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  • Remove rust easily and effectively with salt and electricity.

    This is old, but deserves a reply... You are simply wrong. If you use chlorides in the electrolyte mix, you will generate Cl2 gas at the anode. Just google salt-water electrolysis products if you don't believe. In fact, you can buy "chlorinators" that use this process to chlorinate your home swimming pool.With the small project shown here, the chlorine doesn't really present appreciable risk since the small volumes of gasses produced are easily dissipated. Nonetheless, washing soda is much better electrolyte.Your concerns about damaging the treated article are valid if you are talking about collector-quality restorations of rusty articles. In those cases the lowest possible voltage is generally used, allowing as much iron as possible to "reconvert" back to the ...see more »This is old, but deserves a reply... You are simply wrong. If you use chlorides in the electrolyte mix, you will generate Cl2 gas at the anode. Just google salt-water electrolysis products if you don't believe. In fact, you can buy "chlorinators" that use this process to chlorinate your home swimming pool.With the small project shown here, the chlorine doesn't really present appreciable risk since the small volumes of gasses produced are easily dissipated. Nonetheless, washing soda is much better electrolyte.Your concerns about damaging the treated article are valid if you are talking about collector-quality restorations of rusty articles. In those cases the lowest possible voltage is generally used, allowing as much iron as possible to "reconvert" back to the original surface. Higher voltages will, in essence, blast off the material that could otherwise have been reconverted. If you are't doing museum-quality conservation work, however, the higher voltages do work faster, and while you lose that small amount of material that wasn't reconverted, none of the base metal is lost, and that's what most of us are concerned about. Folks who restore old equipment use the higher voltages as standard practice.

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