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  • Repair Mini Cooper Electric Door Lock Actuator / Locking Mechanism

    THANK YOU! I would never have tried this without your tutorial (with pictures)... and I would never have spend $130 to deal with the fact that the driver's side door would not unlock without the key in the lock. We have dealt with this problem for years! Now the dash button and the remote fob unlock the driver's door. It did take me the better part of 5 hours on a Sunday. I took lots of photos that I would love to share with anyone attempting this. These include the angle you need to position the actuator in to remove it from the door (took me about 10 minutes to figure that one out), and detailed pictures of the actuator and motors during disassembly.Tips:1) the "compression" washer over the pin is a real b*tch to get off. I used an engraving tool on a dremel to make a small ...see more »THANK YOU! I would never have tried this without your tutorial (with pictures)... and I would never have spend $130 to deal with the fact that the driver's side door would not unlock without the key in the lock. We have dealt with this problem for years! Now the dash button and the remote fob unlock the driver's door. It did take me the better part of 5 hours on a Sunday. I took lots of photos that I would love to share with anyone attempting this. These include the angle you need to position the actuator in to remove it from the door (took me about 10 minutes to figure that one out), and detailed pictures of the actuator and motors during disassembly.Tips:1) the "compression" washer over the pin is a real b*tch to get off. I used an engraving tool on a dremel to make a small slit in the washer so that I could pry it off. However, the washer actually cracked on the opposite side and was useless. This pin is pretty important for holding the side of the actuator against the bottom, so I had to run out to HomeDepot and pick up a #10 countersunk (flat head) bolt (#10-32 x 1") and nut to replace the pin/washer.2) I tried using shims, but several of the white plastic clips broke (the plastic is very brittle). Turns out it doesn't really matter, the pin and 4 torx screws hold it together very well. 3) I used a product called Electro-wash by chemtronics, which is a spray for electronics cleaning on the motor. I also used a brass bristle brush, and a round nylon brush on a dremel. Be very careful/gentle when cleaning the commutators (the three copper plates around the shaft of the motor) - at their base is the very fine wiring the leads around the armature of the motor. If you scrape a wire loose the whole motor is toast.4) I used a caliper to measure the shaft of the motor (above and below the commutator to determine the hole size to drill for the washers. I believe the two holes I had to drill were 0.1285" (#30 drill) and 0.1015" (#38 drill). It helps to drill the hole first and then cut out the plastic around it. 5) After you put everything back together, if you plug the actuator back into your car before re-attaching everything to test it, be sure to push down the little button in the corner of the actuator. This tricks the actuator into thinking the car door is closed and will allow the actuator to lock/unlock the mechanism. If you don't push the button, the actuator won't function, and you'll think you put it together wrong and will tear it apart, again. Maybe twice. Ask me how I know.6) give yourself plenty of time. I started this around 1pm and finished around 6pm, with a trip to HomeDepot in the middle. I would have been done a half-hour sooner if I didn't have to go out to get the bolt/nut to replace the pin/washer, and another hour sooner if I didn't think I assembled everything wrong when I was testing it and tore-it all apart again. Reassembly went very quickly.

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