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  • Dr_Acula commented on Dr_Acula's instructable Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh8 months ago
    Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh

    Sensors are outside the tank. Tank => tap => T piece and put a blank end in the T. I use 4mm black garden hose and barbed connector eg the one at the top of the page http://www.irrigationwarehouse.com.au/category243_1.htm and trim the barb off one side with knife, then drill a 4mm hole in the blank that goes into the T and glue it in with araldite. There probably is another way to go from 4mm pipe up to (say) 40 to 50mm that is on a tank. The 4mm garden pipe fits nicely on the MPX5050 sensors. Other sensors - LDRs, LM35 temp sensors for the pool, the pulse output of a 3 phase power meter (to measure solar power). Anything that can convert to 0 to 5V

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  • Dr_Acula commented on Dr_Acula's instructable Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh8 months ago
    Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh

    Hi Stan. Looks like something to check out. I've had this running for 18 months now and it seems pretty reliable. At the moment the data hops about five times to get from the top of a hill, then through a valley, then some trees. So if can do it in one hop would certainly make things easier! I'll go check it out :)

    Hi Scios, sorry about the delay replying. Re different radio modules, see Manuka's comment from yesterday. He is a guru when it comes to radio links and always has access to the best modules, as he mentions, LoRa. I'm pretty happy with the APC220 modules, as I like the idea of multiple data paths for a true mesh, so one node can go offline (eg when a koala chews the power wire, and yes, that seriously did happen!). Thingspeak lets you log in once you have a pile of data and change the type of graph, averaging and other parameters. Two catches on an arduino. First, stick a small heatsink on the ethernet chip, and second, it sometimes doesn't reset when the power is cycled so I brought out the reset button to a big button on the front of the box. Transducers - farnell or radiospares, MPX5...

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    Hi Scios, sorry about the delay replying. Re different radio modules, see Manuka's comment from yesterday. He is a guru when it comes to radio links and always has access to the best modules, as he mentions, LoRa. I'm pretty happy with the APC220 modules, as I like the idea of multiple data paths for a true mesh, so one node can go offline (eg when a koala chews the power wire, and yes, that seriously did happen!). Thingspeak lets you log in once you have a pile of data and change the type of graph, averaging and other parameters. Two catches on an arduino. First, stick a small heatsink on the ethernet chip, and second, it sometimes doesn't reset when the power is cycled so I brought out the reset button to a big button on the front of the box. Transducers - farnell or radiospares, MPX5050 which is 5V = 5metres, and MPX5500 which is 5V = 50 metres. I've been running these transducers for years, much more reliable than float switches (spiders go and build nests in the float switch mechanism).

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  • Dr_Acula commented on Dr_Acula's instructable Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh9 months ago
    Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh

    Hi Scios, your message from 17/2 appeared on my email feed but it isn't coming up on this comment page - something not working at Instructables. Maybe send me an email moxhamj@internode.on.net

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  • Dr_Acula commented on Dr_Acula's instructable Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh9 months ago
    Simple Arduino Wireless Mesh

    Very much so! The wireless data has to go over a hill and through trees so no direct line of sight. Could have used high power radio, but with low power and short range and multiple hops there is no interference to the neighbours. Data used to go to xively but they are subscription, so instead goes to Thingspeak. Data is here http://www.smarthome.jigsy.com/ Some minor tweaks to the software along the way, now have 32 nodes instead of 16, and also every node has a display - this uses more power, but it makes debugging a lot easier. I like to see each node talking to at least two others, so there are multiple data paths and the system then can handle a few nodes not working.

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