author2
29CommentsJohannesburg, South AfricaJoined March 12th, 2008
I am a blade smith situated in Johannesburg. Love the bush, wildlife, fishing and camping. Love working with my hands.
  • Small Pattern Welded "Damascus" Steel Kife (With NO Power Hammer)

    Just some advise. You said "Gently move it around so you get an even quench". This should never be done as that is exactly what causes warping, even in a normalized piece of steel. Moving the blade causes it to cool down faster on the one side it is moving towards, and that will cause it to warp. When you quench, go into the oil cutting edge first, and hold it completely still till the whole blade has lost it's red color and is completely black.On the subject of oil. Clarified pork fat makes a pretty good quenching oil. Just ad a bit of manual gearbox oil to it to keep flies away.

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  • Crossforge commented on seamster's instructable 12 Unusual Uses for Nails4 months ago
    12 Unusual Uses for Nails

    To harden steel, the hotter is not the better. Get a magnet. Then heat the steel till it does not stick to the magnet anymore. This non-magnetic temperature is the temperature at which you want to dunk it in oil to harden it. Also hardenability is dependent on the carbon content and other ingredients in the steel. Normal nails, often called wire nails do not harden much. Cut flat nails and masonry nails are hardened as Bruce S61 mentioned. However, if you re-shape them by heating and hammering or grinding the hardness will have been lost so after working them into the desired shape you want to re-harden them by heating to non-magnetic and then rapidly cooling them in oil.

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  • Viking Bearded Axe (Skeggox) From An Old woodsman Axe

    Vikings used this design as you had a fairly long cutting edge but needed less steel to make it. Cracks can't be fixed by heating and hammering as carbon and dirt particles will have found their way into the cracks preventing the steel from forge welding together even at very high temperature. You did the right thing by grinding out the cracks.

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  • Forged Damascus Chain Knife - Drop Point Hunter

    Yes, it is easy to build. Only problem is here in SA where I am a ram, even 2nd hand is crazy expensive. To import is also not really an option as the shipping cost is so high, and once the government has slammed a very nice import tax on top of it you are back to square one with the high cost. For that reason very few of us around here have them.

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  • Forged Damascus Chain Knife - Drop Point Hunter

    Yes, cable does make a nice knife. I've been using chains from chainsaws. Get very nice patterning from those. I think if you flattened your billet from the other side (turned it 90 degrees before flattening) you would have picked up more patterning.

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  • Forged Damascus Chain Knife - Drop Point Hunter

    Nice one bud. Well done. Unfortunately not many people have access to a power press. Yes, it can be done with a hammer but as you and I know that is tricky and a LOT of hard work.Please don't get me wrong here. Not trying to put you off, but rather trying to warn others, if you don't have a press, don't go wasting time to try and make this unless you have done forge welding by hammer before.

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  • Hand Crank Generator / Battery Charger

    If you remove the grinding wheel and replace it with a steel disc of the same size that would make a nice flywheel with more weight and it would all still be the same size.

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