystones commented on abzza's instructable Ultimate DIY Breadboard Power Supply5 months ago
    Ultimate DIY Breadboard Power Supply

    This is a great and wonderfully simple idea for us experimenters. Your design uses the LM317, which can supply up to 1.5 amps. You can easily replace the 317 with an LM350 that will provide 3 amps, or an LM338 for up to 5 amps! And no need to re-design, just plug em' in. Also I believe I'll be building a negative regulator version of this for use in designing op-amp circuits, as many need a split negative and positive rail with respect to ground.

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  • Converting an Old Radio Into a Spotify Streaming Box

    Yours is a wonderful idea. I am especially happy that you didn't "gut" the radio as there are so few left and they ain't makin' any more!I also had an idea for a simpler approach. Just install a Bluetooth receiver module in the radio, then stream Spotify, or pretty much any music service from your phone/tablet. Of course this wouldn't be a stand-alone unit like you've created, which I love as well.

    I've worked with tube circuitry myself since the early 1970s. A few years back I decided to pretty much dump all the solid-state, board-swapping nonsense and re-discovered tubes (Thanks to Diyaudioprojects.com). I completely agree with your initial post. A stern warning for anyone not familiar with these circuits is a kindness, and quite possibly a life saver, NOT (like the example used above) simply a legal disclaimer. Folks like "yrrlguthrie" need to try putting their fingers across one of those charged caps, then they can pop-off! At bare minimum, several hundred DC volts ripping up your arm is a very painful way to discover hitherto unspoken swear words. When I'm doing a build I can count on at least a couple of those enlightening experiences :(. And that's mostly due...

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    I've worked with tube circuitry myself since the early 1970s. A few years back I decided to pretty much dump all the solid-state, board-swapping nonsense and re-discovered tubes (Thanks to Diyaudioprojects.com). I completely agree with your initial post. A stern warning for anyone not familiar with these circuits is a kindness, and quite possibly a life saver, NOT (like the example used above) simply a legal disclaimer. Folks like "yrrlguthrie" need to try putting their fingers across one of those charged caps, then they can pop-off! At bare minimum, several hundred DC volts ripping up your arm is a very painful way to discover hitherto unspoken swear words. When I'm doing a build I can count on at least a couple of those enlightening experiences :(. And that's mostly due to being an "old-timer" who has become too comfortable around the things. So when in the unlikely event I do electrocute myself I'll only have my own sorry ar$e to blame :).

    If you could find a speaker that would mount in place of the original, it would make little if any difference. Most newer speakers are dependent on the properly designed enclosure to produce the best quality sound. The best thing would be to have the original rebuilt with a new voice coil and cone. I tried the new speaker idea in a jukebox and the sound quality wasn't any better so I had the originals rebuilt,

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  • Cliffystones commented on randofo's instructable Making an Audio Mixer6 months ago
    Making an Audio Mixer

    I use one like the first schematic for testing my bread-boarded tube amps. I have an old Sansa MP3 player I couple to the input to check music quality. But lately I've been contemplating building a tube version from the back pages of the RCA receiving tube manual. Having the active amplification stage I feel will produce better mixed output. Your method is certainly simpler, and safer for folks who fear and/or don't understand "Ready Kilowatt".

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  • Cliffystones commented on mecanicafina's instructable Safe Capacitor Discharge Tool8 months ago
    Safe Capacitor Discharge Tool

    I build tube amps. I'm old. I'm lazy. I always find myself looking around for a resistor on my bench (one I'm using during prototyping). If I don't find it fast enough, then the laziness re-asserts itself. Then I feel the wrath of that 500uF, 800VDC cap I was too lazy to properly discharge. it's really amazing the new ways your mind can use old, and invent new swear words when a hand muscle gets that amount of power through it for that instant!I want to thank you, mecanicafina for inspiring me into making your circuit. But I'll probably use an old prescription medicine bottle as I have quite a few of those in my old age :).

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  • Cliffystones commented on brett_builds's instructable Commute Travel Time LED Indicator8 months ago
    Commute Travel Time LED Indicator

    Your video shows green light for a "good" commute. Does it change to yellow, then red as the commute gets longer? If not, consider this a suggestion. Not that I would have ever seen green when I commuted through Downtown Los Angeles (though that was way back in the 80s). Also, you could add an extra "lower" commute level for urbanites that would release a small amount of a foul odor with the verbal admonition "go back to bed!" when the commute was going to be impossible :)

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  • Cliffystones commented on Nate5b's instructable Makin' Buckboard Bacon!8 months ago
    Makin' Buckboard Bacon!

    Your instructable has to be the best one since 'How to slice bread" :). One of my favorite meals is Bacon and Eggs at breakfast while camping. I'd even love to be able to buy bacon scented aroma therapy oil!

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  • Extend Defective Fluorescent Tube-Light Life

    While I would never do this as a long-term solution for the same reasons others have stated, this is great to know about in a pinch when you have a dead lamp or an annoying flickering one. If it holds you until you can get a new lamp, great! Thanks for sharing this idea.

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  • Electronics Components Storage Cabinet II

    Here in the US we have a company called Harbor Freight that sells cases almost identical to yours. I made several racks as well, but I have to say yours are a lot easier than mine on the eyes. I used scrap OSB (oriented strand board) from all of the new housing construction in my area, so they look pretty industrial.

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  • Cliffystones commented on wduraes's instructable TV - Time Machine9 months ago
    TV - Time Machine

    At 58 years old, I get a kick out of you young-ins. Black and White TV sets in the weekly trash are exactly what got me in to electronics way, waaaay back in the late 60s and early 70s. It really warms my heart to see interest in old technology making a comeback with younger generations. I was at an auction last year where a late-teen, early 20s young lady out bid me on a box of vinyl records. Come to find out she only wanted the Led Zeppelin IV album! Too cool!Great work on your project! I'll have to keep my eyes open for old B&W TV sets and maybe restore one for myself now.

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  • The Ring of Fire: a Cheap Steel Wool Pyrotechnic Display

    Oh I completely agree. Either a geared-down motor or one with an electronic speed control. My thought is that would be safer than spinning it around by hand. But if you're going to do it by hand, wear long sleeves of cotton at least.

    How about using a small electric motor to do the spinning? And maybe a remote ignition source by using small-gauge speaker wire running from a battery up to the steel wool?

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  • Cliffystones commented on thobson's instructable Building A Stereo Tube Amp9 months ago
    Building A Stereo Tube Amp

    Sergio,I've been in electronics since i was a kid in the 60s. The "tube sound" I grew up with consisted of a 1940-era table radio and various televisions with a single 3-4 inch speaker. Combine that with the fact that I was raised by a Missourian (The "Show Me State") and you'll understand why my first reaction to tube audiophiles was "surrrreeee they're better. Now go with that nice man in the white coat". A few years back I decided to buy and restore an old Jukebox. While it's amp was soild state, my EBay searching showed me just how much these folks (I thought of as fools) would spend on a tube amp. This was the kind of simple electronics I had build as far back as the 8th grade. I decided to have a second look at what all of the fuss was about. I ...

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    Sergio,I've been in electronics since i was a kid in the 60s. The "tube sound" I grew up with consisted of a 1940-era table radio and various televisions with a single 3-4 inch speaker. Combine that with the fact that I was raised by a Missourian (The "Show Me State") and you'll understand why my first reaction to tube audiophiles was "surrrreeee they're better. Now go with that nice man in the white coat". A few years back I decided to buy and restore an old Jukebox. While it's amp was soild state, my EBay searching showed me just how much these folks (I thought of as fools) would spend on a tube amp. This was the kind of simple electronics I had build as far back as the 8th grade. I decided to have a second look at what all of the fuss was about. I figured that if I couldn't hear the difference at least i could make a mint repairing old guitar amps like the one the 'American Pickers" bought and re-sold for several thousand dollars.I finished my first 6V6-SE amp and boy! I was impressed for exactly the reasons you list. Depth, detail and 'texture" unheard of in even the more expensive "Wave Radios". Tube amps are a personal choice, not necessarily for everyone. But if you actually love to "LISTEN" to "MUSIC", not just have noise to fill in the background, then you WILL notice a difference.I suppose I will never understand folks like "pfred" who want to tell you how bad something you love is and if they think that they are somehow correct. Music, just like the human brain and the definition of a beautiful woman, is subjective. If freddie likes his Waveradio or i-pod better, more power to him. I'll put one of Bruce Heran's Oddwatts up against anything in a blind listening test and it will win every time.

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  • Cliffystones commented on gravityisweak's instructable Coat Hanger Drill Bit10 months ago
    Coat Hanger Drill Bit

    Wow! Back in the 80s I hung ceiling fans for an appliance store. I would use a piece of wire from Romex cable and poke it through the ceiling drywall to locate the mounting spot. But this is awesome! It certainly could have save me time on those jobs, and will in the future. Thanks for sharing.

    My Father-in-law (now departed) taught me to chop the end off of finishing nails when using them on moulding. That way they didn't split the wood. The blunt end "pushed" the wood out of the way.

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  • Cliffystones commented on SpecificLove's instructable Survival Whistle from a Soup Can11 months ago
    Survival Whistle from a Soup Can

    As a kid my friends and i would use metal pallet straps we would find by the local railroad tracks. Thanks for reminding me of the memory. And great idea!

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  • Cliffystones commented on dave5201's instructable How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer11 months ago
    How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer

    Thanks Mike,And to anyone else reading this, a little clarification. I've been doing "old work" residential electrical since 1984. I've been doing telecommunications wiring since 1985, including high-rises in down-town Los Angeles and Orange County California. As for both safety and code compliance I have a pretty good idea as to what's safe, what's legal and what you can "get away with". Like you stated, multi-pair cables can and are used for low supply voltages in telecom equipment routinely. I'll add that as for the safety of someone coming along later, besides experience and test equipment, any technician worth their sale will label the cables accordingly. An in commercial applications those connections must be mapped out in the telecom blueprints if they are ...

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    Thanks Mike,And to anyone else reading this, a little clarification. I've been doing "old work" residential electrical since 1984. I've been doing telecommunications wiring since 1985, including high-rises in down-town Los Angeles and Orange County California. As for both safety and code compliance I have a pretty good idea as to what's safe, what's legal and what you can "get away with". Like you stated, multi-pair cables can and are used for low supply voltages in telecom equipment routinely. I'll add that as for the safety of someone coming along later, besides experience and test equipment, any technician worth their sale will label the cables accordingly. An in commercial applications those connections must be mapped out in the telecom blueprints if they are to pass building codes. I wasn't criticizing the author Dave's approach for being unsafe or not being to code. On the contrary his approach seems perfectly safe to me. I was adding to his post with my experience and showing him and others a simpler, quicker, and for folks who's experience dealing with house current may be lacking, a bit safer. At least even I can state that a person is much more likely to be "pinched" by 117VAC then the little 6 to 12 volts used by most "wall warts". But don't do like me when I was a teen and attempt to clean your car battery after washing your car, standing ankle-deep in wet grass. If you do, you'll learn about Ohm's Law in a very unpleasant way :(.

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  • Cliffystones commented on dave5201's instructable How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer11 months ago
    How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer

    While I see your point, I don't understand why you think my approach is any more dangerous than messing with house current. Both can put you in the ER if you don't know what you're doing. And I've been one of those "Telephone Engineers" you speak of. We come equipped with test equipment, knowledge and training that would preclude all but the most incompetent of us from having an accident.Most residential telecommunications wiring in at least the last 15-20 years uses a is cable with 8 separate wires grouped into 2 conductor, twisted pairs. There is very low voltage on the active phone pair, unless someone calls. Then a 90 volt signal is applied to ring the old mechanical bells. Even in old homes there are 2 pairs and only one is used unless the residence has 2 separate phone...

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    While I see your point, I don't understand why you think my approach is any more dangerous than messing with house current. Both can put you in the ER if you don't know what you're doing. And I've been one of those "Telephone Engineers" you speak of. We come equipped with test equipment, knowledge and training that would preclude all but the most incompetent of us from having an accident.Most residential telecommunications wiring in at least the last 15-20 years uses a is cable with 8 separate wires grouped into 2 conductor, twisted pairs. There is very low voltage on the active phone pair, unless someone calls. Then a 90 volt signal is applied to ring the old mechanical bells. Even in old homes there are 2 pairs and only one is used unless the residence has 2 separate phone lines, with different numbers incoming. It doesn't take any technical knowledge to determine which pair is active, just a little logic, deduction and process of elimination. Individuals need to be honest with themselves before engaging in a task such as this. If you're confused or unsure as to how to do it, pay somebody (or offer free beer!) who will do it correctly and safely. This bit of advice holds true for all instructables, not just those involving electricity.

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  • Cliffystones commented on Maanav.'s instructable Homemade Speaker11 months ago
    Homemade Speaker

    I remember way back in the early 70s in High School Electronics class. Some cranially challenged guy would come into the shop and ask the teacher if anyone could make him a speaker. My instructor would kindly give them the 2-minute lesson as to how speakers themselves needed to be manufactured, while us guys in "The Big Bang Theory" club tried not to laugh out loud lest we pay later on. Too bad we didn't have your invention. All kidding aside, your invention is remarkable. I can see you and others refining the design as to wire gauge, number of turns of wire, spring tension, and maybe other parameters to refine the fidelity. My only warning, from experience, would be to put a resistor in series with the coil. Something 20 ohms or less, just enough for the electronics in the...

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    I remember way back in the early 70s in High School Electronics class. Some cranially challenged guy would come into the shop and ask the teacher if anyone could make him a speaker. My instructor would kindly give them the 2-minute lesson as to how speakers themselves needed to be manufactured, while us guys in "The Big Bang Theory" club tried not to laugh out loud lest we pay later on. Too bad we didn't have your invention. All kidding aside, your invention is remarkable. I can see you and others refining the design as to wire gauge, number of turns of wire, spring tension, and maybe other parameters to refine the fidelity. My only warning, from experience, would be to put a resistor in series with the coil. Something 20 ohms or less, just enough for the electronics in the driving device to not see a dead short across the speaker terminals. At worst you could fry the output stage on some devices. But most likely you will trip an over current protection circuit (Like I once did on my $600 receiver playing the Stones too loud) and then wonder what happened.Your instructable is a definite keeper for me and when I get a chance I need to toy with the design and report back.

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  • Cliffystones commented on dave5201's instructable How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer11 months ago
    How To Hide a Wall Wart Transformer

    I did this to our wall phone in the kitchen. But I used one pair of wires not being used in the 4-pair cable carrying the phone signal. I cut the plug off of the wall wart, attached it to the unused pair, then attached the wall wart to the other end of the pair where it meets the rest of the phone wiring in my basement. Of course if you don't have a basement and/or your junction is not accessible then you'll need to do your own investigation into an alternate hook-up location. You have to keep the polarities straight of course, and have an electrical outlet for the wall wart at the other end. But this method avoids wiring the 110 volt outlet and is less labor intensive. Not to mention that you're only messing with low voltage DC so there's less chance of ending up in the morgue!

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  • Cliffystones commented on mxx's instructable Coke Top Volume Control12 months ago
    Coke Top Volume Control

    I'm going to try this with the brass part of spent 12ga. shotgun shells.

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  • How to Identify a Fake Samsung Micro SD Memory Card

    On a side note, virtually everything available for sale is counterfeited these days. I wanted to buy a good friend a Yeti brand coffee mug on Amazon. It was disheartening the amount of reviewers who had purchased one and found it to be a really cheap knock-off. So I bought directly from the manufacturer's web site. Shame on Amazon and other sites for not doing a better job of policing these counterfeiters!

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  • Retro-Mod - Bluetooth Speaker Madness

    While what you showed me as a 'Beyond hope" radio was one I'd try to refurbish, I admire your conversion. Each of us has our won level of ability, determination and comfort, especially when dealing with high voltage. I'm 57 years old, and it comforts me to see younger folks admire and preserve past technology for their descendants. One idea I had that you could still implement. You could add a small transformer or switch-mode power supply to make the filaments light. The warm glow of filaments is what got me interested in electronics as a small child in the 1960s. I remember always wanting to sneek a peek behind any radio or TV set. For tube information do a search on the tube number and "data sheet". This will give you the pin connections, voltage and current of ...

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    While what you showed me as a 'Beyond hope" radio was one I'd try to refurbish, I admire your conversion. Each of us has our won level of ability, determination and comfort, especially when dealing with high voltage. I'm 57 years old, and it comforts me to see younger folks admire and preserve past technology for their descendants. One idea I had that you could still implement. You could add a small transformer or switch-mode power supply to make the filaments light. The warm glow of filaments is what got me interested in electronics as a small child in the 1960s. I remember always wanting to sneek a peek behind any radio or TV set. For tube information do a search on the tube number and "data sheet". This will give you the pin connections, voltage and current of the filaments. You can probably use a 12 volt supply and just wire 6 volt filaments in series-parallel. You don't even need the original tubes. So if this one has all series filaments of 50V, 35V, etc. , just replace them with cheap 6 or 12 volt ones for the glowing effect.

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  • Cliffystones commented on Nikus's instructable 555 Useless Machine1 year ago
    555 Useless Machine

    The 555 ic has many, many practical uses. I'm sure if you do a little looking around there are probably still "cookbooks" for the 555 out there. I use them for delay circuits in combination with a relay to keep the B+ high voltage off of the cathodes in my tube amps until the filaments get hot.

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  • Cliffystones commented on smurray2's instructable Old HDD Vibration Table1 year ago
    Old HDD Vibration Table

    Those pager/phone vibrator motors are available all the time on different surplus sites if someone decides to go that route. I had a thought. How about just adding a little weight to one side of the platter? Probably a flat washer or two epoxied to it.

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  • Cliffystones commented on tlp801's instructable Trash-Vac!!1 year ago
    Trash-Vac!!

    Kim,In his defense, I have heard the term "costed out" more than a few times when referring to business dealings. I just checked a site "grammarist.com" and it would appear to be permissible under certain circumstances. My pet peeve is the made -up word "irregardless", which far too many supposedly educated people seem to think is a real word.

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  • IKEA Hack: 15 Minute Desktop Speaker Stands

    Quick yes. But "dirty"? Those look like fine furniture from uptown! Great idea. I'm always looking for materials to make my amplifiers look better, so I need to make a trip up to Ikea. Another great material is pre-finished hardwood flooring. Youn can get remnants and odd-lots from the Habitat for Humanity "ReStore" for a buck or two a board or cheaper.

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  • Cliffystones commented on anil8tor's instructable Solar Heater for My Shop1 year ago
    Solar Heater for My Shop

    Great idea! Now I know what to do with our old dish. One suggestion. Instead of water in the heat exchanger, use automotive anti-freeze. This will be mandatory if you live someplace that gets below freezing.

    Another thought. If you can find a balance of flow rate and volume from the dish coil to the heat exchanger you can probably eliminate the need for a storage tank and simply circulate the anti-freeze between the exchanger and the dish. I'd think the easiest way to do this would be to add a variable speed control to the pump controlled by the fluid temperature via computer/Arduino. The down side would be no storage of heated fluid during cloudy days and night time.

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  • Cliffystones commented on MiiBooth's instructable Home Made Air Cooler (Video)1 year ago
    Home Made Air Cooler (Video)

    Excellent idea. I've also seen those evaporative coolers made from 5-gallon plastic buckets. I'm thinking I could use your idea of soda cans and salt ice, and combine those with water. Just a few (2 or 3) would cool the water tremendously. Then take the plastic bucket and wrap it with some foam insulation to keep it colder longer. I love this site! Even if I don't decide to build the exact same thing someone else has, there are always those little ideas incorporated into the designs that can be "re-purposed" to fit another project.

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  • Water Valve Light Switch for a Pipe Lamp

    I saw some 'Steam Punk" lamps in a gift shop with dimmers in place of the simple switches. I can only assume that the valve body must be large enough to accommodate a combination potentiometer/switch to operate the dimmer. But I had an idea. I'm thinking about drilling through the back of the valve behind the stem to attach the shaft of a potentiometer with the potentiometer outside of the valve. Then the valve could be mounted on a chassis with the potentiometer hidden inside the chassis. It would be neat to use as a volume control on an amplifier!

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  • Setting Up the Perfect Electronics Workplace

    You must be newlyweds :). Give it time.

    I've worked in electronics since the early 1970s. No fume extractor. No problem yet, but I suppose I'm way beyond help at this point. When we worked on bicycles and cars we even used gasoline to wash our hands! And I do agree with you here, you younger folks should heed this advice. I had a very rare, but very curable form of cancer 26 years ago that my Doctors had no idea how I could have developed at my age. Something commonly found in senior citizens called Liposarcoma. And I do now have a vent fan with an intake right at workbench level that takes the smoke outside.

    Your approach will work, to a point. I've found that when I can't see the screwdriver right in front of me it's time to do a "reboot". I do this also when I'm knocking things off the bench due to clutter, or I'm just at a point where I need to rest my eyes. I will put most tools and materials back in their respective storage places, especially the ones I know I'm done with for now. I've found that this minimizes my personal exasperation, especially when I'm thinking about blowing up the whole shebang.

    You did a great job showing otherwise "organizationally challenged" folks how to develop a little order in their work places. So, instead of re-inventing your wheel, I thought I'd add a couple of things I've done over the years to make my situation more ordered and less chaotic.I have 2 benches in my basement, one for hobby stuff and one for my paying job (i'm self-employed). I've included a few pictures here. As you can see, I mounted drawers below both my benches. I put the tools I use most in them so all I have to do is open the drawer in front of me. You can get add-on drawer brackets, even whole drawers at DIY centers and on line. They don't need to be to big or too deep, just for the stuff you are always reaching for.Another problem I have always had, that doesn't get ...

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    You did a great job showing otherwise "organizationally challenged" folks how to develop a little order in their work places. So, instead of re-inventing your wheel, I thought I'd add a couple of things I've done over the years to make my situation more ordered and less chaotic.I have 2 benches in my basement, one for hobby stuff and one for my paying job (i'm self-employed). I've included a few pictures here. As you can see, I mounted drawers below both my benches. I put the tools I use most in them so all I have to do is open the drawer in front of me. You can get add-on drawer brackets, even whole drawers at DIY centers and on line. They don't need to be to big or too deep, just for the stuff you are always reaching for.Another problem I have always had, that doesn't get better with age, is a bad habit of forgetting to turn off the solder station. If I go several days between work, this can cause a heck of a lot of corrosion on the tips, not to mention the fire hazard if left unattended. So I bought timers with 1,2,4 and 8 hour increments. I wired these to relays with 120 volt ciols. The contact are connected to the sockets. I sometimes need a higher wattage iron (75-100 watts) for work on point-to-point vacuum tube work, hence the duplex outlet. If I forget to turn off the iron(s), I can rest assured that they will turn off on their own. A little peace of mind, and less replacing burnt-up tips.The workbench in the picture was a piece of countertop I got from a Habitat for Humanity "ReStore". I think I paid $5 for it. These stores, if you have one near you, are great places to pick up just about any kind of building material cheap.The last pix is my "tunes". A shameless plug for DIY vacuum tube amplifiers, for sure :).

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  • Multi-Function Walking Stick II  - Storage Compartment

    Not squeamish here, but for those who are, couldn't you just get a bottle of ammonia?

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  • Cliffystones commented on RCLifeOn's instructable DIY Mini Air Conditioner1 year ago
    DIY Mini Air Conditioner

    I'm "Mr. Scarasm" myself. I just need to remember to add that smiley face so folks will know I'm joking!

    2 words here. Sodium Hydrochloride. For you non-tech folks that's chlorine bleach :)But I get your point. Probably better to use a container that had water or even juice in it.In defense of the original builder, this is simply a micro-sized swamp cooler. Something akin to those "USB Powered Fans" that put a tiny breeze right at your fingertips/sweating forehead. Only with the ice, this becomes one of those, only on micro-steroids. A nice little cold breeze to take the edge off of an otherwise uncomfortably warm environment. Sure it could be modded/enlarged/ altered etc. But kudos to the builder. The rest of you folks need to heed the expression "Don't slap a gift horse in the face".

    I'm not going to inquire as to your choosing your profile name :). But i have to ask, have you ever bred cockatiels? I had a mated pair many years ago who produced many offspring. Funnest, most friendly, cutest birds, kinda like having a miniature dog, except they can't be house-trained.

    You just probably are right. I get those "old sayings" mixed-up all the time. Could be "Don't bite the hand that feeds you" I'm confused with.But the ideas on this site are all at least descent to absolutely awesome. Even if what I see isn't for me, many times the ideas presented lead me to ideas along other lines that I hadn't thought of. I've seen coolers like this made from 5 gallon buckets, that the creator used to cool his tent at the Burning Man festival. But I hadn't thought of a micro-mini personal version, it's pretty cool.

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  • The Handiest Contraption You'll Ever Take Camping

    Will it wash the camp dishes? Just kidding, great idea!

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  • Cliffystones followed GreatScottLab1 year ago
  • Cliffystones commented on depotdevoid's instructable Wifi Controlled Roving Webcam!1 year ago
    Wifi Controlled Roving Webcam!

    No cats here. A 70+ pound Border Collie/Australian Shepard that would love to swallow the thing whole, though!I picked up a Pan Tilt WiFi cam for $5 at a yard sale so....... Something I'll definitely have to try when I get a minute or two :)Thanks for sharing.

    Google "Australian Shepherd". I misspelled it the first time, sorry. They are a herding and hunting dog. Mine is a Border Collie mix. He just caught a small cottontail rabbit a few days ago. When my wife and son tried to get him to leave it alone he swallowed the darn thing whole! So you can see my concern in leaving him alone in the house with a rolling web cam :).

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  • Cliffystones commented on Ridwann's instructable How to create a FIX point1 year ago
    How to create a FIX point

    A I'm on the West side of "The Pond", I believe this concept is German or Austrian? A little background for us Yankees would be enlightening. I will say that your English is way better than my German :).I do see great potential in an idea like this. But the "fixers" should negotiate some sort of compensation (trade or cash).. I'm one of those "fixers", semi-retired, and while I can and do volunteer my services to people of limited means, I like to eat and keep a roof over my head as well. Another concern that seems to be lost here is the fact that most repairs need more than a table and chair to accomplish. This is especially true with technology. Finding the problem can require more than just a screwdriver, and replacement parts may not always be avail...

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    A I'm on the West side of "The Pond", I believe this concept is German or Austrian? A little background for us Yankees would be enlightening. I will say that your English is way better than my German :).I do see great potential in an idea like this. But the "fixers" should negotiate some sort of compensation (trade or cash).. I'm one of those "fixers", semi-retired, and while I can and do volunteer my services to people of limited means, I like to eat and keep a roof over my head as well. Another concern that seems to be lost here is the fact that most repairs need more than a table and chair to accomplish. This is especially true with technology. Finding the problem can require more than just a screwdriver, and replacement parts may not always be available. But just the idea of bringing "fixers" as you call them, together with folks who need stuff "fixed" is great. Gives do-it-yourself types like me a venue for showcasing our abilities and meeting other like-minded "fixers" with similar and different skills than our own as well.Another thought. You made these tables and chairs, which is very cool. I don't know about your locale, but here in the US we have many, many "second hand" and "thrift" stores where these can be bought for much less than the material required to build them. Although I can see portability being an issue.

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  • Cliffystones commented on entomophile's instructable Folding Paint Booth1 year ago
    Folding Paint Booth

    A million thanks for posting this. I have a vent fan in my basement, but this will ensure that the "cloud" of particles doesn't linger. Excellent!

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