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  • Granzeier commented on amandaghassaei's instructable Breadboard How To2 weeks ago
    Breadboard How To

    No Sir, I must stick to my original claim: electron flow (which IS current flow - the ampere which is the measure of current flow, describes the "number of electrons to pass a point in a circuit in one second") is from negative to positive. As, I said, there is nothing else moving inside an electrical circuit besides electrons. And, with a negative charge, they must move away from a negative charge, and towards a more positive charge.The idea that current flows from positive to negative (as mentioned by Jseay, below) comes from Ben Franklin. He was handicapped by a lack of understanding of the nature of atoms, and the complete lack of knowledge of sub-atomic particles. While a brilliant scientist, Franklin did not have the technology to understand the inner working of the ...see more »No Sir, I must stick to my original claim: electron flow (which IS current flow - the ampere which is the measure of current flow, describes the "number of electrons to pass a point in a circuit in one second") is from negative to positive. As, I said, there is nothing else moving inside an electrical circuit besides electrons. And, with a negative charge, they must move away from a negative charge, and towards a more positive charge.The idea that current flows from positive to negative (as mentioned by Jseay, below) comes from Ben Franklin. He was handicapped by a lack of understanding of the nature of atoms, and the complete lack of knowledge of sub-atomic particles. While a brilliant scientist, Franklin did not have the technology to understand the inner working of the atom.Today, we know that an electron (from the valence, or outer, orbit of an atom) is attracted to another atom by a positive charge. This atom will leave the valence of it's atom, and jump into the valence of a neighboring atom, in the direction of the positive charge. The lack of the electron in the previous atom gives that atom a positive charge, which then "attracts" an electron from the neighbor down-stream (closer to the negative charge.) These positive charges appear to be moving from positive to negative. But current (the flow of electrons) is always from negative.Also, as Jseay alludes to, engineers will often use the idea of current flowing from positive to negative (hole theory) in design (or troubleshooting.) This is often a good way to design a circuit. It is similar to the idea that, often, the best way to solve a maze is to start at the end, and work your way back to the beginning. You plan a trip in a similar way: you do not look at where you are starting, but rather where you want to end up. Then you plan your trip in that direction.And, yes, I do mean teaching electronics – and all of my teaching has been in college-level institutions. And, yes, I have had the complete backing of my Chair, and department heads. As I mentioned, there are often times that engineers must work “backwards,” but to teach students to ignore the physical reality of their circuit is the real disservice. Also, I have never heard of any of my students needing to unlearn current flow, in order to relearn engineering mathematics.So, as I stated above, I must stick with my original claim: electron flow (which IS current flow) is from negative to positive.

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  • Recycled Computer Fans to Operate Heat Sinks

    Very interesting, I had not thought about using rocks for thermal storage. Nice idea about recycling old fans to route the air through your system.One small correction: you suggest using an inverter to power the fan(s). An inverter takes direct current (DC - usually 12V, or something that can be easily stored by batteries) and converts that into alternating current (AC - usually 110-120V, or what normally comes out of your wall outlet.) Your description shows using a 120V to 12V device, that is almost always 120V AC input and 12V DC output; this is called a power supply, rather than an inverter. Other than that, this looks pretty good.

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