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  • DebS76 commented on Jayefuu's instructable Gran's Green Tomato Chutney3 months ago
    Gran's Green Tomato Chutney

    I just finished making this and it is delicious: sweet, fruity, tangy and has a bit of heat from the pepper. I am a Brit who has lived in the USA for more than 20 years and I do a lot of preserving. Reading the comments that have been made previously, I think that I can provide a few pointers and insight.1) I can confirm that Sultanas are very similar to golden raisins and they do work well as replacements. White pepper is different (hotter) than the more commonly found black pepper but both will work.2) This recipe calls for malt vinegar and I've seen many people here suggesting changes. If you choose cider vinegar or white vinegar, the color of the finished product will be different and these vinegars have different taste profiles. I would be very hesitant to switch to balsamic vin...see more »I just finished making this and it is delicious: sweet, fruity, tangy and has a bit of heat from the pepper. I am a Brit who has lived in the USA for more than 20 years and I do a lot of preserving. Reading the comments that have been made previously, I think that I can provide a few pointers and insight.1) I can confirm that Sultanas are very similar to golden raisins and they do work well as replacements. White pepper is different (hotter) than the more commonly found black pepper but both will work.2) This recipe calls for malt vinegar and I've seen many people here suggesting changes. If you choose cider vinegar or white vinegar, the color of the finished product will be different and these vinegars have different taste profiles. I would be very hesitant to switch to balsamic vinegar because the sugar and acidity will be very different. Whichever vinegar you use, it should be 5% acidity to ensure that the pH of the chutney will be raised sufficiently to kill/ reduce bacteria growth.3) Changes to the type of sugar will impact the product flavor and color. If you are in the USA, sugar beet is often sold instead of cane sugar and this has been shown to greatly impact flavor, crystallization, etc. look for pure cane sugar. You should not reduce the sugar or replace some of the sugar with an artificial sweetener because the sugar is a preservative and making any changes to the formula will impact shelf life.4) British teaspoons are smaller than US teaspoons. The gram weights given for the salt and the pepper seem off and I would probably use 15 grams of white pepper rather than the 20 grams stated in the listed ingredients. 20 grams might well work with black pepper, if you want some heat to the finished product.5) This is an old recipe, created before concern was raised about botulism, yeasts and mold in food. In the USA, it is recommended that only tested recipes are used and that foods are properly sealed for storage; things still seem more lax in England. If you have any family members who are immune-compromised, you may wish to sterilize and can the chutney. Tested chutney recipes are available from Ball, Kilner and the US government. To properly can this chutney, you will need a water bath canner and canning jars with two piece caps. Half fill a water bath canner with water and 1/4 cup of white vinegar, submerge clean canning jars in the water and the water up to 180 degrees Farenheit. The jars should be held at this temperature for 10 minutes to sterilize the jars and ensure that they will not break when filled with the hot chutney. A separate pan should be filled with 180 degree water and the sealing lids submerged in it for 10 minutes prior to use to soften the sealing compound. Remove one jar at a time and fill to 1/2 inch from the rim. Take a toothpick or jar filler tool and run it around the inside edge of the jar to remove any air bubbles. Wipe the rim of the jar with a clean, damp dish cloth then remove a lid from the pan of water and place it on the top of the jar. Screw on the cap, finger tip tight and place it on a towel until all the jars have been filled. Lower the filled jars into the water bath canner and ensure that the jar tops are covered with 1-2 inches of water. Out the lid of the canner, increase the heat to medium high and bring the water to a rolling boil. Once a rolling boil has been reached, keep boiling the jars for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, turn off the heat, take off the canner lid and let the jars sit in the hot water for 5 minutes. Remove the jars to a towel-covered surface and leave for 12-24 hours, until cold. The lids may make popping noises while in the canner or on the counter as a vacuum is created in the jars and the lids set. Remove the screw band and check for a good seal by seeing if the center of the lid will pop up and down. If the lid moves, the seal didn't take and the product should be refrigerated and consumed within a few weeks. Sealed jars can be stored in a dark, cool place for usually up to 12 months. Check that the jar is still sealed before attempting to eat the product and discard any where the seal has broken or the contents are moldy/smell strange.I hope this helps.

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