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6CommentsJoined January 8th, 2017

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  • Ferntoe commented on FernMakes's instructable DIY Light Bulb Bugs1 week ago
    DIY Light Bulb Bugs

    Thank you! I'm into jewelry, but you've broken this down to look entirely doable. This may solve my beads in tubes, but because the tubes are funky plastic, I throw away. I try to recycle and your instructions fit the bill! One may perhaps call them Blooming Lumen.

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  • Ferntoe commented on neta soreq's instructable Spring heel shoes - 3D print1 month ago
    Spring heel shoes - 3D print

    Beanie...I was just wondering if you were aware of "chinese foot binding" as I could not find a reference to the '72 article. I'm into PanAsian studies and love getting new references! The shoes are the most curious item I have seen. No doubt there will be a period of adjustment and back to the drawing board sessions, but just the design alone, wow! Best to you!

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  • Ferntoe commented on neta soreq's instructable Spring heel shoes - 3D print1 month ago
    Spring heel shoes - 3D print

    Flexibility is a must. And, you are leaving the dinosaurs of shoe making in the past. With wobbly ankle syndrome (wonkers), I can only look and smile. The beginning of shoes was meant to elevate the foot/feet above non-paved road (horse poo etc.) and the second reason? Keeps the woman in her "place", look at Chinese foot binding. How's the sweat factor? Could you find something that once formed would have that in place?

    I couldn't find the article in the ether; so, is this about footbinding? Take a look for that and how the foot was changed to fit the shoe. Eyow! The perfect bound foot was no bigger than a small teacup. This guaranteed the woman a prosperous marriage. Dig a bit deeper and learn how they bound, cut and crushed the foot. Revolting smell as well. Best to you,

    Creating one-off shoes would be smashing. From years of martial arts, dance and genetics, a one foot size does not work. I have odd-ball sneakers because one leg is a tad higher than the other leg. At my age, I can't afford a fractured hip. Or, ankle!

    Neta, this is fabulous! You nailed down all the anatomical parameters. I've worked 40 years as a med. transcriptionist, your approach and details are spot on! You have taken the time to address the person, their physiology and structure. I can no longer wear heels having broken both feet and have prosthetic knees, but these shoes are intriguing. Patent your design! Please! I would say you could go to a physical therapy group (the doctor) and I have no doubt you would have a whiz-bang collaboration. Best to you! Anne

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