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  • Wireless Electricity Transmission (Simple things required to be collected from scrap)

    By the way, has anybody tried shoving the Tx coil up against an AM radio and seeing what happens?

    I'll tell you what, that's got to be the most complicated way I've ever seen to say both need an electric and magnetic field! :O

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  • Wireless Electricity Transmission (Simple things required to be collected from scrap)

    Surely it made an ethereal parabola? :) Besides that you were quite unlucky to have no effect, because when I do experiments like that the outcome is usually a lot of flashing blue lights and it seems to attract police dogs.............:)

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  • Wireless Electricity Transmission (Simple things required to be collected from scrap)

    Be interesting to slap this on the oscilloscope and see what sort of waveform turns out. What do you think, sawtooth?

    With regards to power: there is a thing that works on a similar principle that they use in schools here, although I haven't seen the full circuit specs. It works by running an induction loop round a classroom which carries modulated audio from a microphone the teacher wears. The audio is then transmitted into wearable hearing aids for deaf children. I'm told (but haven't seen for myself) that it gobbles a lot of power in the transmitting stage. Nobody seems harmed by it, so I'm going to see if I can adapt Mr Singh's project to do the same albeit on a smaller scale. With regards to other comments on here, I'm a qualified electronic engineer (BTEC) but have never done any proper work with electro-magnetic loops like this so this is a good starting point for me and I suspect a lot of othe...see more »With regards to power: there is a thing that works on a similar principle that they use in schools here, although I haven't seen the full circuit specs. It works by running an induction loop round a classroom which carries modulated audio from a microphone the teacher wears. The audio is then transmitted into wearable hearing aids for deaf children. I'm told (but haven't seen for myself) that it gobbles a lot of power in the transmitting stage. Nobody seems harmed by it, so I'm going to see if I can adapt Mr Singh's project to do the same albeit on a smaller scale. With regards to other comments on here, I'm a qualified electronic engineer (BTEC) but have never done any proper work with electro-magnetic loops like this so this is a good starting point for me and I suspect a lot of other people and I thank Mr Singh for putting it on.

    No, it's a bit different. It's an induction coil, or pair thereof. For a crystal radio you'd need a capacitor and a germanium diode in there too.

    Yes, it's a kind of relaxation oscillator,but you still couldn't use it as a crystal radio though. The inductor's not variable, nor the capicitance, and you'd struggle to demodulate through a transistor and I'm not sure the impedance would be high enough to drive crystal headphones. In addition you'd need a long antenna and a ground wire.

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