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  • Drako84 commented on Drako84's instructable Homemade Well Tuned Pan Flute5 days ago
    Homemade Well Tuned Pan Flute

    Hi! I used aluminum instead of copper because it was easier to find the diameter I needed, plus it's lighter than copper so the flute will be lighter too. Anyway, you can use any material you wish, the only difference will be in the timbre (the kind of sound the instrument makes). Regarding the formula, you can just click on it and it will open full-size.Speaking of the formulas, there are a total of four symbols: the lenght of the pipe L, the speed of sound v, the frequency of the note produced f, and the distance of the note from the central A n, measured in half-tones. The first formula L=v/(4f) can be used to determine the length of the pipe considering the speed of sound in air and the frequency of the note you with to produce. Since the notes are usually called by name, not by fre...

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    Hi! I used aluminum instead of copper because it was easier to find the diameter I needed, plus it's lighter than copper so the flute will be lighter too. Anyway, you can use any material you wish, the only difference will be in the timbre (the kind of sound the instrument makes). Regarding the formula, you can just click on it and it will open full-size.Speaking of the formulas, there are a total of four symbols: the lenght of the pipe L, the speed of sound v, the frequency of the note produced f, and the distance of the note from the central A n, measured in half-tones. The first formula L=v/(4f) can be used to determine the length of the pipe considering the speed of sound in air and the frequency of the note you with to produce. Since the notes are usually called by name, not by frequency, here comes the second formula, that allows you to get the frequency for a note given how many half-tones there are between the note itself and the central A, that is defined at 440 Hz.Hope this help, feel free to ask more!

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  • Drako84 commented on Drako84's instructable Homemade well tuned pan flute1 year ago
    Homemade well tuned pan flute

    Honestly, I don't understand why you need to know my name...However, I suppose you're asking for the sources of information about the data and the formulas used. As I clearly state, my main sources are Wikipedia, Google and an old textbook of physics that I used when I was in high school (since then I've sold the textbook, and I don't remember the title; I'm italian, and so it was the book).There is something I'm missing? Because for as long as I can think about, I don't seem to find a reason to give you my name.

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  • Drako84 commented on Drako84's instructable Homemade well tuned pan flute1 year ago
    Homemade well tuned pan flute

    Actually, the speed of sound should be in m/s, and the resulting length is in meters, so 0.15 m = 15 cm, as expected.The formula works for any kind of units system, as long as you keep them consistent for all your calculation; replacing each variable with its unit you can easily see that fact:1. [meters] = [meters/second]/[1/second]2. [centimeters] = [centimeters/second]/[1/second]3. [yards] = [yards/second]/[1/second]4. [inches] = [inches/second]/[1/second]and so on...

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  • Drako84 commented on Drako84's instructable Homemade well tuned pan flute2 years ago
    Homemade well tuned pan flute

    Hi! The diameter of the pipes will not interfere with the frequency: as you can see, the frequency f is related only to the speed of sound v and the pipe length l.If you know the frequencies you need you can just plug those values into the formula along with the speed of sound, and you'll have all the length you need.You can also use the spreadsheet I've prepared that will make al calculation for you. You can reach it from the last step.Regards!

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