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  • Instructor477 commented on badarsworkshop's instructable Bench Power Supply23 days ago
    Bench Power Supply

    I was just scanningthis instructable to see if I might be interested. I get that youare focused primarily on the creation of the printed case, but Iwound up with a lot of questions about the electrical guts of theproject. The materials include "Power Supply Module 30V 5A","Power Supply 36V 1.4A 50W", and "Voltage Regulator"(the supplier's terms?). The instructions by contrast refer to "fanregulator", "power supply", and "power regulator"(your terms.) The correspondences between these two lists is notimmediately obvious.If I had to guess, Iwould pick "Power Supply 36V 1.4A 50W" (probably a fixedvoltage switching supply) as the principal DC source (the larger unitin the perforated metal case?). Then the "Powe...

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    I was just scanningthis instructable to see if I might be interested. I get that youare focused primarily on the creation of the printed case, but Iwound up with a lot of questions about the electrical guts of theproject. The materials include "Power Supply Module 30V 5A","Power Supply 36V 1.4A 50W", and "Voltage Regulator"(the supplier's terms?). The instructions by contrast refer to "fanregulator", "power supply", and "power regulator"(your terms.) The correspondences between these two lists is notimmediately obvious.If I had to guess, Iwould pick "Power Supply 36V 1.4A 50W" (probably a fixedvoltage switching supply) as the principal DC source (the larger unitin the perforated metal case?). Then the "Power Supply Module30V 5A" is probably an adjustable buck converter (the smallerbare module, being utilized here at a confusingly small fraction ofits rating) as the "fan regulator". The real sleeper thenwould be the "Voltage Regulator" (aka the powerregulator?), which appears to combine both the frontpanel/controller/user interface function with another adjustable buckconverter in one module. Did I get that right? I also didn't seewhere in the assembly instructions the "power regulator"gets installed in the case and how it is fastened.Would you consideradding more detailed (and consistent) descriptions of your electronicmodules and, if not a schematic per se, then perhaps a block diagraminstead for the benefit of future readers?

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  • How to Replace a Submersible Well Pump

    Dear Mr. JamesBurkeFan,I'm kind of old-school (just plain old, not to put too fine a point on it), and I'm not real comfortable seriously addressing or referring to persons by long, often bizarre user names, although that may be the etiquette here. Hence the "our author". BTW, I just had to make up a user name too in order to comment on yours, and maybe mine was misleading. I've never taught anything professionally, although I'm broadly knowledgeable in a number of fields and I've often been called on to be an explainer.I may have been a little condescending on the terminology issue (for which I apologize), but I'm kind of a stickler for words, and I did get thrown momentarily by you referring to the pipe as "water tubing." In my experience "tubing" almo...

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    Dear Mr. JamesBurkeFan,I'm kind of old-school (just plain old, not to put too fine a point on it), and I'm not real comfortable seriously addressing or referring to persons by long, often bizarre user names, although that may be the etiquette here. Hence the "our author". BTW, I just had to make up a user name too in order to comment on yours, and maybe mine was misleading. I've never taught anything professionally, although I'm broadly knowledgeable in a number of fields and I've often been called on to be an explainer.I may have been a little condescending on the terminology issue (for which I apologize), but I'm kind of a stickler for words, and I did get thrown momentarily by you referring to the pipe as "water tubing." In my experience "tubing" almost always refers to small stuff, usually copper or clear/white plastic, so I had to look again at the pictures to make sure I wasn't missing something.I do understand, whether you are a professional or not, that you were documenting a particular case that circumstances presented to you, and you clearly succeed in achieving that goal. As far as your "ible" is concerned the only thing I really had to add was the tip about using a 55 gal. drum as a kind of no-kink pulley/block for the poly pipe. I was inspired to throw in the additional related information after scanning the comments of others and seeing that there seems to be a need for more information about water wells in general. That's how I ran across yours; I did a general web search and it was one of the few things to turn up. As far as being forced to consult a professional (advice is one thing you may need, but when they tell you you can't...) because someone's setup is different from yours, I say, REALLY? That's not what maker/DIY culture is all about, is it? Isn't what we really need a wider variety of cases documented. I myself worked with a galvanized, screwed-together drop pipe many years ago. Of course there are cases where only a professional will do, but there are many others a homeowner can handle if he or she has the right information.As far as my own recent experience is concerned, I needed to replace the equipment at my well head after a fire (seal, pressure tank, pipes, and the electrical stuff; the pressure switch, pump starter/controller, the pumphouse breaker panel as well as splice the last few feet of the pump cable.) It's too late to take pictures of some of it since a sort of back-woods professional already opened it up and pointed out what needs to be done. I suppose I could do a brief instructable about that, but it's kind of an unusual, not very commonly-encountered situation. I suppose it might be of some value to others in that it would show a warm-climate well seal setup with the pipe coming right up and out as an alternative to a frost-resistant underground connection with a well cap on top. Maybe I'll do one when I do my solar conversion on the well.

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  • How to Replace a Submersible Well Pump

    p { margin-bottom: 0.1in; line-height: 120%; }This piece was veryinstructive as far as the particular situation it covered, but thequestions have gone beyond that, so let me add some additionalinformation from my own experience. Our author seems tobe trying to keep the terminology very generic, but by the time youhave to get into “pitless adapters”and “check valves”, youmight as well learn a little well-speak. The generic terms “watertube” and “tubing” translate to the specialist's term “pipe”;o). In a well what you have is called the “drop pipe”, and inthis instructable it happened to consist of flexible black “polypipe”. One tip that our author could have used is that if you laya 55 gal. barrel on ...

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    p { margin-bottom: 0.1in; line-height: 120%; }This piece was veryinstructive as far as the particular situation it covered, but thequestions have gone beyond that, so let me add some additionalinformation from my own experience. Our author seems tobe trying to keep the terminology very generic, but by the time youhave to get into “pitless adapters”and “check valves”, youmight as well learn a little well-speak. The generic terms “watertube” and “tubing” translate to the specialist's term “pipe”;o). In a well what you have is called the “drop pipe”, and inthis instructable it happened to consist of flexible black “polypipe”. One tip that our author could have used is that if you laya 55 gal. barrel on its side and pull your poly pipe over it at aright angle, the curved side will keep the pipe from kinking, and youmight be able to do without the extra hand for that stage.Some pumps hang frommultiple lengths of jointed (screwed-together) rigid pipe, such asgalvanized steel or threaded PVC. In those cases you need more toolsand equipment; a couple of pipe wrenches, something (a pipe vise?)to clamp onto the pipe and keep it from dropping back in, and somekind of support like a tripod or derrick to hold the currentlyexposed section of raised pipe up vertically until the next joint israised to the point where you can unscrew it. This is a morecomplicated pull than with flexible pipe, but it is still within thedo-able range for many motivated homeowners.In milder climates(West coast, the South) pitless adapters and underground connectionsare not needed. In these light- or no-frost areas the normalpractice is to use a “well seal” instead of a cap. This flat,round device has holes in it for the drop pipe and the wires to comeright out of the top of the casing, and the right angle in theexiting pipe is made with a simple elbow fitting where it exits theseal. The fitting that connects to the poly pipe (what he calls a“spur” and we call a “barb”) is matched by another one at thetop of the pipe, which would be coupled to a short pipe (“nipple”)going up through the well seal into the bottom of the elbow. All ofthis, including the pressure tank and pressure switch, is typicallylocated next to the well head in a small outbuilding, the pump house.Speaking aboutswitches, electrical issues weren't covered much in thisinstructable. I would recommend having a cutoff switch installednear the pressure switch to avoid the convenience-versus-risktradeoff as described. Also there is the matter of acontroller/starter box, which most pumps require. Our authordoesn't address this issue at all. New pumps often come packaged witha new contoller, so the electrical aspect of pump replacement reallyneeds to be addressed as well.

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