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  • How to Extract Your Own DNA Using Household Kitchen Items

    I've read web articles about people doing their own DNA processing. It was not clear whether they were simply extraction it, or were sequencing it (and how they were doing so if they were). My impression (and memory is not as good as it used to be) was that they were sequencing and manipulating DNA.Is this possible? Do today's PCs have sufficient power to do the sequencing? It's my understanding that the human genome was sequenced as quickly as it was because huge networks of standalone PCs and other computers were used to do the processing for analysis, not some network of Crays owned by the Pentagon. I'd really love to read more about this if anyone has references they will share.

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  • How To Build a Natural Dry Stacked Free Standing or Retaining Wall

    Great job on the stonework!!!Thanks for sharing!

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  • Cueball21 commented on hhawkin2's instructable How to Efficiently Dice a Bell Pepper2 months ago
    How to Efficiently Dice a Bell Pepper

    I use a slightly different method.First I slice horizontally across the stem end making certain that the base of the stem is removed. I then slice the bottom of the pepper in a similar fashion. (I save the bottom end bits but not the top 'shoulder' bits.) After the 2 horizontal slices, I find slice vertically down one of the indented areas. This is where the fibrous pieces are inside a pepper. I then unroll the pepper and use my knife nearly flat on the cutting board to slice out the fibrous ribs. I check to be sure I got all the ribs and trim any remaining. Depending on the size of the pepper, I slice the now flat sides into 2 or 3 pieces and lay them on top of each other. Next, I orient the pieces so that my knife will slice from what was the top to bottom in strips the size of...see more »I use a slightly different method.First I slice horizontally across the stem end making certain that the base of the stem is removed. I then slice the bottom of the pepper in a similar fashion. (I save the bottom end bits but not the top 'shoulder' bits.) After the 2 horizontal slices, I find slice vertically down one of the indented areas. This is where the fibrous pieces are inside a pepper. I then unroll the pepper and use my knife nearly flat on the cutting board to slice out the fibrous ribs. I check to be sure I got all the ribs and trim any remaining. Depending on the size of the pepper, I slice the now flat sides into 2 or 3 pieces and lay them on top of each other. Next, I orient the pieces so that my knife will slice from what was the top to bottom in strips the size of dice I want. I then gather the strips into a bunch and turn them 90 degrees to my knife and slice the strips into bits of about the same size as the width vertical strip cuts. If done correctly, this takes no more than a minute. If I'm not in a hurry, I examine the bottom end and slice out the ribs, then make a quick dice of the bits left.

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  • Cueball21 commented on jessyratfink's instructable pulled pork recipe3 months ago
    pulled pork recipe

    Very good Instructable! You gave complete and clear instructions with all the necessary details for getting good results.I cook a boston butt about once a month or more following your protocol up to the point of cooking. Instead of an oven, I do mine on my Weber kettle gill with charcoal and hickory wood chunks to give it a smokey flavor - which I prefer for pulled pork.I place charcoal in a circle around the perimeter of my grill on the charcoal grate leaving a gap of about 6 inches. The bottom layer is ~4 briquettes wide with the next layer 3, the next 2, and 1 on top. I place the hickory lumps - depending on size - about 6 inches apart. I light about a dozen coals in my charcoal chimney and get them glowing red hot with the white outer ash shell. I then pour these hot coals on ...see more »Very good Instructable! You gave complete and clear instructions with all the necessary details for getting good results.I cook a boston butt about once a month or more following your protocol up to the point of cooking. Instead of an oven, I do mine on my Weber kettle gill with charcoal and hickory wood chunks to give it a smokey flavor - which I prefer for pulled pork.I place charcoal in a circle around the perimeter of my grill on the charcoal grate leaving a gap of about 6 inches. The bottom layer is ~4 briquettes wide with the next layer 3, the next 2, and 1 on top. I place the hickory lumps - depending on size - about 6 inches apart. I light about a dozen coals in my charcoal chimney and get them glowing red hot with the white outer ash shell. I then pour these hot coals on one end of the ring of briquettes, place the top cover on the grill and let it heat up to about 300° F. I place the meat - sometimes 2 cuts at once - on the grill and replace the cover. I monitor temps in the grill with the thermometer built into the handle. It will drop fairly quickly as the meat cools the fire and begins to absorb the heat. I adjust the vents shooting to achieve a temperature of 250° F throughout the process. It will vary up and down; so it's important to check every quarter hour or so at the beginning and at least hourly after you reach target temperature at the start. Usually, I don't even bother to check temperature for 8 or 9 hours. Then I use a good quick reading probe thermometer (Thermopop from Thermoworks) to get a read on the internal temperature. Sometimes I experience the classic stall when internal temps won't rise much or at all for a prolonged period, but when it gets to 195° on the probe, I pull it; wrap it in foil; wrap it in heavy towels; and place it in a cooler. I don't like to pull it when its too hot; so I will sometimes let it sit for hours before pulling. I bag and vacuum seal 1lb. bags for the freezer. This process usually yields a little over half the uncooked weight in finished, bagged pork.

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  • Inexpensive DIY Under-Cabinet Lighting

    I had something like this in mind. The electrical outlet in the wall would have a motion detector with female outlet plugged into it and the inverter would be plugged into the motion detector and would power the LEDs.

    Thanks, again, Kris!!!I appreciate the links. I also like the idea of lighting the kickspace beneath cabinets. Great idea!

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  • Inexpensive DIY Under-Cabinet Lighting

    Howdy Kris!Thanks for the link to the LEDs. Can you suggest a brand of motion activated socket? Looking online I'm a bit confused. What I would prefer to do is to plug the motion detector outlet into an existed outlet on house wiring and then plug an inverter/supply into the motion detecting unit; thus LED lights I power with inverter/supply will come on only when there is motion in the kitchen.Again, thank you for really good information.!!!

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  • Cueball21 commented on andrew mcneil's instructable Yagi Antenna 5 8GHz4 months ago
    Yagi Antenna 5 8GHz

    Thank you for a great, informative video. Obviously, you are quite knowledgeable and quite skilled in the subject matter. With your excellent approach and outstanding video with very helpful narrative, I think I might give it a try. I want to boost my wifi 5 GHz signal and this little antenna will fit 'Er Indoors' idea of what is acceptable, maybe.Well done!!

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  • Cueball21 commented on SpecificLove's instructable 10 Places to Hide a Spare Key4 months ago
    10 Places to Hide a Spare Key

    Very well done!!Thank you!

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