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  • Produce a Rich Rust Patina on Iron and Steel, Safely and Quickly, Using Common Household Chemicals

    Most beeswax has a higher ignition point (147F°). While some paraffin wax might burn at 157F° most of it is closer to 120F°. And you just never know unless you know the source of your wax and can email the manufacturer (it's wildly different between manufacturers). So you get a higher on average known ignition point for starters.Another thing is that paraffin has much lower friction surface due to it's additives. This means it tends to be slicker and so it doesn't bind as well or as closely, to as many surfaces. It also tends to be more crumbly or flakey then beeswax. Lastly you cannot know how all paraffin wax may react with an acid. There are so many additives from so many brands that this isn't something that you can really predict.The reasons we use mostly Paraffin wax t...see more »Most beeswax has a higher ignition point (147F°). While some paraffin wax might burn at 157F° most of it is closer to 120F°. And you just never know unless you know the source of your wax and can email the manufacturer (it's wildly different between manufacturers). So you get a higher on average known ignition point for starters.Another thing is that paraffin has much lower friction surface due to it's additives. This means it tends to be slicker and so it doesn't bind as well or as closely, to as many surfaces. It also tends to be more crumbly or flakey then beeswax. Lastly you cannot know how all paraffin wax may react with an acid. There are so many additives from so many brands that this isn't something that you can really predict.The reasons we use mostly Paraffin wax today is that it is relatively cheap and easy to make in large quantities (it's a petroleum by-product). we can dye it easier (bee's wax begins as a light amber color and can get darker from there so you can really only go darker then the base color). And because it is smokeless. This makes it nice for candles. But beeswax is still the choice of craftsman who have a use for wax.If your concerned about it melting under the heat generated by the metal reacting to the acid. You could invest the top layer of wax with a good amount of baking soda. This should raise it's ignition point and naturalize fumes that come in contact with it and most acid that touches it directly.

    Your welcome.

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  • Produce a Rich Rust Patina on Iron and Steel, Safely and Quickly, Using Common Household Chemicals

    No it won't. You melt the wax on. So the seal is very close. It conforms around the smallest changes in height. If it were Paraffin wax then yeah. But we're talking about bee's wax, it's a different beast. Just make sure what you re-expose for etching or aging is clean. even a thin film of left behind wax can prevent the acid from doing it's job.

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  • Produce a Rich Rust Patina on Iron and Steel, Safely and Quickly, Using Common Household Chemicals

    Bee's wax...Ever heard of a copper plate or steel plate engraving? What they would do is coat a plate of metal in bee's wax. Then they would scratch their design out and apply the acid. When it ate away enough of the metal they would neutralize the acid and peel the wax off. The acid would only eat what the wax was not covering. These finished plate where then patted with ink and hard pressed into paper. It was used to make impressed images like this (a copper plate engraving of people making copper plate engravings...engrave-ception): https://topicsofcapricorn.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/copperplate-press-21.jpg

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