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  • How and When to Water Your Houseplants

    How much water a plant needs is a complex matter. It depends on how much sun the plant gets, what the average temperature is, the kind of plant, what kind of pot it has, how large or how small the plant and the pot are, and of course, the kind of plant. It even matters how you water the plant. Some cacti for example will die if you regularly water them by putting water in the tray and letting the soil suck it up from the bottom - they absolutely need to be watered from the top. Tillandsia needs dry soil and you have to water it so that small pools form at the base of the leafs - but only once in a while, so as the pools not to completely dry out. If you only water the soil, they will wrap up all their leaves into a green stick, and not do much vegetation. Lithops need watering only six ...

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    How much water a plant needs is a complex matter. It depends on how much sun the plant gets, what the average temperature is, the kind of plant, what kind of pot it has, how large or how small the plant and the pot are, and of course, the kind of plant. It even matters how you water the plant. Some cacti for example will die if you regularly water them by putting water in the tray and letting the soil suck it up from the bottom - they absolutely need to be watered from the top. Tillandsia needs dry soil and you have to water it so that small pools form at the base of the leafs - but only once in a while, so as the pools not to completely dry out. If you only water the soil, they will wrap up all their leaves into a green stick, and not do much vegetation. Lithops need watering only six months of the year - spring and end of summer to early autumn. Water them once in winter and they will die.Tools don't tell you much unless you correlate that with all the other factors. Best thing to do is find some caring instructions, stick to them for a while, then experiment by slightly varying the watering process - just slightly, and slowly, to have enough time to observe the effect of the changes on the plant. Each plant has different preferences, even plants of the same kind may like different watering. There's no one size fits all.

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  • Cyclonic Separator Shop-Vac With Secondary Water Filtration (Wet Scrubber) Made From Junk.. This Is Version Mark 2 of the Cyclonic Dust Collector Shop-Vac.

    I initially wanted to do something similar, but gave up. This build will clean the exit air very well, but will also evaporate a lot of water - not something you want in a wood working shop.

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  • FlorinJ commented on bryans workshop's instructable How to Make Mosaic Rock Pavers!5 weeks ago
    How to Make Mosaic Rock Pavers!

    At that size, I'd add in some wire mesh as reinforcement, to prevent cracking, in case a car wheel incidentally rolls across the middle of the tile, for example. Two layers, one maybe half an inch beneath/atop the stones, one another inch farther, with a total two inches thickness of the paver, I'd say.I'd also trim the trays at the same height, and instead of just smoothing it with the trowel I'd shave off the excess with a board, to ensure all pavers are exactly the same height - laying pavers of different height is a pain. And I would make sure the walls of my trays are strictly perpendicular to the bottom, not slanted - If I want a slant of the sides at all I want it so the upper edges stick out, not the bottom. If the bottom sticks out, I'll have ugly visible empty spaces between t...

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    At that size, I'd add in some wire mesh as reinforcement, to prevent cracking, in case a car wheel incidentally rolls across the middle of the tile, for example. Two layers, one maybe half an inch beneath/atop the stones, one another inch farther, with a total two inches thickness of the paver, I'd say.I'd also trim the trays at the same height, and instead of just smoothing it with the trowel I'd shave off the excess with a board, to ensure all pavers are exactly the same height - laying pavers of different height is a pain. And I would make sure the walls of my trays are strictly perpendicular to the bottom, not slanted - If I want a slant of the sides at all I want it so the upper edges stick out, not the bottom. If the bottom sticks out, I'll have ugly visible empty spaces between the pavers.

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  • How to Choose the Right Pot or Planter for a Plant

    There's also other disadvantages to plastic pots: they don't breed, i.e. there's no air flow through the pot walls, and what little substances they leech into the soil, while not outright harming the plant, has a slightly detrimental effect on the bacteria in the soil.Glazed ceramic pots also don't breed, but at least don't leech anything. The water being absorbed into the pot walls of ceramic pots can affect the integrity of the pot, causing the glaze to crumble and fall off, especially if the pot is left out to freeze when wet.Not all pots sold as terracotta are equal. Some of the lower quality ones, oftentimes painted or glazed ones, or pots without the typical terracotta color, are often prone to being heavily infested by algae or crack and crumble, after a few years of seasonal cha...

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    There's also other disadvantages to plastic pots: they don't breed, i.e. there's no air flow through the pot walls, and what little substances they leech into the soil, while not outright harming the plant, has a slightly detrimental effect on the bacteria in the soil.Glazed ceramic pots also don't breed, but at least don't leech anything. The water being absorbed into the pot walls of ceramic pots can affect the integrity of the pot, causing the glaze to crumble and fall off, especially if the pot is left out to freeze when wet.Not all pots sold as terracotta are equal. Some of the lower quality ones, oftentimes painted or glazed ones, or pots without the typical terracotta color, are often prone to being heavily infested by algae or crack and crumble, after a few years of seasonal changes.This being said, most pots will do well for many years if not left outside in the winter and not exposed to direct sunlight during the summer.

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  • FlorinJ commented on aglepetsos01's instructable Homemade Pontoon Boat8 weeks ago
    Homemade Pontoon Boat

    That will only make them rust later. But not very much later. Plus, you don't need much surface rust for a strap to break - and surface rust is what the nickel or chrome layer protects from. Rust in depth in a microscopic crack, or along a scratch caused by rubbing against pebbles or left behind by a screw driver, which is even more likely to develop under stress, can result in an unexpectedly broken strap.What you can look for: oftentimes, ware on pallets is strapped in place with a sort of woven and then impregnated synthetic straps. Boxes of fridges, cooking stoves, cloth washers or similar are also tied with such straps. These are never reused. You should be able to get tons of them for free from bigger stores, or any kind of shop that gets things delivered in bulk. That thing is so...

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    That will only make them rust later. But not very much later. Plus, you don't need much surface rust for a strap to break - and surface rust is what the nickel or chrome layer protects from. Rust in depth in a microscopic crack, or along a scratch caused by rubbing against pebbles or left behind by a screw driver, which is even more likely to develop under stress, can result in an unexpectedly broken strap.What you can look for: oftentimes, ware on pallets is strapped in place with a sort of woven and then impregnated synthetic straps. Boxes of fridges, cooking stoves, cloth washers or similar are also tied with such straps. These are never reused. You should be able to get tons of them for free from bigger stores, or any kind of shop that gets things delivered in bulk. That thing is so strong and wear resistant that I've heard of people splitting it into strands then braid it into bow strings.

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  • FlorinJ commented on aglepetsos01's instructable Homemade Pontoon Boat2 months ago
    Homemade Pontoon Boat

    Be prepared to replace the metallic hanger straps often. Would be nice to replace them with something plastic, less prone to corrosion.

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  • Preserve the Beauty of Raw or Rusted Steel & Iron Surfaces

    You can also change the gloss level with very fine steel wool. Pass over the table in many different directions, without pressing too hard. The microscopic scratches left behind will not be enough to damage the coating, or to make it non-transparent, but will take away the gloss.

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  • Dip Dyed Coffee Filter Paper Flower Wreath

    I doubt you're allergic to every part of the flower. You're most likely allergic to pollen and other kinds of fine dust. You can try to grow green plants, which don't bloom. They're nice too. And some are also highly decorative.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Creativity Buzz's instructable Ice Cream Machine2 months ago
    Ice Cream Machine

    Try operating the drill at lower rotation speeds - there's no need for the high speed.In order to make the ice cream taste better, add some heavy cream and beat an egg yolk or two into the mix, plus some vanilla flavoring. Heat everything for a few minutes - but careful, so that it should not boil, or the egg yolk will curdle. (In case you have a kitchen thermometer: theory says 70 something degrees Celsius, if you keep it at 70 +/- 1 it's good enough.) Let it cool, and only then make the ice cream.Alternatively, you can prepare only about 1/2, 2/3 or 3/4 of the quantity (without the vanilla flavoring), let it cool, and then mix some mashed, strongly flavored fruit into it - very ripe mango, ripe strawberries, raspberries or passion fruit. Pass the pulp through a strainer, for fruit wit...

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    Try operating the drill at lower rotation speeds - there's no need for the high speed.In order to make the ice cream taste better, add some heavy cream and beat an egg yolk or two into the mix, plus some vanilla flavoring. Heat everything for a few minutes - but careful, so that it should not boil, or the egg yolk will curdle. (In case you have a kitchen thermometer: theory says 70 something degrees Celsius, if you keep it at 70 +/- 1 it's good enough.) Let it cool, and only then make the ice cream.Alternatively, you can prepare only about 1/2, 2/3 or 3/4 of the quantity (without the vanilla flavoring), let it cool, and then mix some mashed, strongly flavored fruit into it - very ripe mango, ripe strawberries, raspberries or passion fruit. Pass the pulp through a strainer, for fruit with seeds, such as strawberries or raspberries - they're ruining the ice cream's texture otherwise. If you add fruit, also add the juice of half a lemon - it makes the fruit flavor come out stronger. Boiling or even heating the fruit is damaging to the flavor, therefore don't add it while the mix is still hot. You'll have to experiment with proportions to get what you like best in creaminess and flavor.(I am a sucker for flavor, so it's worth the additional effort to me.)

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  • FlorinJ commented on stillash's instructable Natural Beeswax Wood Polish 2 months ago
    Natural Beeswax Wood Polish

    It does, but only partially, and you have to redo it periodically.The wax goes into the wood pores, but doesn't seal the wood completely. If something wet, like red wine or blueberry juice, isn't cleaned quickly, it goes deep into the wood and stains it permanently. If something less fluid, like ash or charcoal, falls onto the wood, it doesn't go deep into the pores, can be cleaned off by rubbing the wood thoroughly, and then the waxing can be redone. Without the wax, even cocoa powder would get a hold onto wood, making it close to impossible to clean.I use beeswax un-mixed with oil to once in a blue moon (that's maybe every five of seven years) redo a wooden board I use for kneading dough - I repeatedly heat it with a heat gun and rub it in. Without the wax, dough sticks quite easily t...

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    It does, but only partially, and you have to redo it periodically.The wax goes into the wood pores, but doesn't seal the wood completely. If something wet, like red wine or blueberry juice, isn't cleaned quickly, it goes deep into the wood and stains it permanently. If something less fluid, like ash or charcoal, falls onto the wood, it doesn't go deep into the pores, can be cleaned off by rubbing the wood thoroughly, and then the waxing can be redone. Without the wax, even cocoa powder would get a hold onto wood, making it close to impossible to clean.I use beeswax un-mixed with oil to once in a blue moon (that's maybe every five of seven years) redo a wooden board I use for kneading dough - I repeatedly heat it with a heat gun and rub it in. Without the wax, dough sticks quite easily to the board. With the wax, it has to be really-really sticky to stick. Even then, it's rather easy to rub off. However, I don't much care about stains on that board, nor does it usually get in touch with staining things. The occasional re-waxing keeps the wood's look fresh, as if it was just sawn.

    Yeawrs ago, I recall boiling small pieces in wax in order to stabilize them. They were pretty much as stable as vacuum-epoxy-soaked wood after half an hour of boiling. I used this for very simple and plain knife handles (but with a very good grip) and small pulleys.

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  • FlorinJ commented on tomatoskins's instructable Hot Pipe Wood Bending4 months ago
    Hot Pipe Wood Bending

    Never had much success with a DIY steambox. Definitely will give this a try - just today I needed to bend two 1/5" sticks for a napkin holder, and I'll need several slightly bent ~1/6" strips for the legs of a side table in the near future.

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  • FlorinJ commented on tomatoskins's instructable 20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools4 months ago
    20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools

    I'm still convinced that in DYI-ers' workshops a hand drill is more common than a metal lathe.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Mrballeng's instructable Candle Polish Wood4 months ago
    Candle Polish Wood

    I did this to a wooden kneading board, but instead of using paper towels for rubbing I used very coarse sackcloth, which I also switched often. I also used pure beeswax (had a bee keeping granddad, and kept myself a few families, several years ago). In the end, the wood looked like it hadn't received any treatment, but no water would stick to it - and almost no dough. You need to redo the finish every few years, though (at least if you actually use the board). I wouldn't recommend it for surfaces coming into contact with hot objects - that would damage the wax layer way faster (it only goes fractions of a millimeter into the wood, and is therefore easily melted and damaged by hot objects).

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  • FlorinJ commented on tomatoskins's instructable 20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools4 months ago
    20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools

    I've tried the clamps made of PVC tube rings. They're extremely weak. Either you use many-many-many of them to clamp a single small piece, or you use them on jobs where you don't need much pressure. White or yellow carpenter's glue, for example, needs more pressure than these clamps can delivery. On a job where I used a silicone-like adhesive, and only needed to keep the pieces in place until the glue cured, they were quite useful - I needed many times more clamps than I have F and C clamps.

    I've used a regular hand drill to drill on its lowest speed to drill holes in glass. The only thing you need to do is drill under water, and at the lowest speed. You don't find a metal lathe in any workshop, you usually do find a hand drill or electric screw driver, that's why I'm saying.

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  • FlorinJ commented on monickingbird's instructable Concrete Octagonal Driveway Pavers4 months ago
    Concrete Octagonal Driveway Pavers

    In spite of what previous commenters say, I wouldn't use anything greasy for easing demolding. Cement in water yields a caustic solution, which in turn dissolves fat, or even forms soap-like compounds. You don't want the caustic substances dissolved in the water which is contained by the concrete mix to be diverted from their hardening role. Rather, I'd lacquer or wax the molds - lacquer or wax are chemically inert, or at least don't interact chemically with the concrete mix. Of course, the oil won't penetrate deep into the concrete, to make the pavers completely fragile, but it will affect the surface that's in contact with the mold. Even if it looks OK initially, it will wear easier than if no oil was used, down to maybe a fraction of a millimeter.

    That plastic does not allow water to run out of the poured concrete is actually a good thing - and you should stick with plastic. Curing is not drying, it's a chemical reaction which consumes water. If water leeches out of your poured concrete, it takes chemicals which are needed for the concrete to harden with it.

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  • How to Sharpen Used and Dull Drill Bits (By Hand!!)

    Carbon steel, at least, gets into the range of tempering temperatures before it starts to glow. As soon as it turns blue, you're in the danger zone - there's a range of temperatures, above the blue temperature, where it becomes gray again, and in that range you can't really tell if it's acceptably cool or too hot to keep its hardness.

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  • How to Sharpen Used and Dull Drill Bits (By Hand!!)

    To my knowledge, rapid steels are quenched and tempered at temperatures in the range of 400 to 700 degrees Celsius. When the metal gets bright red from grinding, it's well above those temperatures. It may not get as soft as a plain carbon steel when cooling, but it will for sure no longer be very hard.Many woodworking drill bits, especially larger ones, are indeed carbon steel, since they're not needed to withstand temperatures too high - wood smokes well below 400 degrees Celsius, and you don't want burn marks in your holes. Carbon steel becomes soft at even lower temperatures.

    As a trained toolmaker, maybe you could answer this question: is sharpening a dull drill bit on a bench grinder OK? Doesn't the bit easily overheat and loose hardness, turning it useless?

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  • FlorinJ commented on Olivier Iserbyt's instructable USB Foam Cutter (PVC) - Hot Wire5 months ago
    USB Foam Cutter (PVC) - Hot Wire

    Actually, it seems that stainless steel and nichrome have comparable resistivity: https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/resistivity-conductivity-d_418.html. Surprises me too. I would have expected stainless steel to be a pretty bad conductor, but not that bad.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Olivier Iserbyt's instructable USB Foam Cutter (PVC) - Hot Wire5 months ago
    USB Foam Cutter (PVC) - Hot Wire

    Too much resistance can't hurt the battery or charger. Only too little can - too little is equivalent to a short circuit.However, too much resistance might mean too little heat development to cut effectively.

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  • FlorinJ commented on JackmanWorks's instructable Pallet Wood End Grain Coasters6 months ago
    Pallet Wood End Grain Coasters

    You sure all pallets you started with were of untreated wood? Why I'm asking: around where I live, most pallets, besides being made of wood barely usable for fire, are also most often impregnated wich chemicals to repel insects, mold and whatnot - in general substances toxic for humans.

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  • Heat Recovery Ventilator (Double Flow Controlled Mechanical Ventilation)

    Two questions.1) Wouldn't a slower air flow increase the heat exchange efficiency?2) Would building a counterflow heat exchanger be that much more difficult, using the same technique of creating air channels, only completely sealing off the sides, and, instead of sealing off a whole edge of a pair of plates on the other two sides, have alternating short sealed/unsealed segments along each edge to make the channels for both in- and out-flow?I'm thinking of ways to get the exchanger's efficiency above 95%, that's why I ask.

    The box _would_ be rigid, only the foil would not. The slightest difference in pressure between the inflow and the outflow would bend it out of shape, completely disturbing the flow, potentially breaking the foil. Stretching out the foil so that it cannot bend would rip it apart from before even getting everything set up.What you could do is make the flow slower and the distance between plates larger. Then you could go ahead with foil, since even if it bends it wouldn't be enough to block the air stream. But a larger distance between sheets means a larger box and less good heat exchange.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Mimikry's instructable Easy Pyrography Ornaments6 months ago
    Easy Pyrography Ornaments

    Thanks - thought it was birch, initially, but the pic showing the log doesn't show the bark to be very white, so I was unsure.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Mimikry's instructable Easy Pyrography Ornaments6 months ago
    Easy Pyrography Ornaments

    What was that wood you used?

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  • FlorinJ commented on Pricklysauce's instructable Window Latch6 months ago
    Window Latch

    I absolutely love the simplicity of both the window latch, the barrel bolt and the window stay, the more so since simplicity is mostly a forgotten concept in the world we live in.

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  • Iron Man! How I Made My Own Metallic Piece

    I have absolutely no clue about casting resin, so I have to ask: why two moulds and the intermediate cast?

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  • FlorinJ commented on Left-field Designs's instructable DIY Self-Locking Nut6 months ago
    DIY Self-Locking Nut

    As the video in another comment shows, this just makes it harder/slower for the nut to come loose. What I do, when there's space or the right geometry: screw a small piece of irregularly shaped thin sheet metal (like a piece of tin can, for example) beneath the nut, then bend the sheet metal around some detail of the workpiece, or screw it in place with a small additional screw on a side, and also bend it upwards, to partially wrap the nut. For the nut to come loose, it would need to un-bend the sheet metal.Another method is to drill a hole through both the nut and the screw, once the nut is fastened, stick a metal wire through the hole and wrap it around. But this is limited to larger diameter nuts and bolts, and not as easy and fast as the method in the post above.

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  • FlorinJ commented on VEKSIR's instructable Reclaimed Pallet Fish Tank Stand6 months ago
    Reclaimed Pallet Fish Tank Stand

    Some pallets are chemically treated in a way that makes their wood unsafe for indoor use. Did you look into this?

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  • FlorinJ commented on bjkayani's instructable Outdoor Pizza Oven7 months ago
    Outdoor Pizza Oven

    Ehem ... someone from yet another end of the world here.No need for firebricks and refractory mortar. In my part of the world, traditional bread ovens are pretty much unchanged since Roman antiquity: a heavy build of regular fired bricks and clay - no cement. The clay is left to dry for months, after the oven is built, then, upon the first firing, the heating is slow and progressive, until the oven, in spite of its thick walls (up to 16"/40cm) can't be touched. The inside becomes a compact mass of low-fire ceramics, the outside hardens just enough to resist wear. The only way to damage such an oven, besides a bulldozer, is to throw a bucket of water into the fireplace when the oven is glowing hot. (And it bakes like no modern oven does.)My point: if the oven in this ible survived i...

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    Ehem ... someone from yet another end of the world here.No need for firebricks and refractory mortar. In my part of the world, traditional bread ovens are pretty much unchanged since Roman antiquity: a heavy build of regular fired bricks and clay - no cement. The clay is left to dry for months, after the oven is built, then, upon the first firing, the heating is slow and progressive, until the oven, in spite of its thick walls (up to 16"/40cm) can't be touched. The inside becomes a compact mass of low-fire ceramics, the outside hardens just enough to resist wear. The only way to damage such an oven, besides a bulldozer, is to throw a bucket of water into the fireplace when the oven is glowing hot. (And it bakes like no modern oven does.)My point: if the oven in this ible survived its first firing, the mud probably partially became low fire ceramics, and the oven is now pretty much safe to use. Just make sure it's dry before firing it, or heat it up slowly, so humidity can leave the oven walls without cracking them.

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  • FlorinJ commented on fixthisbuildthat's instructable 5 Ways to Print on Wood7 months ago
    5 Ways to Print on Wood

    How about laser printing the mirrored image on transparent foil, then gluing with a completely transparent glue and the image on the inside? You would not need to apply lacquer and the actual print would be protected from the elements.

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  • FlorinJ commented on manuelmasc's instructable HDPE Blocks From Plastic Bottles8 months ago
    HDPE Blocks From Plastic Bottles

    Don't worry, they are also easier to scratch and then they'll no longer be easier to clean :-) OTOH, you can always make new ones with only the cost of the gas/electricity to re-heat the old ones.Pressing the melted HDPE into more complex shapes to make a bathroom mat was my first thought, though, so I can understand why you made tiles out of them.

    In the same vein as the one suggesting ironing the boards through a sheet of baking paper, you could roll over the baking sheet with a somewhat thicker iron rod heated a bit - not red hot, that would melt the plastic completely.I wouldn't expect a thickness planer to leave plastic completely smooth. Plastic chips differently than wood, I'd expect sort of a grainy texture, almost smooth but not quite, to remain on the board.What you could also do is spread some acetone on the board, and let the board dry out slowly after brushing the surface with a soft paint brush. Acetone dissolves polyethylene, brushing across the board with a soft paintbrush would probably dissolve the rough edges standing out of the surface and fill the grooves with the resulting solution.

    You can only microwave materials which are at least somewhat conductive, or contain particles or substances which are conductive. Plastics in general are insulators. HDPE absorbs very little water, so clean and dry HDPE can most likely not be heated in a microwave owen.

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  • FlorinJ commented on matt's instructable The Original Potato Cannon8 months ago
    The Original Potato Cannon

    You could use a potato gun with legumes as bird shot, then :-)

    Sure you can. It will reduce the range, though.

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  • FlorinJ commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-408 months ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Hardened polyurethane foam or adhesive is impossible to get off your hands, once cured - it seems nothing that doesn't dissolve your skin first is able to dissolve it. Thoroughly greasing your hands, leaving them to stay so for a while (I grease my hands thoroughly with spent cooking oil, then put on a pair of rubber gloves, for up to half an hour), then gently rubbing with a rough cloth peels off most of the polyurethane without taking too much of the skin with it. I wonder if WD-40, with its penetrating solvent and fat residue, might work for cleaning polyurethane off your hands. (I've gotten good at not getting polyurethane on my hands, though, so chances for me to try this out soon are small.)

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  • DIY Concrete and Steel Outdoor End Table | How to Build - Welding

    How about making the stand first, attaching it rigidly to the form so that the top part is embedded in concrete, and then pouring? You could use thinner rebar, maybe some thick wire mesh, at the top, providing some reinforcement for the concrete. Would that work? If yes, I think it would be less work overall.

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  • FlorinJ commented on edyson-'s instructable Old Chair Transformation8 months ago
    Old Chair Transformation

    I was thinking something along the same lines :-)

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  • FlorinJ commented on tomatoskins's instructable Simple Sled for Perfect Segmented Bowls8 months ago
    Simple Sled for Perfect Segmented Bowls

    If you know what a segmented bowl is, it's obvious. If you don't, no amount of description will be of any use.

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  • The Smallest Workshop in the World

    Might give you a few ideas about building the lathe: He also has lots of other videos about building tools.

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  • FlorinJ commented on geotek's instructable Making Box Joints9 months ago
    Making Box Joints

    :-) I have a (self-made) jig that can cut any finger/gap width that's a multiple of 2 mm - that's the step length of the threaded rod I have used (about 1/12"), and also very close to the kerf of the blade I use - the blade is 0.1 mm wider, just enough for 6-8 mm fingers to fit tightly but not too tight into the gaps . For example, for 8 mm(~ 1/3") fingers/gaps, you'd cut every step for four steps/turns of the threaded rod, then skip four turns, and repeat.

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  • FlorinJ commented on aCuriousCreator's instructable Wooden Biltong Box9 months ago
    Wooden Biltong Box

    Tearout: tape won't cut it. You need a different blade.

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  • FlorinJ commented on geotek's instructable Making Box Joints9 months ago
    Making Box Joints

    You can make finger joints using a regular blade too. You only have to make more passes for one slot. You just need a mechanism or something to precisely control advance in relation to your blade's thickness. I've seen two variants so far: one using a screw with a known step size and another one using cogwheels. The simplest one, which I partially replicated, using a screw, is on the darbin orwar channel on youtube. It should be probably easily guessable: the one using cogwheels is also exemplified on youtube on Matthias Wandel's channel.

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  • FlorinJ commented on jessyratfink's instructable Unusual Uses for Rice10 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Rice

    Those who starve are no more your problem than global climate change is. As technology evolves, our planet sort of becomes smaller - it's more connected from more than just one point of view. Social or economical or environmental problems across the world affect your life too - here's an example: http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/story?id=129787&page=1. That makes hunger in Africa your problem too. For one, hunger and lack of education is fueling radical Islamic terrorist propaganda. 9/11 wasn't your problem either, right?But that's already way off topic.

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  • FlorinJ commented on jessyratfink's instructable Unusual Uses for Rice10 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Rice

    Most wood cut into planks or boards at timber yards, or used for furniture by artisan carpenter shops is not treated in any way. Some exotic wood species are irritating when their sawdust is inhaled. Few are right-out toxic. Sawdust sold for cat litter or bird cages is also not treated in any way, just pressed.

    Salt is as much food as sodium bicarbonate, sodium nitrate, sodium glutamate (found naturally in large quantities in tomatoes and matured cheeses) or sodium benzoate (used as a preservative, but also produced naturally in the body when digesting cinnamon) are.Sawdust is bad for fine mechanism. It does not ruin electronics. Plus, it depends on the graininess. You'll have a hard time cleaning very fine sawdust that has gotten into your phone. But coarser grain sawdust, such as thickness planer shavings, are safe.Rice will last for years, if kept dry. Insects can also not infest food kept in closed containers.

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  • FlorinJ commented on jessyratfink's instructable Unusual Uses for Rice10 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Rice

    I spent most of the summers of my childhood either in the countryside or high up in the mountains. In traditional homesteads, leftovers went to the pigs and hens, if there were any leftovers at all (dogs gobbled them up first, usually). High up in the mountains chances are high that spreading leftovers around will attract unwanted visitors to your camping place. Hence, I don't like wasting leftovers.I tried most of the things I described above myself, and can tell for sure that at least for most of them rice does not at all work better than sawdust. Or salt, or spent coffee grounds, depending on the specific use. Also, most sawdust is absolutely safe. I haven't heard of anybody getting poisoned from the use of wooden cutting boards or wooden spoons.There is plenty of food on the shelves...

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    I spent most of the summers of my childhood either in the countryside or high up in the mountains. In traditional homesteads, leftovers went to the pigs and hens, if there were any leftovers at all (dogs gobbled them up first, usually). High up in the mountains chances are high that spreading leftovers around will attract unwanted visitors to your camping place. Hence, I don't like wasting leftovers.I tried most of the things I described above myself, and can tell for sure that at least for most of them rice does not at all work better than sawdust. Or salt, or spent coffee grounds, depending on the specific use. Also, most sawdust is absolutely safe. I haven't heard of anybody getting poisoned from the use of wooden cutting boards or wooden spoons.There is plenty of food on the shelves of Western stores. Still, millions of people worldwide starve, tens of thousands of small children dying of hunger each day - http://www.worldhunger.org/world-child-hunger-facts/. (FYI, that's not a horror movie, it's horror reality, only, it's easy enough to ignore if you have plenty of food on your table.) Which is why I try not to waste food.And it's spelled mcgyvering.

    Rice is food. I was brought up to not use food for non-food purposes, at least not in large quantities.For most of the uses I described, I know first hand that they perform better than rice.Plus, about salt and sawdust. At least around where I live salt is abundant and cheap - we literally have a mountain of it, and that isn't even the biggest salt reserve around here. Sawdust is a byproduct, a problem most woodworking shops need to deal with, not a waste of resources perfectly usable in other ways. Sawdust is also renewable - all you have to do is let another tree grow. And another plus: you probably can't reuse rice hundreds of times. It will catch mold, once it has absorbed enough humidity. Even if it doesn't catch mold, once food moths discover that you keep rice in an openly access...

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    Rice is food. I was brought up to not use food for non-food purposes, at least not in large quantities.For most of the uses I described, I know first hand that they perform better than rice.Plus, about salt and sawdust. At least around where I live salt is abundant and cheap - we literally have a mountain of it, and that isn't even the biggest salt reserve around here. Sawdust is a byproduct, a problem most woodworking shops need to deal with, not a waste of resources perfectly usable in other ways. Sawdust is also renewable - all you have to do is let another tree grow. And another plus: you probably can't reuse rice hundreds of times. It will catch mold, once it has absorbed enough humidity. Even if it doesn't catch mold, once food moths discover that you keep rice in an openly accessible location, you'll spend years trying to get rid of them, unless you immediately throw that rice out.

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  • Concrete Countertops for the Kitchen - a Solid Surface on the Cheap

    You can also use some acid stain to give it more color.

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  • FlorinJ commented on bennelson's instructable Build Your Own Electric Car!11 months ago
    Build Your Own Electric Car!

    You could probably significantly enhance the autonomy by using lifepo4 batteries - they store more than 2.5 times as much energy as lead acid batteries, for the same weight, and their capacity decays a lot slower in time - ~1000 reloads for lead acid vs ~2500 for lifepo4. In the long run, this might save you some money - at the cost of an maybe five times higher up-front investment (for new batteries of both types, I don't know if you can get second hand lifepo4 batteries).

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  • The Single Most Effective Way to Get Rid of a Sunburn

    Not everybody is similarly sensitive to sunlight. I'm white as chalk, and my skin has only three states: 1) white, 2) fiery dark red and 3) peeling off, and it only takes about 45 minutes of sun at noon for me to go from 1 to 3.By comparison, my sister becomes chocolate dark in the summer without even staying too much out in the sun, and never ever experienced skin peeling from the sun. She can sleep a whole day in bright sun (she did, by mistake, as a child), and the only thing she gets from this is thirsty.We live in the same city, it's only that her skin is way better than mine at secreting melanin.

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  • FlorinJ commented on F4916's instructable How to Desalinate Seawater11 months ago
    How to Desalinate Seawater

    You can't always afford to make fire, in survival situations.

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  • FlorinJ commented on neilmendoza's instructable Fish Hammer Actuation Device1 year ago
    Fish Hammer Actuation Device

    Goldfish, additionally to the lateral line, also have an inner ear. They do not emit sound, but they seem to be able to build up a model of their environment based on what sounds they hear.You probably won't find any research answering specifically to the question of whether goldfish can locate objects using sound. Research is usually a lot more focused, since goldfish are the lab rat for fish hearing research, having a very high performance hearing system. Like for example this study - in layman's terms, it studies how well goldfish can tell from what direction a sound is coming, specifically using their inner ear, not the lateral line:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8520933This research goes even further, stating that goldfish specifically can process reverberations, reflections a...

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    Goldfish, additionally to the lateral line, also have an inner ear. They do not emit sound, but they seem to be able to build up a model of their environment based on what sounds they hear.You probably won't find any research answering specifically to the question of whether goldfish can locate objects using sound. Research is usually a lot more focused, since goldfish are the lab rat for fish hearing research, having a very high performance hearing system. Like for example this study - in layman's terms, it studies how well goldfish can tell from what direction a sound is coming, specifically using their inner ear, not the lateral line:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8520933This research goes even further, stating that goldfish specifically can process reverberations, reflections and temporal patterns to locate the source and nature of sound:https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-46...A cylinder or a bowl tend to focalize external sound towards a single point in the interior, putting stress on the fish'es hearing. If the fish finds itself in such a focal point, his hearing sense will be stressed - the usual sound processing pattern he uses will get a kind of signal the fish is not capable of processing.Think of us and vision. If somebody puts up a set of mirrors so that you see his reflection in many directions at once, you won't be able to tell which image is the original. This can be stressful.At their origin, goldfish were common carps, living in ponds with water too murky for visually detecting predators or food at a long distance. Their vision and hearing were shaped by that environment. A species not able to detect predators at a distance wouldn't be as successful as the carp.

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  • FlorinJ commented on neilmendoza's instructable Fish Hammer Actuation Device1 year ago
    Fish Hammer Actuation Device

    Don't keep goldfish in bowls or cylinders. They use echolocation. When they're near the center of the bowl or the axis of a cylinder, they shout in their own ears.

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  • FlorinJ commented on aliceniraimathi19's instructable How to Make Skeleton Leaves1 year ago
    How to Make Skeleton Leaves

    Could you use these as stencils? Place on a flat surface, spray some paint on top, to get a leaf impression on the surface?

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  • FlorinJ commented on Mic100's instructable Make LadyBug Simple Cheap Vibrobot1 year ago
    Make LadyBug  Simple Cheap Vibrobot

    Nice! Now make it fly :-)

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  • FlorinJ commented on danthemakerman's instructable Letter Opener Made From Junk Mail1 year ago
    Letter Opener Made From Junk Mail

    The material itself would probably lend itself well to be machined into various items on a CNC router.

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  • FlorinJ commented on woodbywright's instructable How to Hand Cut Dovetails1 year ago
    How to Hand Cut Dovetails

    If someone has a problem with chisels, he can use a rasp. My point was more about not taking off too much material initially, since you can't put it back, not so much about the tools used.

    If someone has a problem with chisels, he can use a rasp. My point was more about not taking off too much material initially, since you can't put it back, not so much about the tools used, and, as an addition, specifically for beginners, about how to use the tools so they don't take off too much material.

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  • FlorinJ commented on woodbywright's instructable How to Hand Cut Dovetails1 year ago
    How to Hand Cut Dovetails

    I suppose most woodworkers know this, it's meant for people who are just learning: cut on the inside of the material to be removed, both when you chisel away at the bottom of the pins and when you saw the sides of the pins.What do I mean by this: each cut has a finite width - one that's large enough to create unsightly gaps, if the cut is done on the wrong side of a marking, and also affect the joint's strength.A cut should be done by placing the saw slightly towards the material to be removed, not centered on the marking, so that ideally you cut down along the edge of the marking, not right through the marking. You can always chisel away material after the cut is done, if the fit is too tight, but there's no way you can add material back, once you removed it.A chisel pushes in both dir...

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    I suppose most woodworkers know this, it's meant for people who are just learning: cut on the inside of the material to be removed, both when you chisel away at the bottom of the pins and when you saw the sides of the pins.What do I mean by this: each cut has a finite width - one that's large enough to create unsightly gaps, if the cut is done on the wrong side of a marking, and also affect the joint's strength.A cut should be done by placing the saw slightly towards the material to be removed, not centered on the marking, so that ideally you cut down along the edge of the marking, not right through the marking. You can always chisel away material after the cut is done, if the fit is too tight, but there's no way you can add material back, once you removed it.A chisel pushes in both directions, when being driven into solid material, therefore, upon the initial cut, don't place it right on the marking, place it a hairline's thickness away from the marking - once the thick material is removed, you can come back and nibble away at the remaining thin layer without much push forward, towards the marking, as you'd have if you drive it in while there'd still be solid material at the back of the chisel.

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  • FlorinJ commented on wold630's instructable Non-Toxic Adhesive Removal1 year ago
    Non-Toxic Adhesive Removal

    I described how I use paraffin candle oil in another comment. I suppose this should work on your poly-carbonate/acrylic plates too - to my knowledge, paraffin oil does not affect those materials. Given that they are dried over a long time, however, you might have to do some rubbing/waiting before the solvent penetrates the glue layer.

    What I use: paraffin candle oil. I always have some at home. How I do it: soak the label in water, and, once softened, scrape what comes off - the smooth, paint-covered surface of the label otherwise prevents the oil from reaching the glue. You don't have to do a very good job of removing the paper so far, you just have to end up with a porous paper surface, instead of the smooth, sealed one that the label initially had. Put a few drops of candle oil and rub it into the paper - that's why you wanted a porous surface, the oil would not easily reach the glue through the intact paper surface. The adhesive will dissolve and come off easily and completely, together with the remaining pieces of paper. Now wash with dish washing soap as you would any regular dish. The candle oil comes off like...

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    What I use: paraffin candle oil. I always have some at home. How I do it: soak the label in water, and, once softened, scrape what comes off - the smooth, paint-covered surface of the label otherwise prevents the oil from reaching the glue. You don't have to do a very good job of removing the paper so far, you just have to end up with a porous paper surface, instead of the smooth, sealed one that the label initially had. Put a few drops of candle oil and rub it into the paper - that's why you wanted a porous surface, the oil would not easily reach the glue through the intact paper surface. The adhesive will dissolve and come off easily and completely, together with the remaining pieces of paper. Now wash with dish washing soap as you would any regular dish. The candle oil comes off like any other grease, leaving absolutely no residue behind.

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  • FlorinJ commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Easy Waterproof Clothing1 year ago
    Easy Waterproof Clothing

    I have to make a backpack. Guess how I'll get the waterproof textile material for it ...

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  • FlorinJ commented on ChristinaTapp's instructable Fun with Wine Bottles1 year ago
    Fun with Wine Bottles

    How many cycles of hot/cold water did you need, approximately, for regular wine bottles?

    For peeling off the labels, I use a slightly different method. Often, the glue used for the labels does not soften in water, only the paper gets wet, so when you clean the bottles you are still left with some goo that won't easily come off. Therefore, I simply rub the paper until the waxed/water repellant surface tears off, then pour a tiny bit of lamp oil, and rub it in. The lamp oil is stinky but dissolves the glue. Then I can wash the greasy lamp oil off with alcohol or regular dish washing soap.

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  • FlorinJ commented on WardWorks's instructable Build a Plastic Vacuum Former1 year ago
    Build a Plastic Vacuum Former

    How many watts do all heating elements taken together have? I couldn't figure this out by skimming through the text.More important: what's the temperature you need to have inside the oven? IMO a thermostat inside the oven would be very useful - without it, variations in environment temperature, wind or draft or variation of network voltage combined have an unpredictable effect on the temperature inside the oven. Your material can start to bubble or stay too stiff. (I managed to get lots of bubbles inside a 2mm (1/2") sheet of Plexiglas with a heat gun, and it was still too stiff - uniform heating at constant temperature is important.)An idea of how to compute what vacuum can or cannot break: the maximum load corresponds to atmospheric pressure, which is equivalent to about a column...

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    How many watts do all heating elements taken together have? I couldn't figure this out by skimming through the text.More important: what's the temperature you need to have inside the oven? IMO a thermostat inside the oven would be very useful - without it, variations in environment temperature, wind or draft or variation of network voltage combined have an unpredictable effect on the temperature inside the oven. Your material can start to bubble or stay too stiff. (I managed to get lots of bubbles inside a 2mm (1/2") sheet of Plexiglas with a heat gun, and it was still too stiff - uniform heating at constant temperature is important.)An idea of how to compute what vacuum can or cannot break: the maximum load corresponds to atmospheric pressure, which is equivalent to about a column of water 10 meters high. A good quality 1" thick softwood board could carry that load with a reasonable safety margin. Plus, what vacuum you are able to create with a piston pump is nowhere near close to ideal - 30% or so of the outside air pressure on the inside is already a good performance for such a pump (and more than enough to mold heated plastics).

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  • FlorinJ commented on joe57005's instructable How to set up multiple monitors in linux1 year ago
    How to set up multiple monitors in linux

    Depending on the video cards you're going to use and the software you're going to run, the IO of your system might become a bit stressed ...

    For reference. Just switched from a single dual-port card (VGA + DVI) with two monitors to a setup with two identical single port cheap and ancient geforce cards. All I had to do after plugging in the hardware was to reboot. It automatically updated the X configuration, and switched both monitors to the maximum available resolution.OS is Ubuntu 14.04 (it's a LTS release, so I won't drop it too soon).All I had to do manually after reboot was to readjust each monitor anew via the controls of the monitor, and reconfigure tilda - the different screen resolutions meant it no longer showed where and how I wanted it to.

    Sure. Provided you find a way to add additional video adapters to a rasp.pi.

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  • FlorinJ commented on Robin Lewis's instructable How to Make a Concrete Countertop1 year ago
    How to Make a Concrete Countertop

    Google acid staining of concrete. There are many commercial stains out there, but there are some people that developed DIY methods.Only, make sure you pour several smaller pieces to experiment with, before applying it to the large slab.

    I think you can also rub in hot beeswax. I've read other people had a good experience with tung oil.

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  • FlorinJ commented on bigchewypretzels's instructable hand making an engagement ring1 year ago
    hand making an engagement ring

    Thanks. Now that you say it it's obvious, but for some reason I didn't think of it.

    What cheaper metal can you use to train yourself, before you actually use something expensive?

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  • FlorinJ commented on jallwine's instructable Customizable Work Bench1 year ago
    Customizable Work Bench

    I've built myself something similar, already a few years ago. Only, the pegboard I have suspended on the wall, un-attached to the table. When I hammer on the table, I don't need all tools on the pegboard to start shaking. I also use a shelving rack built from scraps to keep tools, rather than keeping them on the table, for the same reason. (Constantly moving the portable table saw/miter saw/thickness planer/drill stand/table grinder on and off the table also helps staying fit.)

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  • Easy No Bake Bloody Chocolate Spider Web Tart

    Instead of heating chocolate directly on the fire, you may want to use steam. Simply put a larger bowl on top of a smaller pan filled half-way with water, and heat the water. This way it's less likely to overheat the chocolate/cream/ganache. IME, you don't need the mix to boil, just to get hot enough to melt everything, so it can be mixed well. Getting the chocolate to overheat will cause your ganache to be difficult to mix and not look nice (supposedly - never happened to me, since I heat neither the cream nor the chocolate on fire).

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  • How to Make the Best Ever Pigs in Blankets With Cheesy Mustard Dipping Sauce

    What I do to the rosemary: pick it, dry it to the extreme (by leaving it in a dry and dark place, not by placing it in the sun), then simply grind it in a coffee grinder. The flavor is preserved, but it's a lot easier to spread, and it keeps forever. It doesn't loose flavor if kept in an airtight closed jar.

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  • Outdoor Workbench with Internal Wood Storage

    They also have a model which sort of bends over backwards - click the second thumbnail at the top in the page I linked to above. I think these allow for some extension when the door's back edge hits an obstacle, such as the cabinet frame.Anyway, I didn't mean they're better - they're not (they're weaker and are not adjustable). If you don't mind the more complex mounting process, the hinges you used are definitely stronger.A few months ago, maybe a year or so, I had to disassemble a 25+ year old cabinet made of particle board. The hinges - similar to what you used - were as solid as new. The doors were still closing and opening perfectly The hinges hadn't seen even a drop of oil in all the years, and were still operating perfectly. All I remember ever doing to them is tightening one adj...

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    They also have a model which sort of bends over backwards - click the second thumbnail at the top in the page I linked to above. I think these allow for some extension when the door's back edge hits an obstacle, such as the cabinet frame.Anyway, I didn't mean they're better - they're not (they're weaker and are not adjustable). If you don't mind the more complex mounting process, the hinges you used are definitely stronger.A few months ago, maybe a year or so, I had to disassemble a 25+ year old cabinet made of particle board. The hinges - similar to what you used - were as solid as new. The doors were still closing and opening perfectly The hinges hadn't seen even a drop of oil in all the years, and were still operating perfectly. All I remember ever doing to them is tightening one adjustment screw.

    They also have a type which sort of bends over - just click on the second thumbnail at the top in the page I linked to above.

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  • Outdoor Workbench with Internal Wood Storage

    What I use: https://diy.hettich.com/en/products/hinges/special-hinges/screw-on-hinges.html. They're slightly weaker than blum hinges, but easier to mount.I usually clamp the doors in place, then screw on the hinges from the inside, and only then do I mount the back of the cabinet. I then take the hinges off and finish everything, then put things back together again.

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  • FlorinJ commented on kdac's instructable Concrete Coffee Table1 year ago
    Concrete Coffee Table

    Depends on the concrete mix. Do a slab with (weightwise) 3 parts cement, 20 parts sand and 2 parts water (just enough so there is no more dry powder after thorough mixing - excess water makes for soft concrete). The resulting mixture should seem not to hold together. If it easily holds together it's too wet. It will hold together very well, once cured, if compacted before starting to cure - see below. Use something to shake up/vibrate the mold while pouring (for instance an orbital sander attached with screws or tape to the mold), and beat the conrete in with a piece of firewood or a brick or something similar, to remove all bubbles - if you prepare it pretty dry it won't flow to fill all gaps by itself. Then yes, the resulting slab will have no large pores and open bubbles and will be ...

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    Depends on the concrete mix. Do a slab with (weightwise) 3 parts cement, 20 parts sand and 2 parts water (just enough so there is no more dry powder after thorough mixing - excess water makes for soft concrete). The resulting mixture should seem not to hold together. If it easily holds together it's too wet. It will hold together very well, once cured, if compacted before starting to cure - see below. Use something to shake up/vibrate the mold while pouring (for instance an orbital sander attached with screws or tape to the mold), and beat the conrete in with a piece of firewood or a brick or something similar, to remove all bubbles - if you prepare it pretty dry it won't flow to fill all gaps by itself. Then yes, the resulting slab will have no large pores and open bubbles and will be extremely strong.A slab poured with a mix too wet will be soft, and easy to chip. A decently reinforced slab, at the size of a table and with no significant load to bear will not break, but a chipped coffee table is probably not what you want in your living room.

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  • FlorinJ commented on seamster's instructable Impossible Nail in Wooden Block1 year ago
    Impossible Nail in Wooden Block

    I didn't say it's the smartest or best way to do it, only that I believe it is possible. I like your idea with a sleeve more than my initial idea with a threaded hole. I only thought of a threaded hole because I had to do something similar, some time ago, when the screw holding a french press'es filter to the shaft got stripped.

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