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  • Kane Tsugi Joint  -  Three way pinned corner mitre

    Anywhere, really, in any frame construction, from tables and bed frames to the large-scale carpentry of temples and homes built or reconstructed using traditional methods and materials (and often traditional tools, although these days hand-held power tools are often used alongside hand tools in Japan).And on the contrary (referring to that implied view that such joints may possibly serve no practical purpose and someone may never have a use for that joint), one would have many practical uses for that and the many more complex and elaborate, but very stable and sturdy Japanese joints and joinery techniques in fact. Aesthetics and finely honed skills and expertise doesn't come at the expense of practicality and usefulness, but in fact it elevates it to a higher level, albeit at the cost o...see more »Anywhere, really, in any frame construction, from tables and bed frames to the large-scale carpentry of temples and homes built or reconstructed using traditional methods and materials (and often traditional tools, although these days hand-held power tools are often used alongside hand tools in Japan).And on the contrary (referring to that implied view that such joints may possibly serve no practical purpose and someone may never have a use for that joint), one would have many practical uses for that and the many more complex and elaborate, but very stable and sturdy Japanese joints and joinery techniques in fact. Aesthetics and finely honed skills and expertise doesn't come at the expense of practicality and usefulness, but in fact it elevates it to a higher level, albeit at the cost of years of study and practise.Most of the traditional Japanese joinery techniques and their catalogued joints have been invented and they evolved over hundreds of years for the traditional / historical building trade that had an interest in doing away with the need for inferior or hard-to-source metal fasteners in historical times, yet creating even stronger joints and frames and longer-lasting, stronger buildings (traditional wooden frame homes, teahouses, shrines, temples, etc.), even more resistant to everything from inclement weather, heavy rain, and wide swings of temperature from summer to winter, to the frequent tremors and earthquakes of Japan -- as well as a point of quiet pride and expertise and respect for everything from one's tools and the quality woods used, trees carefully selected to the end result, be it a temple or a simple shoji panel.As a result, some of the longest-lived wooden buildings and structures are found in Japan, unsurprisingly.And most traditional trades in Japan required many years of intensive learning and apprenticeship (7 years here, for instance, but the bare minimum used to be 5 years and up to 10 or more, with modern requirements of 3 years now considered acceptable, using some handheld power tools and more direct and efficient training methods compared to the traditional 'stealing' of your craft and knowledge from your master). Joinery / carpentry is no different in that regard.On a side note, in case someone wonders why the author of this 'Indestructable' uses softwood rather than hardwoods such as maple, the woods used generally in Japanese traditional carpentry involve mostly very straight- but close-grained softwoods, very tall and straight Japanese varieties of cypress, pine, cedar, and to some extent hardwoods such as cherry and Japanese elm, etc. Woods known in English under the names of Japanese red pine, Japanese red cypress, Japanese red cedar, zelkova, paulownia, etc. some of which grow up to a straight 50, 70 metres and more, or about 150 to 200 feet, to use rounded numbers.(As a side note to the side note above, an easy reference for the US reader -- and to help NASA with any future conversion difficulties :p-- one US yard is just short of an International Standards metre, and there are 3 feet to a yard, one foot is just shy of 30.5 centimetres, which is just shy of 1/3 of one metre or 33.333... cm, so you can rough-estimate metres dividing feet by 3 in your head, or for a closer estimate by 3.3, and vice versa, multiplying by 3 or 3.3 the metres in your head in order to get a quick measurement estimate in feet).

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