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  • Electronerd commented on geotek's instructable Harvesting Electronic Components4 months ago
    Harvesting Electronic Components

    Critical advice is to do this work in open air, preferably in a light cross- breeze. Gloves and gkasses are a great idea. The fumes coming off include burning phenolic, plasticizers, and lead fumes from the solder. All these are a severe health risk. Working outdoors might be a hassle in winter in a lot of places. A safe way to do it indoors would be to use a fume cupboard, as used in scientific labs. (Not a trivial project...)Anyone out there built one?

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  • The Universal Multipurpose Workbench

    Hi Nice bench! I got a great hint from an old woodwork teacher, when I asked how high to build a bench top. The trick is to stand up straight, with your arms by your side, and elbows bent double. The finished benchtop height should be 100 mm below the point of your elbow. I built my last bench that way, and it's been the most comfortable one ever.I do mostly electronics, and only a little carpentry.My metalworking vise clamps onto the bench top, so when I don't need it, I unscrew it & it's not in my way. It's only a 100mm size, - cast iron/ forged jaws. Your need may vary.Re benchtop protection: Agree with the 2-part epoxy resin finish. I once renovated an old woodwork bench surface that had several million small holes drilled into it by about 3 generations of carpentry apprentices...

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    Hi Nice bench! I got a great hint from an old woodwork teacher, when I asked how high to build a bench top. The trick is to stand up straight, with your arms by your side, and elbows bent double. The finished benchtop height should be 100 mm below the point of your elbow. I built my last bench that way, and it's been the most comfortable one ever.I do mostly electronics, and only a little carpentry.My metalworking vise clamps onto the bench top, so when I don't need it, I unscrew it & it's not in my way. It's only a 100mm size, - cast iron/ forged jaws. Your need may vary.Re benchtop protection: Agree with the 2-part epoxy resin finish. I once renovated an old woodwork bench surface that had several million small holes drilled into it by about 3 generations of carpentry apprentices. I mixed up the resin, poured it on and leveled off. (Hint: Wear gloves, old clothes, use newspaper on the floor and have *lots* of ventilation!!) My bench has an illiuminated angle-poise magnifier clamped to one end of the benchtop, which is great for fine work. You can't have too many power outlets. I mounted lots of powerboards on a wooden rail, fixed along the back of my bench top. This gives me a mains power outlet every few centimetres. Below the mains power outlets is a row of 12V DC heavy duty screw terminals. These have banana plug holes in the front, for quick connection. Colour coded in red/black pairs of course. Master switch and 80A cartridge fuse at one end. The 12 V wiring behind the wooden support is rated at 100A and was salvaged from a demolished electrical installation. All connected to a 12V, 36AH gel cell, float charged off a 13.6V regulated supply. Oh yeah. Did I mention the dry powder fire extinguisher mounted just inside the workshop door? Had one there for 10 years, but never needed it :) Congratulations on a great instructible. Your solid construction technique and heavy materials are the way to go. The horizontal support rails under the top are critical for sturdiness. Well done!

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  • How to Make an Arduino Powered CNC Machine

    The design, construction and quality of the machine and instructable are truly excellent. Great job.

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  • Electronerd commented on JRV31's instructable 555 Timer emulator for Arduino1 year ago
    555 Timer emulator for Arduino

    Looks like a good educational project I have used 555 chips regularly since they first appeared on the market, and am pretty familiar with them. One thing occurred to me: What about a version, on the Arduino, where the component types and values are simply programmed in software, and thus don't have to exist as solid objects. You select the type of circuit, enter the values of the R + C components, and use either an external pin or software trigger as the source signal. If you are feeling really energetic, what about a pSpice version? :)CheersDOne thing occurred to me:

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  • Electronerd followed Photography, Tools, Reuse, LEDs and 19 others channel 1 year ago