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  • IvliaB commented on lukeg22woo's instructable Design and Build a Tiny House2 weeks ago
    Design and Build a Tiny House

    Quite agree. As stated before I worked in insurance, albeit a few decades ago, and even then you could get insurance for a caravan (way before tiny homes per se) but it was best to get it through your local caravan club because they could get a good deal due to weight of numbers. But it was still only worth it if you used your caravan (as in travelled, stayed in, travelled back) at least once a month because of the cost. Like many others, we had a small caravan that my husband lived in mon-fri (he workedf 200 miles away from home, heck of a drive to do daily) but we did without the insurance, a small cheap caravan meant it wasn't worth the premiums. If you have expensive stuff inside though - electrical goods, solar panels, chargers, etc. - then it would definitely be worth it, especial...

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    Quite agree. As stated before I worked in insurance, albeit a few decades ago, and even then you could get insurance for a caravan (way before tiny homes per se) but it was best to get it through your local caravan club because they could get a good deal due to weight of numbers. But it was still only worth it if you used your caravan (as in travelled, stayed in, travelled back) at least once a month because of the cost. Like many others, we had a small caravan that my husband lived in mon-fri (he workedf 200 miles away from home, heck of a drive to do daily) but we did without the insurance, a small cheap caravan meant it wasn't worth the premiums. If you have expensive stuff inside though - electrical goods, solar panels, chargers, etc. - then it would definitely be worth it, especially today when if it's not bolted down they'll nick it (steal it) and sell it on. Simply, sit down and work out what you have in your tiny home, then search all the different insurance options - and don't discount belonging to a club of some sort if it gets better insurance for affordable premiums - and then look at the figures. If it's a steel/aluminium chassis and frame then if it burns you still have the basic frame, you can rebuild. If it's all wood and you have expensive items like cooking appliances, solar panels and add-ons, electrical appliances and anything else worth good money to replace, then I'd seriously consider insurance. Think of it as household insurance, you have house and contents, why should a tiny home be any different because what you lose in a big house house fire is just as precious as what you lose in a tiny house house fire.

    If it's warm or temperate all year try a bicycle powered washer (exercise plus quicker washing) and a line or rack outside for drying. There are also gas powered washer dryers available if you have lots of washing and really want to be off grid without driving into a laundromat each week

    Agree. If disabled like me there are tiny washer/spin dryers around - mainly from China - suitable for tiny homes/holiday homes/caravans/student flats which just wash and spin dry. You can add a simple line outside, or just buy a space saving clothes horse/dryer that can be put up and taken down, or put up inside if it does nothing but rain and you're running out of clothes. Plus, if you're really desperate there is almost certainly going to be a laundrette or something similar. We pack all out large items up every friday - work clothes (son-in-law in construction so they get really dirty), bedding, towels etc. and take them in to the local dry cleaner each week (she also has washers and dryers and a lot of customers) and pick them up the same evening. We have a small twin tub for undie...

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    Agree. If disabled like me there are tiny washer/spin dryers around - mainly from China - suitable for tiny homes/holiday homes/caravans/student flats which just wash and spin dry. You can add a simple line outside, or just buy a space saving clothes horse/dryer that can be put up and taken down, or put up inside if it does nothing but rain and you're running out of clothes. Plus, if you're really desperate there is almost certainly going to be a laundrette or something similar. We pack all out large items up every friday - work clothes (son-in-law in construction so they get really dirty), bedding, towels etc. and take them in to the local dry cleaner each week (she also has washers and dryers and a lot of customers) and pick them up the same evening. We have a small twin tub for undies and other small items plus a folding clothes rack we put outside (or inside in winter) to dry the clothes on. Also have hooks over the windows jutting out to hang hangers from (dresses etc.) for drying. Be inventive because this is an ages old problem, ask around on forums for ideas, I would suggest ask those in 'trailer parks' (is that the correct terminology) but in America everyone seems to have washer/dryers but there are many countries where, like us, people live in trailers (mobile homes here) and who don't have a washer dryer, or like us years ago who live in caravans during the week for work (you still have to wash things) where space is at a premium and a washer dryer won't fit.

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  • IvliaB commented on Carleyy's instructable Wall Mounted Sewing Station3 weeks ago
    Wall Mounted Sewing Station

    Make your pincushion then before sewing up the base insert a small magnet (from any good craft shop) and glue it to the fabric at the base, sew up and finish as normal. When you need to pull up pins just wave the base of the pin cushion over your work space and it will pick up all the pins then transfer to other side of cushion. Another way is the one used by my sewing mistress at secondary school, on a hook by the door she hung a simple horseshoe magnet and when we were finished our class before we left the room someone would take the magnet down and wave it over all the tables and the floor, voila, all pins suddenly accounted for. You could hang one on the end of the board or place it in a small bag as an alternative to the magnetic pin cushion. Either work just fine.

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  • IvliaB commented on lizzyastro's instructable Charm Pack Baby Quilt1 month ago
    Charm Pack Baby Quilt

    Nice design, and easily made. I have lots of bits of fabric left over from various projects (I make clothes) and this would be the perfect way to use them up. Cut into square or oblongs, depending on amounts available, and turn into a quilt. I have had a number of requests for them for the upcoming winter so think I will use this design. Many thanks as it looks fairly easy, though I will have to cut my own squares and stuff, can be done while watching a film so not a problem.

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  • IvliaB commented on Not_Tasha's instructable Easy Sewing Hacks1 month ago
    Easy Sewing Hacks

    Ironing wet fabric is great, but if you need to get creases out after you've started a project, or just need to press open seams etc., instead of wetting the fabric or having to fill the iron with water just grab a piece of left over fabric or a teatowel (my mums preferred method), run it under a tap/faucet and squeeze the excess water out then place over the item to be ironed. Hey presto, effect of steam ironing without the hassle, and you can leave it to one side and use it over and over as needed until finished, by which time you also have a dry tea towel again. Helps to protect delicate fabrics as well, plus I've never had to worry about the iron temperature being too high for the fabric I'm ironing, the tea towel acts as a protector in that regard as well. I still find it's better ...

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    Ironing wet fabric is great, but if you need to get creases out after you've started a project, or just need to press open seams etc., instead of wetting the fabric or having to fill the iron with water just grab a piece of left over fabric or a teatowel (my mums preferred method), run it under a tap/faucet and squeeze the excess water out then place over the item to be ironed. Hey presto, effect of steam ironing without the hassle, and you can leave it to one side and use it over and over as needed until finished, by which time you also have a dry tea towel again. Helps to protect delicate fabrics as well, plus I've never had to worry about the iron temperature being too high for the fabric I'm ironing, the tea towel acts as a protector in that regard as well. I still find it's better than a steam iron for many things, especially when applying iron-on interfacing or batting, either or both easily melt if the heat of the iron is too high even when set on steam.

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  • IvliaB commented on lukeg22woo's instructable Design and Build a Tiny House2 months ago
    Design and Build a Tiny House

    Even if you wash by hand I can't recommend highly enough that you get some sort of spin dryer. You can make a simple centrofuge yourself, think outsize salad spinner. But it will remove excess water which will make drying clothes so much quicker and easier, especially in winter. It will even make drying your towel and flannel after a shower quicker and easier, not to mention tea towels etc. You don't need electric (though it makes life easier and you can get great washer/spinner combinations designed for caravans) cause even a hand operated one (suitable geared obviously) makes life so much easier.

    This would probably depend where you live. In New Zealand for example you have to have your trailer every year just as you would a car, don't know what you call it in the US but it's MOT/NCT/warrent of fitness in UK/RoI/NZ. I believe the same might be needed in Europe, caravans certainly do so a trailer house probably would as well. Look in the Highway Code/Road Code booklet or on-line, that would tell you. What I do know is that if you're in an accident of any kind the insurance may not pay out if they deem the item being towed to be unsafe in any way, shape or form (and they can be nitpicking in this regard, used to work in insurance). I would recommend you check, ask, and check again. Also, do different states have different regulations, if so that could catch you out as well. Bette...

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    This would probably depend where you live. In New Zealand for example you have to have your trailer every year just as you would a car, don't know what you call it in the US but it's MOT/NCT/warrent of fitness in UK/RoI/NZ. I believe the same might be needed in Europe, caravans certainly do so a trailer house probably would as well. Look in the Highway Code/Road Code booklet or on-line, that would tell you. What I do know is that if you're in an accident of any kind the insurance may not pay out if they deem the item being towed to be unsafe in any way, shape or form (and they can be nitpicking in this regard, used to work in insurance). I would recommend you check, ask, and check again. Also, do different states have different regulations, if so that could catch you out as well. Better safe than sorry.

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  • IvliaB commented on jessyratfink's instructable homemade dry shampoo9 months ago
    homemade dry shampoo

    The vodka is added to ensure it won't go rancid. Can use plain alcohol, the stuff you buy to make your own liqueurs as well, unscented. If you like the scent use gin. The alcohol content is the important part if you want to make this to last. The more alcohol, within reason, the longer it will last.

    As an aside that is slightly unrelated. For those who have infestations of head lice - kids at school are main carriers - I have found that a mix of several different oils incl. Rosemary, Lavender, Thyme and Tea Tree mixed in with olive oil and applied - with a spray bottle - every couple of days gets rid of lice. Commercial products didn't work when local school had a bad outbreak so used this after asking an aromatherapist friend. Leaves hair greasy but just braided it, upside was no more headlice for the next 4 years til she left for secondary school. Was thinking I wish I'd known about the dry shampoo mixes back then, could have used it at night before brushing/combing next morning, adding more oils and rebraiding. Would have helped brush/comb out dead lice. Will be directing friend...

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    As an aside that is slightly unrelated. For those who have infestations of head lice - kids at school are main carriers - I have found that a mix of several different oils incl. Rosemary, Lavender, Thyme and Tea Tree mixed in with olive oil and applied - with a spray bottle - every couple of days gets rid of lice. Commercial products didn't work when local school had a bad outbreak so used this after asking an aromatherapist friend. Leaves hair greasy but just braided it, upside was no more headlice for the next 4 years til she left for secondary school. Was thinking I wish I'd known about the dry shampoo mixes back then, could have used it at night before brushing/combing next morning, adding more oils and rebraiding. Would have helped brush/comb out dead lice. Will be directing friends to this site for recipe to use for above purposes. Thanks, talc/baby powder just doesn't work the same when mixed with oils.

    Don't know if they are in the US but the british firm Boots Chemists sell own brand mineral face powder in round containers with a perforated inner lid and big brush. Can easily be reused when empty for other powders. Have several with remains of solid powder products that have broken in use like bronzer and stuff. Break it down and put in an old mineral container and label. Really useful. Other companies must make them as well.

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  • IvliaB commented on blkhawk's instructable House built with plastic and glass bottles1 year ago
    House built with plastic and glass bottles

    Except cement/concrete buildings built by the Romans over 2000 years ago are still standing, and in the case of one combined earthquake/flood the roman built concrete bridge was the ONLY building left standing. All the modern ones were ruins.

    Ask all your friends to save their empty plastic water and soda bottles. You'll be surprised how fast the pile grows and you're helping the recycling effort as well.

    See my comment above. Watch a series call Grand Designs available on YouTube and look for the episode that involves an entire house built from glass bottles and mud/concrete. The presenter is both an architect and an engineer and knows his stuff. If you are interested at all in this kind of building you need to watch this series, though as it's been on TV in the UK for 15 years you will have a number of episodes to sort through, but it's well worth it and very informative.

    Look on YouTube for a series called Grand Designs. In there you will f ind some houses built using bottles and another built using used car tires. They show you exactly how they are built and go from plot of ground to finished project being lived in. May answer some of your questions. Is certainly done in Europe as the above programme shows.

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  • IvliaB commented on GLOB_Youtube's instructable Cardboard Tube Bird Feeder 1 year ago
    Cardboard Tube Bird Feeder

    Sounds like a great idea but what to the birds cling on to while trying to feed. Plus, in my garden it would last about 2min before the food was gone and I had to replace it. A full plastic version of this with mixed seed on the inside gets emptied daily, and that only caters for a few varieties of birds. I won't mention all the others we feed.Yes, we live in the countryside but feeding the birds is great for the parents feeding chicks and for the chicks themselves when they first leave the nest. It also provides hours of entertainment for our house cat.

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