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2Instructables11,836Views126CommentsPittsburgh, PA, USA, Sol, Andromeda Arm, Milky Way, UniverseJoined March 21st, 2007

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  • FREE SUMO ROBOT STRUCTURE From 5L Cleaning Container

    This looks interesting, but I don't recognize the cleaning container. What product did it contain, and where can we get it? Also, could you show a photo of the original container, with all labels, before you did anything to it, please? That could help us to find a compatible container, in case they do not sell that product where we live.Thanks.

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  • Granzeier commented on alamtania's instructable How to Book a Cab in Uber?2 months ago
    How to Book a Cab in Uber?

    As an Uber (and Lyft) driver, I would like to add a couple of tips.1) Make sure that the pickup location is correct. If you are in a downtown area with tall buildings, it may be better to not use the "my location" - the buildings can throw the location off. I have been directed as much as four blocks away from where the customer was located.2) Try to have the address number clearly visible, it can be difficult to see the numbers from the street, and so I sometimes end up a couple houses away from where the rider is waiting.3) If you are at a building that has more than one entrance (such as a front and rear,) keep an eye on both entrances. The drivers are not told which door to use (nor even that there is more than one door.) I have had a couple of people waiting for their...

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    As an Uber (and Lyft) driver, I would like to add a couple of tips.1) Make sure that the pickup location is correct. If you are in a downtown area with tall buildings, it may be better to not use the "my location" - the buildings can throw the location off. I have been directed as much as four blocks away from where the customer was located.2) Try to have the address number clearly visible, it can be difficult to see the numbers from the street, and so I sometimes end up a couple houses away from where the rider is waiting.3) If you are at a building that has more than one entrance (such as a front and rear,) keep an eye on both entrances. The drivers are not told which door to use (nor even that there is more than one door.) I have had a couple of people waiting for their ride, because I was at one door, and they were at the other.These tips also apply to Lyft, and any other ride sharing system.Thanks for this 'Ibe.

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  • Granzeier commented on matt392's instructable Dollar Tree $10 Toolkit (Hand Tools)4 months ago
    Dollar Tree $10 Toolkit (Hand Tools)

    Nice selection for a quick and easy general-purpose tool kit.

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  • Granzeier commented on HardiqV's instructable Top Eight Interesting Notepad Tricks4 months ago
    Top Eight Interesting Notepad Tricks

    Very nice introduction to scripting. Actually only one of these (the first) is a trick of Notepad. I've been doing that for years. The rest are all using Notepad to write script programs. But, you have found a way to introduce script programming, and disguise it as interesting tricks. Nicely played HardiqV, nicely played!For anyone else who liked this, you have begun down the road to programming. Combine these tricks (the VBS tricks, and the BAT tricks are easiest when kept with each other rather than mixing VBS and BAT in one file,) and you will soon have the computer doing your tricks.

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  • Granzeier commented on Erik973's instructable Matchbox Mini Chess Learning Machine6 months ago
    Matchbox Mini Chess Learning Machine

    Donald Michie, a British mathematician wrote about this type (matchbox) learning and it was published in the early 1960s. The great Mathematical Games author from Scientific American, Martin Gardner, wrote about it in 1962 (http://cs.williams.edu/~freund/cs136-073/GardnerHexapawn.pdf.) He then went on to describe this Hexapawn game. You did a great job of describing this and making an old game into something modern readers may enjoy.

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  • Granzeier commented on RetroTech386's instructable DIY Dremel Tool Made of PVC Pipe6 months ago
    DIY Dremel Tool Made of PVC Pipe

    A DC motor designed for 6V, running at 120V (AC or DC)? Not very likely. It will probably spin very fast for a second or two, and then you will let the magic smoke out, and it will stop. Be careful about where you try this - there may be fire involved.

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  • Granzeier commented on RetroTech386's instructable DIY Dremel Tool Made of PVC Pipe6 months ago
    DIY Dremel Tool Made of PVC Pipe

    I see, very interesting, I had not thought that that would work.Thank you.

    How do you connect the drill bits to the motor shaft?

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  • Granzeier commented on TechJoint's instructable Clever Ways to Cheat on a Test8 months ago
    Clever Ways to Cheat on a Test

    It's pretty sad that you think that the only way you can succeed is by cheating. Try studying more, you may find that you are not that pathetic after all.

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  • Granzeier commented on amandaghassaei's instructable Breadboard How To12 months ago
    Breadboard How To

    No Sir, I must stick to my original claim: electron flow (which IS current flow - the ampere which is the measure of current flow, describes the "number of electrons to pass a point in a circuit in one second") is from negative to positive. As, I said, there is nothing else moving inside an electrical circuit besides electrons. And, with a negative charge, they must move away from a negative charge, and towards a more positive charge.The idea that current flows from positive to negative (as mentioned by Jseay, below) comes from Ben Franklin. He was handicapped by a lack of understanding of the nature of atoms, and the complete lack of knowledge of sub-atomic particles. While a brilliant scientist, Franklin did not have the technology to understand the inner working of the ...

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    No Sir, I must stick to my original claim: electron flow (which IS current flow - the ampere which is the measure of current flow, describes the "number of electrons to pass a point in a circuit in one second") is from negative to positive. As, I said, there is nothing else moving inside an electrical circuit besides electrons. And, with a negative charge, they must move away from a negative charge, and towards a more positive charge.The idea that current flows from positive to negative (as mentioned by Jseay, below) comes from Ben Franklin. He was handicapped by a lack of understanding of the nature of atoms, and the complete lack of knowledge of sub-atomic particles. While a brilliant scientist, Franklin did not have the technology to understand the inner working of the atom.Today, we know that an electron (from the valence, or outer, orbit of an atom) is attracted to another atom by a positive charge. This atom will leave the valence of it's atom, and jump into the valence of a neighboring atom, in the direction of the positive charge. The lack of the electron in the previous atom gives that atom a positive charge, which then "attracts" an electron from the neighbor down-stream (closer to the negative charge.) These positive charges appear to be moving from positive to negative. But current (the flow of electrons) is always from negative.Also, as Jseay alludes to, engineers will often use the idea of current flowing from positive to negative (hole theory) in design (or troubleshooting.) This is often a good way to design a circuit. It is similar to the idea that, often, the best way to solve a maze is to start at the end, and work your way back to the beginning. You plan a trip in a similar way: you do not look at where you are starting, but rather where you want to end up. Then you plan your trip in that direction.And, yes, I do mean teaching electronics – and all of my teaching has been in college-level institutions. And, yes, I have had the complete backing of my Chair, and department heads. As I mentioned, there are often times that engineers must work “backwards,” but to teach students to ignore the physical reality of their circuit is the real disservice. Also, I have never heard of any of my students needing to unlearn current flow, in order to relearn engineering mathematics.So, as I stated above, I must stick with my original claim: electron flow (which IS current flow) is from negative to positive.

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  • Recycled Computer Fans to Operate Heat Sinks

    Very interesting, I had not thought about using rocks for thermal storage. Nice idea about recycling old fans to route the air through your system.One small correction: you suggest using an inverter to power the fan(s). An inverter takes direct current (DC - usually 12V, or something that can be easily stored by batteries) and converts that into alternating current (AC - usually 110-120V, or what normally comes out of your wall outlet.) Your description shows using a 120V to 12V device, that is almost always 120V AC input and 12V DC output; this is called a power supply, rather than an inverter. Other than that, this looks pretty good.

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