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2Instructables23,228Views13CommentsOrlando Joined October 20th, 2016
Valencia Horticulture graduate, master tinker of all things, and madd scientist.

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  • Demosouthpaw commented on Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Vertical Window Garden 11 months ago
    DIY Vertical Window Garden

    Hello Mr. Davethanks for your compliments, now I am going to attempt to answer your question in my highest capacity.1). My thoughts on colored glass, and if red or blue would effect overall growth.Well great question, photosynthesis is the process of the plant converting sunlight along with CO2 into food or energy for itself. A photon of light exitates a chlorophyll pigment. There are a few different kinds of chlorophyll, and despite of what most people think they are not all green. Take carotenoids they are responsible for the color given to carrots and tomato's, asides from nutritional value they also help absorb sunlight. With that being said I personally believe filtering light WILL NOT help the plant in any way. Plants are evolved to absorb the light that they require via chl...

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    Hello Mr. Davethanks for your compliments, now I am going to attempt to answer your question in my highest capacity.1). My thoughts on colored glass, and if red or blue would effect overall growth.Well great question, photosynthesis is the process of the plant converting sunlight along with CO2 into food or energy for itself. A photon of light exitates a chlorophyll pigment. There are a few different kinds of chlorophyll, and despite of what most people think they are not all green. Take carotenoids they are responsible for the color given to carrots and tomato's, asides from nutritional value they also help absorb sunlight. With that being said I personally believe filtering light WILL NOT help the plant in any way. Plants are evolved to absorb the light that they require via chlorophyll. Changing the light spectrums that they receive will limit your yields and can even effect the quality of your plant. 2). Reflective material to capture more light.Yes! and double yes! As long as you don't cook then alive haha. Maximizing reflective light will ensure that it is not absorbed by your rug or whatever else the light passes through. If you notice most if not all grow light will have a reflective cover under the lights to maximize light. Aluminum foil works wonders.To sum it up, personally I don't think at this level light should be filtered ex; red, blue spectrum. Plants have evolved clever ways to deal with absorbing the spectrums that work for them. Heck yes on the reflective tape, or paper just careful not to bake them.Hope this helps!

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  • Demosouthpaw commented on Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Tomato Window Garden11 months ago
    DIY Tomato Window Garden

    Good morning,well when compared to growing in the ground, container growing will have its set backs and yield less fruit. However from experience I have found cherry and small varieties work best. The real issue that I have faced is maintaining single stalk, as you know once those suckers start to grow it's an on going battle to pinch them. You can hope to yield about 2-10lbs of fruit per plant.

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  • Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Tomato Window Garden's weekly stats: 11 months ago
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  • Demosouthpaw commented on Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Vertical Window Garden 11 months ago
    DIY Vertical Window Garden

    My original window garden was made with sprite bottles, and those bottles are green. As for light spectrum and stuff, plants absorb red and blue, and reflect green. Hence the green we see off of their leaves. Personally I like the color green so the sprite bottles are my favorite.

    Hello,I can see why you would say that, of course two factors are at play here, regardless of were your plant is located (inside or out) if Fusarium is present the fungi will spread via spores, this can be transported by wind, splashing of water, dirty tools, ect. F spp. tends to overwinter in soils and can survive in plant debris or tools almost indefinitely. As you might know F spp. effects many vegetables and flowering plants, with that being said, a major part of gardening, and actually being successful at it, is implementing good cultural practices. Proper pruning, cleaning, and managing plant debris WILL prevent most plant pathogens.Also making sure you buy seeds, plugs, and soils from reputable dealers will also limit disease incidence.Thanks for your comment I hope this clea...

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    Hello,I can see why you would say that, of course two factors are at play here, regardless of were your plant is located (inside or out) if Fusarium is present the fungi will spread via spores, this can be transported by wind, splashing of water, dirty tools, ect. F spp. tends to overwinter in soils and can survive in plant debris or tools almost indefinitely. As you might know F spp. effects many vegetables and flowering plants, with that being said, a major part of gardening, and actually being successful at it, is implementing good cultural practices. Proper pruning, cleaning, and managing plant debris WILL prevent most plant pathogens.Also making sure you buy seeds, plugs, and soils from reputable dealers will also limit disease incidence.Thanks for your comment I hope this cleared up some of the misconceptions you had about Fusarium and this particular system. -Happy growing mate!

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  • Demosouthpaw commented on tekeem's instructable Portal 2 themed Virtual reality room12 months ago
  • Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Vertical Window Garden 's weekly stats: 12 months ago
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  • Demosouthpaw commented on Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Vertical Window Garden 12 months ago
    DIY Vertical Window Garden

    Thank you for your kind words, I'm finishing up my potato build soon. It's along the lines of the same concept

    Great job! Looks good

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  • Demosouthpaw commented on Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Vertical Window Garden 12 months ago
    DIY Vertical Window Garden

    You're welcome I'm glad you like it!

    Hey Udon,For fertilizer it again depends on the type of plant you're growing. For example tomatoes will require more phosphorus and potassium, along with others such as iron, boron, manganese ect. That's not to say you absolutely need need to fertilize your plants. But fertilizing does increase quality of your yields.For fruiting varieties I recommend a 10-10-10, usually they come in a water soluble powder and have other nutrients such as iron and magnesium. Again I've grown fruit and herbs and never fertilized, the nutrients in the soil are enough to push it through, provided you have some decent potting soil. Hope this helps

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  • Demosouthpaw commented on Demosouthpaw's instructable DIY Vertical Window Garden 12 months ago
    DIY Vertical Window Garden

    The answer to your question is, it's not so much what you can grow, but how much yield you can get from your crop. In practice all plants will grow given light, media, and water, but what will determine quality fruit or yields is contingent on multiple factors. With this exact build I have gotten great results with lettuce, and herbs. My cherry tomato does okay but not as great as it would in the ground. And strawberries do okay too. Self pollinating cultivars are the way to go, that way you don't have to sit there with a tooth pick and pollinate your self (very tedious). I'm experimenting with a different build aimed at growing potatoes. If my yield are good then I will be doing a write up on, potatoes, onions, and garlic window gardens.I hope I answers your question -happy grow...

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    The answer to your question is, it's not so much what you can grow, but how much yield you can get from your crop. In practice all plants will grow given light, media, and water, but what will determine quality fruit or yields is contingent on multiple factors. With this exact build I have gotten great results with lettuce, and herbs. My cherry tomato does okay but not as great as it would in the ground. And strawberries do okay too. Self pollinating cultivars are the way to go, that way you don't have to sit there with a tooth pick and pollinate your self (very tedious). I'm experimenting with a different build aimed at growing potatoes. If my yield are good then I will be doing a write up on, potatoes, onions, and garlic window gardens.I hope I answers your question -happy growing!

    Interesting, interesting. I like the idea of making a reservoir if I had the space I probably would have gone that route. As for the worm tea, I'm a big inorganic guy lol. usually organics require an input to be made into a plant Soluble form, growing indoors limit the effectiveness of organics. NH4+ for the win lol.

    Thank you, thank you very much. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

    pretty much anything, now the question is what do you think your yields will be like? That depends of many factors, available light, nutrients, and water. The bottles are rather large I would say you can have decent results with cherry tomato and other small variety vegetables and fruit. Go for self pollinating cultivars or varieties that don't require pollination. In my garden I have cherry tomato growing from on column, Lettuce from another, and various herbs I use for tea in the third. I am also experimenting with a different build to grow potatoes, if it proves worthy I will do a write up on that as well. Happy growing!

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