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8Instructables921,960Views196 CommentsRaleigh, NC
Brian Kaminski Owner - Advancer Technologies Brian graduated from North Carolina State University with a BS in Biomedical Engineering with a concentration in Biomechanics in May, 2006. While at North Carolina State University, Brian was involved in projects relating to biomechanics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, biomodeling, and biorobotics. In December of 2007, Brian received an MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan. His graduate studies emphasized biomechanics, ... Read More »

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  • DIY Muscle Sensor / EMG Circuit for a Microcontroller

    www.processing.orgYou can find the code we used on our Git Hub repository https://github.com/AdvancerTechnologies/MyoWare_MuscleSensor/tree/master/Example%20Code/BarGraph

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  • DIY Muscle Sensor / EMG Circuit for a Microcontroller

    I'm not sure what you mean. This tutorial details all the work to get this circuit working.

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  • Gundanium commented on Gundanium's instructable USB Biofeedback Game Controller2 months ago
    USB Biofeedback Game Controller

    I think the R3 has a different chip for its USB interface. I would recommend looking into that. If the chips are the same, then you can use the same steps.

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  • DIY Muscle Sensor / EMG Circuit for a Microcontroller

    No R3 is part of the first gain phase

    This is something you're going to have to figure out yourself. Good luck!

    I don't think I ever measured how much current this circuit draws but our MyoWare sensor only draws around 12mA. I wouldn't expect this circuit to draw much higher.

    Yup pretty much

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  • DIY Muscle Sensor / EMG Circuit for a Microcontroller

    Are you trying to measure 6 different muscles with 1 circuit and a mux? It's hard to follow what you're proposing to do. If you are indeed trying this, then my recommended approach would be to put the mux between the signal acquisition phase (step 3) and the Signal Conditioning - Amplification phase (step 4) and you will need a signal acquisition phase for each muscle. The reason for this is that your skin has an extremely high impedance and will cause ghosting effects (aka a trace of the previous input will appear when you switch the mux inputs). The opamp of the signal acquisition phase will act as an impedance buffer and eliminate all ghosting effects.

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  • DIY Muscle Sensor / EMG Circuit for a Microcontroller

    Hi Sarega! 1) It depends on how you are planning to use the EMG. The rectified and integrated signal (envelope) is useful for determining the force the muscle is exerting but you lose the frequency characteristics of the raw signal. The frequency characteristics can tell you what type of muscle fibers are firing but I don't see why you wouldn't be OK using the EMG envelope. The envelope would probably be preferable because it is more easily read by a microcontroller. 2) Yes alligator clips will work fine. What do you mean when you say "role of emg recording role"? I do not understand that part of your question.

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  • DIY Muscle Sensor / EMG Circuit for a Microcontroller

    Hi JI!This is a very old tutorial and our new sensors don't require the positive/negative power supply and can be powered directly from an Arduino. http://www.advancertechnologies.com/p/shop_3.htmlSetup 1: Voltage inverterThe INA106 and TL072 chips need a minimum of +/-5V so you should be fine using an inverter powered via an Arduino 5V supply.Setup 2: Voltage dividerIf you want to use the schematic/chips from this tutorial and a voltage divider, you're going to need at least a 10V power supply to get the minimum required voltage. The INA106 and TL072 chips need a minimum of +/-5V so you can't use a single 9V battery and a voltage divider to do this. Setup 3: Use Muscle Sensor v3 schematicYou could also build your circuit using our Muscle Sensor v3 schematic. While it is still an older ...see more »Hi JI!This is a very old tutorial and our new sensors don't require the positive/negative power supply and can be powered directly from an Arduino. http://www.advancertechnologies.com/p/shop_3.htmlSetup 1: Voltage inverterThe INA106 and TL072 chips need a minimum of +/-5V so you should be fine using an inverter powered via an Arduino 5V supply.Setup 2: Voltage dividerIf you want to use the schematic/chips from this tutorial and a voltage divider, you're going to need at least a 10V power supply to get the minimum required voltage. The INA106 and TL072 chips need a minimum of +/-5V so you can't use a single 9V battery and a voltage divider to do this. Setup 3: Use Muscle Sensor v3 schematicYou could also build your circuit using our Muscle Sensor v3 schematic. While it is still an older design than the MyoWare, the minimum power supply is +/-3.5V so you would easily be able to make a +/-4.5V supply using a single 9V battery and a voltage divider.

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